New to Black Powder

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by starman4, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. starman4

    starman4 New Member

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    Hi
    I’m new here. I’ve just discovered your forum. I have been shooting most of my life. Most of my shooting experience has been with SKS rifles, M1A rifles (M14 and M16 when I was in the Army), and even a Saiga 12. I have always thought I would enjoy black powder but I just never got into it. I just read an article in the American Rifleman, May 2009 issue, about Riflemen during the Revolutionary War and have decided it’s time to try black powder. I am particular interested in the flint lock Kentucky type of long rifle. Where should I start? Where can I purchase such a rifle and what should I expect to pay? What equipment will I need? Any suggestions on good books on the subject. Any help will be appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jjmitchell60

    jjmitchell60 Active Member

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    Raised in Buzzard Roost near Frog Town in hillls o
    Flint lock black powder guns like the Ky/Pa long rifle that was used SOME (mainly muskets were used in major battles as in Europe) are pricey to say the least. I have 3 45 caliber handmade reproduction nlong rifles that the cheapest one of them will sell well in excess of $1500 to $2000. Now with that said there are cheaper options as to flinters that I will get to in a minute BUT first I might suggest that you find a friend or some one at the range who has a percussion BP rifle (preferably traditional side lock) for you to try. The reason I say try one first is when it comes to traditional muzzle loader shooting, 99% of the people either love it or hate it. Rarely is there an in between shooter. So if you decide you like them, here are 3 links that bwill get you started and they do offer some cheaper re-productions (factory made):
    http://www.dixiegunworks.com
    http://www.trackofthewolf.com
    http://www.logcabinshop.com
    I advise buying a book on traditional muzzle loading if you decide it is something you like because to tell you all the details and what you will need would take pages of replies. The cheaper guns are the Traditions Pa long rifle, Dixie Gun Works brand or reproduction pa/Ky rifles, and Pedersoli line of reproductions. You will also need to find a source of traditional BP in your area (you can order from some distributors in 25 lb lots but shipping is high) because I have not found a BP substitute yet that will flash in the pan on flinters. That brings out another thing on traditional flint lock guns, the flash of the priming pan makes many flinch thuse we comonly refer to flint locks as "flinch locks". That is anotehr thing you should try before buying a flinter.

    I am not trying to talk anyone out of traditional flint lock shooting but one should know what they are getting into and many just do not like yet they do not find that out till AFTER they have spent a lot of money on a gun and all the items needed to shoot it. A traditions flinter will run around $500 new and then count on a good $200 to $500 in items needed to shoot it. IF handy with your hands, you can make a lot of the things you need your self.

    Hope this helps.
     

  3. starman4

    starman4 New Member

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    Thanks for your reply. I’ve had the opportunity to fire a percussion muzzle loader on several occasions, but never a flintlock. Unfortunately, I have not seen any black powder rifles at my range for several years. I grew up close to Williamsburg, VA and have always been intrigued by flintlocks. I think I would really like a flintlock, but I certainly appreciate your comments. I have checked out the sites you suggested and seen what they have for sale. I especially liked what I saw on Track of the Wolf. I am not sure if I have the ability to build a rifle from a kit and have it look like anything I would be proud to take to the range. As you suggested, I am going to look for a good book and go from there.
     
  4. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Welcome to the art of "shootin' dirty," starman.

    If you have fired AND cleaned black powder guns before and are still interested, then go for it. You don't have your state listed, so I can't tell you about the availability of black powder in your area. Some areas just don't have it. I have to go to a neighboring state to get it.

    It is a great lot of fun, and a bit fussy-fussy. That is why some people like it and others turn their backs.

    Take a closer look at the kits. Most of the work is in assembly. Finishing the stock is the job that requires the most care. If you brown your metal pieces, rather than blue them, you can do that in the shop with good results. The kits are primarly putting part A on Part B at the right place and, once in awhile, you might have to shave a sliver of wood off or stone a burr off of a small piece of metal. Remember to measure twice, cut once when doing cabinetry. In fitting gun parts it is cut twice. Cut and try. Doesn't fit, cut a little less and try. And so on. I'd much rather file once, sand once and emery cloth once to get a fit, than to grind and order a replacement.

    Pops
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2009
  5. starman4

    starman4 New Member

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    Hi Pops and thanks for your reply. I live in Eastern North Carolina. Your description of a kit makes it sounds fairly easy. I just may give one a try.
     
  6. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    I have built a couple and I am, by no means, a cabinet maker. I have done the final assemply of a couple of C&B pistols for friends, preping them for commercial bluing. I find it fun and relaxing, albeit, fussy, fussy. :D

    Pops
     
  7. questor

    questor Member

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    Last edited: May 1, 2009
  8. OLD NAVY

    OLD NAVY New Member

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    Hi,check this link.It is the best place for information on the web.They only let you talk about the old flintlock and percussion.weapons.They dont talk about the new inline rifles.I learned everything I know about black powder from them.So have at it.Old Navy http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fusionbb/fusionbb.php
     
  9. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    Nice article in the May American Rifleman on the House brothers and their Kentucky Rifles.
     
  10. starman4

    starman4 New Member

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    Dakota Red

    It was the article you mentioned that prompted me to try a flintlock Kentucky rifle.

    Some of you who have replied to this thread have suggested a kit. For a Kentucky rifle, which kits would you recommend?
     
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