New England Firearms

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by Virgil S, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    . . . even with a $250 scope on top of it!!
     
  2. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    DC and moody make a valid point. If I remember right, I have just over $500 in all four of mine; $550 if you add the 10 gauge shotgun with two choke tubes. During my highly sophisticated search :D(looked at several sites), didn't see many marked sold or with bids on them.
    Collectable or particularly valuable? Nope. Good value for the money? I think so.
    Edit: Gotta run. Coffee's ready.
     
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  3. shootbrownelk

    shootbrownelk Well-Known Member

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    Please, don't give High Point a reason to change their name.
     
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  4. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    LOL!
    I didn't think about that, but...yeah! :rotfl:
     
  5. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    Seriously (but only for a moment), I think the days of anyone making mint off of a break action single has passed.
    I remember there was a short time, maybe 10-12 years ago, when some very nice Winchester Model 37's were going for like $400-$500, but these were absolutely sano pigtailed red letter guns....just the proper amount of patina, lightly used, still had all the paint in the letters. A perfect example, in other words.
    I think the only guys who're gonna make any money selling a break action single these days, probably bought all their guns 30 years ago, got them in trade (like I did :thumbsup: ), or inherited them (which I might, as well :D )....otherwise, the only reason I can see for buying one is to use it...and they are as fine a shooter as any other gun.
    ...that being said, I would like to see someone produce a nice high end single, that isn't a competition gun, with all the classic American ear marks.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
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  6. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Do you mean any single shot or just a break action, and how would you define classic American ear marks? My definition for a break action rifle would be one with nice walnut, an exposed hammer and a top lever release. Do you have an opinion on the Henry single shots? I've only seen pictures and read reviews, but it looks like they might fill the bill. Not looking to start an argument, just interested in your opinion. BTW, isn't that an H&R receiver in your avatar?
     
  7. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    I thought those guys made motorcycles.:rolleyes:
     
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  8. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    OK MISTER, THAT'S IT! YOU'VE PUSHED ME FAR ENOUGH!!!.....kidding ;)

    To answer your question, I think you listed some key points with your descriptives....and yes, a break action gun.
    I was thinking along the lines of a shotgun more than a rifle, as there's more "history" with that type...I mean, what did they used to say about the Winchester Model 37? "The Gun that taught America to shoot."
    There was time when one (regardless of make) could probably be found in most households.
    On top of the styling points you mentioned, I think a case hardened receiver would be a "must".
    The hammer I would like to see would be a bit rounded, both fore and aft and across the spur.
    Look at an older gun and you'll see the hammer spur is almost made like a boat....no straight lines. If you look at a modern hammer spur, its very obvious the thing was machined. All squared off with the checkering that creates a pad made of little spikes. With the older guns, the hammers were more rounded and the checkering lines on the spur were more spaced out, creating a hammer one could still grip, but didn't neccessarily dig into one's thumb.
    The shape of the receiver would also be something to be addressed. I prefer something more along the lines of an Iver Johnson or Harrington & Richardson, as opposed to the more Euro sleek look of guns like the Hatfield or the Yldiz (not that there's anything wrong with either of those guns).
    Lastly, when I state "high end shotgun", I'm referring to something like these guns....https://connecticutshotgun.co/
    ...so yeah, not exactly your local hardware store special. :D
    As for my avatar, yes, that's a 28 gauge NEF Pardner posed with a couple of quail, some shells and a glove, all laid on the grass.
    I found it on the net and copped it, thinking it might come in handy...and it did. =)

    NEF_Pardner_28Gauge_01.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020
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  9. Virgil S

    Virgil S Member

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    Thanks guys for all the replies. Some good info. I also messaged someone at another website and he said (I didnt know if I should credit him or not)
    he thought the shotgun was from their NWTF Edition Turkey Guns - They only made 2 models and the other was an adult 12 ga full choke 24" barrel. Also, the 270 rifle was part of their WTU (Whitetails Unlimited) Series and he thought that it was definitely a limited edition for some anniversary.
    Again thanks to all.
     
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  10. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    If they just didn't look so all fired cheap!! They CAN be made to look.....at least not so clumsy and not be much more expensive, if any. Spend enough money in their manufacture and they can be made elegant but, that defeats their purpose. Henry is getting closer but they aren't there yet. It's obvious they're good shooters and I agree they're pretty good value for the money and for someone who just wants a single shot....rifle or shotgun....without spending much money. But still, I saw one described as "excellent wood to metal fit and finish". What? Seriously? Apparently we have vastly differing opinions on "fit and finish".

    Oh, this American learned to shoot with a J.C. Higgins, single shot, bolt action 22.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
  11. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    I can see your point, Sharps.
    I think it goes back to what the manufacturer is looking to accomplish with their product(s).
    Their Charter, if you will.
    If you want to produce something, "competent", that a kid could buy with his paper route money, then that's what you're going to make.
    On the other hand, if you want to produce a finely crafted arm, that is both a joy to shoot and behold, with attention to detail that would garner it more a work of art, than just "a gun", then that's what you're going to produce.
    ...and so, the definition of terms like "fit and finish" are held within the parameters of those realms.
    Its not so much interpretation between individuals, but rather, the degree of manufacturing involved to create pieces in those realms.
    Action type shouldn't matter, and yet, all the "finest arms" tend to be SxS's and O/U's.
    ...maybe that's your challenge...take a bolt action single, which is probably seen by most as the "lowliest" of all shotgun types and make it into a $50K firearm.