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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.

I am trying to make up a load for my 9mm guns.

I am going to buy a chronograph but, I don't know what fps to shoot for.
How does a guy figure the fps for a certain caliber?

Also, what would be a good and inexpensive chronograph ?

Thank you,
Dale
 

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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.

I am trying to make up a load for my 9mm guns.

I am going to buy a chronograph but, I don't know what fps to shoot for.
How does a guy figure the fps for a certain caliber?

Also, what would be a good and inexpensive chronograph ?

Thank you,
Dale
I've been using a CED Millenium Chronograph I Got from Dillion Precision over 25 years ago. They're going for $200 bucks and it'll give you more info than you can ever use. Very accurate and it's never given me a single problem.

As for the "fps", I'd just use the velocities given in your manual and see which loads give the best performance.
My favorite load in both my Taurus PT99 and SA XDM Elite is: 5.5gr. CFE Pistol behind 115 gr. Hdy. HAP...
 

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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.

I am trying to make up a load for my 9mm guns.

I am going to buy a chronograph but, I don't know what fps to shoot for.
How does a guy figure the fps for a certain caliber?

Also, what would be a good and inexpensive chronograph ?

Thank you,
Dale
I bought Caldwell's Premium Kit. It, as is, will not work indoors due to florescent lights, but I believe their G2 does, don't quote me. If I wanted to throw the money and time at it I could make mine work indoors by adding LEDs and a tent somehow. It's kind of addicting, all I want to do now is "chrono" my loads. I hope I grow out of it and get back to just good old shootin' fun!
 

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If they are those argintina sp primers they are about the same a SR or SPM. I use them in everything 38, 9, 357, 45acp, and also in 223.

Through my testing they fall between Fed SR and CCI SR. SD wise they are about as good as CCI and better than Federal. 9mm and 38 requires about a 0.5 grains less powder just like most SRP do in small cases with fast powder.
 

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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.

I am trying to make up a load for my 9mm guns.

I am going to buy a chronograph but, I don't know what fps to shoot for.
How does a guy figure the fps for a certain caliber?

Also, what would be a good and inexpensive chronograph ?

Thank you,
Dale
I've had to switch over to SPM primers because regular SP primers have not been available to me for a very long time. If you don't have a chronograph just start on the light side of your charges and work up a load that performs well in your pistol(s). That's what I did when using SPM primers in 9X18, 9mm, .38 Specials and .45ACP. I also had the extra step in working with a new-to-me powder (700X) because some bone head decided not to produce my beloved Unique...grrrr
 

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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.
I wonder how you came to that conclusion, especially since you do not have a chrono.

If you already have good load just keep it and change the primer. A primer is a primer is a primer, SP,SR, SPM it's all a wash, within a few FPS.
I would not even think about it unless I was on the bleeding edge of max pressure.
 

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I have some off brand primers that should be standard small pistol primers.
However they seem to be a little hotter than spp.

I am trying to make up a load for my 9mm guns.

I am going to buy a chronograph but, I don't know what fps to shoot for.
How does a guy figure the fps for a certain caliber?

Also, what would be a good and inexpensive chronograph ?

Thank you,
Dale
Hi Dale,

FPS - Your loading data will give you the fps for a particular load but you must equate the barrel length your using to the one listed. You still need to watch for pressure signs even if you use a chrono. Usually add or subtact 25fps per inch of barrel difference (or about 1fps per millimeter). Also, revolvers can very more because of the differences in air gap between cyl and barrel and the throat size if it too big.

CRONO - About any of the 100$+/- cronos work okay or at least until you shoot it by accident - ha ha ha. The ones that have a threaded hole for a camera tripod are easier to setup. Just go to an online store and pick the one that has the features you like. Some have wires and you can run it from the bench. Some let you shoot multible stings and look later but you have to press a button on the screen to change the string. The kind with wires are a little handier if you are at a range cause you dont have to leave the bench to see or operate it but managing the wires at setup and teardown is a little more troublesome.
 

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It’s more about a safe chamber pressure than a muzzle velocity which will vary according to the particular barrels length, bore size (land-grove diameters), rifling rate of twist, chamber size, and how much of the cartridge case head is or is not supported.

If the cartridge cases are from one lot/batch, the best method is to measure the cartridge case expansion just forward of the extraction groove where the web is located as it’s the thickest portion of brass. The web should not expand more than .0001”-.0002”. This expansion can be measured with a .0000”-1.0000” micrometer standard type if used carfully. I use a blade type micrometer left over from my days as a machinist which is more precise in that measures a smaller area. Dial or digital calipers will not have a precise enough resolution.

One variable to measuring cartridge case web expansion is the particular brand of cartridge brass alloy used by whoever manufacture, which some brand’s of brass alloy may differ in its hardness. This brass hardness can even change from the same manufacture from one lot/batch too the next. If the cartridge cases have been once fired this measurement is still viable. The only caveat is if the cartridge cases are mixed brands as cartridge brass hardness will definitely be different amongst the various brands.
 

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The OLD "rule of thumb" with 9x19mm was 115 gr. @ 1250 f/s, 125 gr. @ 1150 f/s, or (more recently) 147 gr. @ 950 f/s. These are "optimal" velocities, and all is not lost if your reloads give lower ones. Concentrate on getting within 100 f/s of these "goals", and pay closer attention to how the load groups and functions.
If you are shooting from a suppressed weapon, the 147 gr. slugs are your best bet, as the lighter ones will produce a supersonic "crack" or perform poorly at lower velocities. A 147 gr. bullet at 950 f/s is a fairly impressive performer on thin-skinned predators, whether four-legged or two-legged.
If you develop a reload that develops, say, 893 f/s, but shoots one-hole groups at 25 yards and functions flawlessly, I would NOT go chasing the other 57 f/s.
 
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