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This item was found in Santa Fe NM in an old dried up ditch under a tree along with a rifle which I do not own anymore. Yes I found it about 14 years ago digging around as a kid. I do not know what type of wood it has or any helpful details. The only marking is really faded but appears to be two trees with a house in the background with hash marks covering the lower third. The barrel in my uneducated opinion appears to be that of around a 40 cal. I can't find this gun anywhere on the Internet nor can I match the markings. Any info helps thank you!
 

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The lock configuration and ramrod swivel bring to mind a Tower pistol, but I haven't a clue regarding the marking.
 

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Looks a bit like an old Belgian pistol I had years ago. Don't recognize the crest though. Appears to have been roughly cleaned at some time, you said it was buried? Even in a dry climate I would expect it to be in worse shape if it had been there long, Was it wrapped in anything when you found it?

Hopefully someone will recognize that crest and be able to narrow down what you have. Without that it's hard to say if it is an old original gun or an early reproduction without a hands on checkout. You might see if there are any gunshops in your area that deal in traditional muzzleloaders or antique guns as they might have someone who could look it over.
 

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Definately appears to be a reproduction, given the flat head screws, rough brass castings, and poor inletting. Probably from the 1960s. Possibly CVA. It doesn't appear to be a true copy of any particular gun from the past, but someone's interpretation of a 19th century military pistol.
 

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Looks to me like that pistol started off as one of the widely available 'kit guns' from the 70s. A lot of places sold them for about $75, and you built them like we did model airplanes as kids. The wood and metal was crudely shaped and the builder sanded, shaped and finished them to finish.

The wood is likely oak or another similar hardwood. Most of there were imported from Spain or Italy. The caliber is more than likely .44. Could be a lot of fun to put it back together and get it shooting again!
 

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The wood looks like pine to me. The crest appears to be two trees framing a casket with crossed cannons underneath.:eek::confused::rolleyes::confused: A closer look at the crest looks like a cabin in the distance behind the trees.
 

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Either a kit or a reproduction; little if any value. Be very careful if you intend to shoot it.
 

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the hammer, trigger, and gaurd definately look to be old cva but the rest havent a clue,, myself have never seen ramrod setup like you have,, lots of people in the '60s were takeing different manfactures parts and building their idea,, did several myself,,,,, appears to me what you may have ??
 

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the hammer, trigger, and gaurd definately look to be old cva but the rest havent a clue,, myself have never seen ramrod setup like you have,, lots of people in the '60s were takeing different manfactures parts and building their idea,, did several myself,,,,, appears to me what you may have ??
The ramrod setup was quite common on military muzzleloading pistols--kept you from dropping it while on horseback or at sea.
 

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A common response when it can't be ID is it's a kit gun, a tourist piece, etc. From one into old gun since the 1930s: -- it's a real military type pistol typical from the 1830/40s. It looks right other than the muzzle/ramrod treatment that may have had some 'creative' attention. I lean toward Northern Europe as its home, possibly a neo-military made in small numbers in military fashion for an estate, an expedition, shipping company, etc. It will take a lot of luck to ID it specifically. It's probably one of the great rarities of the gun world but supply being this one and demand being less, it won't have much value.
 

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A common response when it can't be ID is it's a kit gun, a tourist piece, etc. From one into old gun since the 1930s: -- it's a real military type pistol typical from the 1830/40s.
Not hardly, not with a full octagonal barrel. The hammer and lock escutcheons are off an Enfield rifled musket. The trigger guard is way to rough to have been an original and is a dead ringer for a CVA
 

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Not hardly, not with a full octagonal barrel. The hammer and lock escutcheons are off an Enfield rifled musket. The trigger guard is way to rough to have been an original and is a dead ringer for a CVA
Agreed--if not a kit gun, a rather poorly executed one-off that used a mixture of parts. The wood grain, rough brass trigger and trigger guard, poorly fitted tang, and overall proportions ALL speak to a gun made in the late 20th Century and not from the 1800s. You can also make out a mold seam in the ramrod tip...
 
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