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I need to get new shoes for my Trailblazer before the snow flies. What I have are cracking and getting close to the wear indicators, plus I expect it to get ugly this winter. For some reason the Hankook Dynapro AT2 keeps looking good to me. I had the previous version on our 99 Tahoe and that performed very well in the snow, plus they rode decent with a slight road noise.

What is on there now is Uniroyal Cross Country Touring. They ride very good and silent. I'd get a new set of those but the tread is more fitting to an SUV that stays on pavement and doesn't see more than 2" of snow.

The Uniroyals are 107T rated while the Hankook are 111T. That will stiffen up the ride just a bit. Too bad there is no 107's with snow grabbing tread pattern in my price range.

Keep in mind my deer hunting travels take me far off road and into some nasty places with drifted snow and or tall grass.

245/65-17
 

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I'm kind of surprised you don't have an extra set of wheels with REAL snow tires for winter use. My wife drove a 50 mile rural US Mail route (our car, a Subaru) every day and I would never have dreamt of sending her out with anything less than a severe weather rated tire. When the weather started to get cold I would jack it up and put the mounted snows on. She usually got 3 seasons before I would replace. I could usually sell the take-offs as they were still pretty good (for some people) but not good enough to be driving a rural route with lots of back roads IMO. In 30 yrs. of service there was only one day she did not complete the route because of the weather.
 

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Ya... I had to buy new tires for the jeep just so I could come visit you, cost me a lot of money :mad: then it was only for a few hours that we actually got to hang :( Moms potato salad made up for part of the pain :love: and Father in-law's 30-30 paid for the other part:thumbsup:
I don't need to buy snow tires this year:bounce:
 

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I'm running BF Goodrich All Terrain A/T tires at the moment, and I wouldn't hesitate to take on a snowy road. Of course, I'm the only one in Bullhead City that owns tire chains and knows how to use them.

Back in Crestline, PRC, most people kept two sets of tires - one studded for winter, the other set normal. Studded tires aren't legal there, but the cops just look the other way for locals.
 

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GUNZILLA
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I run the same tires as rawright54. Granted I don't have the snow issue here in Texas you guys have but they keep me from getting stuck in sand and work great off road in some of the back country in West Texas where I need to use 4 wheel drive because of the steep angles and loose shale, when hunting by Big Bend.
 

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I need to get new shoes for my Trailblazer before the snow flies. What I have are cracking and getting close to the wear indicators, plus I expect it to get ugly this winter. For some reason the Hankook Dynapro AT2 keeps looking good to me. I had the previous version on our 99 Tahoe and that performed very well in the snow, plus they rode decent with a slight road noise.

What is on there now is Uniroyal Cross Country Touring. They ride very good and silent. I'd get a new set of those but the tread is more fitting to an SUV that stays on pavement and doesn't see more than 2" of snow.

The Uniroyals are 107T rated while the Hankook are 111T. That will stiffen up the ride just a bit. Too bad there is no 107's with snow grabbing tread pattern in my price range.

Keep in mind my deer hunting travels take me far off road and into some nasty places with drifted snow and or tall grass.

245/65-17
Comb the junkyards for Hummer H-3 suspension stuff. Then Jack it up a couple more inches and put some big mudgrabber tires on it.
 

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Winter tires? What's that?

I've literally never seen more than a dusting of snow. I sometimes wonder how you guys do it. :eek:
I wondered the same. No snow here, just Winter mud.
 

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I have a similar problem with tires on my 94 Dodge 2500. It had brand new 18" Cooper's on it when it went to the first repair shop. Somehow the tires went flat and sat that way on the rims for a year and a half. Needless to say, they're ruined.
Looking for a mud/snow tire that doesn't cause a huge amount of road noise. Don't mind some but would like to be able to hear the radio w/o turning it all the way up. Figure it will be at least $1000 to replace all four.
 

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Garandaholic
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Comb the junkyards for Hummer H-3 suspension stuff. Then Jack it up a couple more inches and put some big mudgrabber tires on it.
He's interested in snow traction.
Dedicated mud tires provide about the worst snow traction possible.

If you can still find some, Michelin ATX2.
 

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I have a similar problem with tires on my 94 Dodge 2500. It had brand new 18" Cooper's on it when it went to the first repair shop. Somehow the tires went flat and sat that way on the rims for a year and a half. Needless to say, they're ruined.
Looking for a mud/snow tire that doesn't cause a huge amount of road noise. Don't mind some but would like to be able to hear the radio w/o turning it all the way up. Figure it will be at least $1000 to replace all four.
I like the Coopers, I have them on my Tundra and the wife's CRV. No problems ever, and they wear well. If I was flush with cash I'd probably try Michelins. I buy my tires from Discount Tires Direct, best prices around and free shipping.
 

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My cars all get Michelins. They seem to last 75,000 miles for me. If I had an older car that I was only going to keep for a year or two I would look for something cheaper.

Don't make the mistake of getting mudders or some radical off-road tire. It will ruin the ride. My son did it on his jeep. I did it on an old explorer I had years back. If you take a longer trip you will regret it.
 

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The worst part is when the power company is in route to restore your power and their tires weren't up to the task :eek:

View attachment 234262
While his tires may not have been up to the task, in many cases the drivers are not as well. Once while stopped at a Shoney's for breakfast in North Carolina we had a window seat. It had just snowed 2"-3" of slushy wet snow. It was like watching the Ice Capades, cars sliding sideways, backwards, every which way. The speed limit was 30 MPH...
 

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He's interested in snow traction.
Dedicated mud tires provide about the worst snow traction possible.

If you can still find some, Michelin ATX2.
Right, and if you're serious about winter driving, have a dedicated set of Nokia's, or Bridgestone Blizzard.
 
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