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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a USPSA match this weekend and when I arrived at the range, I met a new shooter who was there for his first match. When it was his turn to shoot the first stage and was told to "load and make ready", he had his finger on the trigger when he attempted to reholster a hot weapon. He hit the side of his holster with his finger causing it to fire the gun. The bullet entered his right thigh and ended up in his calf chipping both lower leg bones. So far, he has had 1 surgery and is scheduled to have another this week to remove the bullet.

I post this as a reminder that things happen and once a bullet is fired, it cannot be unfired. With all the handling of guns that we do, we get complacent and that leaves room for error.

Please, take a moment, slow down and remember your gun safety rules. We cannot be too cautious when it comes to handling, cleaning or firing a gun. It only takes a momentary lapse of attention for something very bad to happen that will haunt you for the rest of your life.
 

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SeeMore - your post brought to mind an advertisement I saw last night about some new show coming out on TV. Something about female LEOs in California. Anyway, the actress portraying a Cop was holding a semi auto pistol 'At The Ready' (with her finger INSIDE of the trigger guard). An accidental discharge waiting to happen.

Another actress had about the same pose - but she had her finger pointing up over the slide. Maybe not an 'accidental discharge' scenario - but I was wondering how long it would take her to find the trigger guard if she had to shoot quickly...

Maybe Hollywierd should consult someone with Police or Firearms training to coach the actors about how to actually handle a firearm? I know the idea is to portray the person in the scene as tough or Bad A.. (like a Gangsta holding a pistol sideways). They just don't realize how much of a novice they really look like.
 

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Actually, a really sharp alert range officer might have caught that before he holstered but I realize how quickly some reholster and that most probably wouldn't.

Now that I am much older and don't compete or hit the range as much as I used to, when I decided to apply for my concealed carry I made the decision to go with dao so as to avoid light triggers. Obviously training and paying attention is critical with guns and with most things in life.
 

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when I decided to apply for my concealed carry I made the decision to go with dao so as to avoid light triggers. Obviously training and paying attention is critical with guns and with most things in life.
Well, with a light trigger SA gun this would not have happened, the safety would have been engaged.
I feel much more comfortable holstering my 1911 with a 1.5lbs trigger than I feel holstering a Glock.

Lot of examples of people holstering their weapon in too much of a hurry and getting something stuck in the trigger guard whilst holstering and shooting themselves. Don't holster in a hurry and pay attention.
 

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another advantage of carrying a DA Revolver?
 

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Just out of curiosity, do we know the make/model of the pistol involved in the ND? Would it, perhaps, be a Glock or a similar striker-fired item? Just wondering.
 

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This ad happened on a range. When you add tunnel vision, incredible tension, a struggle and maybe fear into the equation, you can fumble the most simple things, you can forget safeties, a hammer can slip when lowering it on say a sa revolver. A twitch can fire some light triggers and fingers will probably be inside of trigger guards. That's the main reason I chose dao autos and revolvers to carry. Practice and training are critical yes, I just want that extra little margin of safety. My old Colt Series 70s trigger is about 2.5 or so and 4 with another spring but it's been many years since I competed with it; decades. I considered it and even bought one of those holsters with the finger release. At 73 do I really think in a crisis I will remember to hit the holster release and then the safety? Maybe; thirty years ago it would be probably or sure. I returned the holster and only carry the govt model which Heinie worked on when I get all nostalgic and it makes me feel good.
Usually it sits on the nightstand and now my 100 pound daughter likes to shoot it more than I do.
 

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I promise he won't do it again , a lesson learned . Sure he is beating himself up for quite awhile . For us all it just takes a moment of head up butt for something bad to happen . Never say never happen to me .My wife hates it when we watch a movie and I point that stuff out . I really smerk when the use guns from wrong time in history .
 

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Actually, a really sharp alert range officer might have caught that before he holstered but I realize how quickly some reholster and that most probably wouldn't.

Now that I am much older and don't compete or hit the range as much as I used to, when I decided to apply for my concealed carry I made the decision to go with dao so as to avoid light triggers. Obviously training and paying attention is critical with guns and with most things in life.
I have a Glock 40 in 10mm and I got a Kenai Chest Holster for woods carry. I have decided to carry my SP101 on my right hip as the primary gun in the woods and my Glock as secondary BUG if more than 5 shots are needed for a situation, God forbid.

My Glock has a 4 lb trigger pull and I don't feel comfortable with the chest cross carry pointing right at my arm at times to have it locked and loaded during a holster pull. If I need more than 5 shots, a simple slide back and release is much quicker than revolver reload, at least for me.

My EDC is a Sig Sauer P27 in 45 cal with a de-cocker. I have a 10 lb trigger draw for the first shot, 4 lb for follow up shots. My Ruger SP101 is DAO as well. With kids in the house, I feel more comfortable with the stronger trigger pulls and for holstering and unholstering.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just out of curiosity, do we know the make/model of the pistol involved in the ND? Would it, perhaps, be a Glock or a similar striker-fired item? Just wondering.
CZ TSO sao 1.5# trigger

I talked with his RO and he was trying to stop him because he didn't engage the safety after making the gun hot but he couldn't stop him before the nd.

So no, can't blame a striker fire this time.
 

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CZ TSO sao 1.5# trigger
:yikes:

That could be a ND just breathing on the thing!

The trigger on my 1911 is around 4.5 to 5 lbs. To me, that is plenty light enough for USPSA. A 1.5 lb trigger seems more for speed shooting from a stationary position rather than running a USPSA course.

Then again, my CCW instructor had a customized competition gun with a 0.5 lb trigger. You could blink and the gun would go off from the breeze your eyelashes made. He could empty a magazine in just a hair over a second with that gun.
 

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:yikes:

That could be a ND just breathing on the thing!

The trigger on my 1911 is around 4.5 to 5 lbs. To me, that is plenty light enough for USPSA. A 1.5 lb trigger seems more for speed shooting from a stationary position rather than running a USPSA course.

Then again, my CCW instructor had a customized competition gun with a 0.5 lb trigger. You could blink and the gun would go off from the breeze your eyelashes made. He could empty a magazine in just a hair over a second with that gun.
Now that is scary.
 
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