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My buddy got this unknown to us rifle in a package deal with a nice K-98 Mauser. We know nothing about this rifle name, type, origin, ect. The only thing I can guess is it`s 6.5 mm. I would appreciate any info on it`s ID and history and links to find. DSC03649.JPG DSC03658.JPG DSC03662.JPG DSC03657.JPG
 

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Looks like a Carcano to me. I’ve never owned one but that my guess. Here’s a picture for comparison.

9273C423-2788-4714-800A-90D36DCDE880.jpeg
 

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It's a Model 1891 Carcano 6.5x52mm - the long rifle on which a series of short rifles and carbines was based.

Edit: Enter "A Quick and Dirty Guide: Carcano Rifle Models - Surplused" for an overview of the myriad variations on the basic 1891.
 

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I got a M38 carbine with the folding bayonet . The 6.5 is a nice soft shooting round . Hopefully it's got a good barrel on it . It takes a 6 round enbloc clip . After the last round is chambered the empty clip falls out the hole in bottom .
 

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What rifle from WW2 am I remembering the warning about the locking lug for the bolt breaking which allows the bolt to fly back in the shooter's face. Wasn't it the Italian Carcano?

I can't find anything on a Google search. Maybe it was just a rumor I heard many years ago.
 
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I remember in WW1 the Ross 1910 a straight pull if it was put back together wrong the lugs wouldn't lock up and it could fly back into a persons face . Forgotten Weapons did a video on it . I haven't heard about the Carcano doing that , not saying it couldn't .
 

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I remember in WW1 the Ross 1910 a straight pull if it was put back together wrong the lugs wouldn't lock up and it could fly back into a persons face . Forgotten Weapons did a video on it . I haven't heard about the Carcano doing that , not saying it couldn't .
The metallurgy that went into the Carcano design was quite sophisticated: one hardness for the bolt lockup area, another for the rest of the receiver. The rifling was gain twist, and the 6.5x52mm cartridge case actually had an internal "step" onto which the projectile was seated. Given a rifle in good condition and ammunition not produced under wartime conditions the Carcanos could hold their own in the accuracy department. While in Canada some years back I examined a competition variation of the '91 long rifle that had double-set triggers.
 

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If you decide to reload of course slug your bore but the Carcano 6.5 bullet usually takes .267 bullet by Hornady . They got 6.5 bullets out there but they are a little smaller and won't shoot good but Hornady makes a bullet specially for the Carcano at .267 thats a soft point . I bought several boxes to reload with few years back but can't remember were got the thru , Midway USA maybe . I am down to my last box so I need to start looking for some myself . When Carcanos started coming into the US in the surplus market they got a rep for poor shooting because the wrong diameter bullet was being used to reload with .
 

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No more powerful than this round is, you MAY find it more shootable with heavier cast projectiles. When obtainable, I'm betting the .267" SPs from Hornady projectiles are more expensive than the .264" analogs. Cast projectiles, in .267" diameter, with gas-checks, are likely made by someone, for less money per projectile. Just a thought.
 

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After buying my bullets before I actually started thinking about casting my own later . I cast for my black powder ammo but never have for my smokeless loads . I mostly use pure lead when casting would need to do some research on casting for higher pressure bullets . I need to track down some lead period getting low .
 
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