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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a lee 50th anniversaty reloader, what dies do I need ,to get and what all I need to get to make the 7mm 08 ,7mm mag ,pt1911 remigition 45, 300 wetherby vanguard. I know power primer,but I don't want to buy two of the same die set ,
 

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You might want to buy a manual or two to start with and then read them.

For 7mm.08, you need 7mm.08 dies.
For 7mm Magnum, you need 7mm Magnum dies.
For .45 ACP, you need .45 ACP dies.
I guess you mean .300 Weatherby Magnum and if so, you need 300 Weatherby magnum dies.

Good luck with your endeavor!
 

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One each set for calibers mentioned. As you are new to reloading , do not get offended by my next comment. If you have to ask the question than you have not done enough reading. Mind you we prefer that you ask but before you start reloading you need to purchase several manuals for reloading. A good book to start is the ABC's of Reloading, and than you buy others.
 

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Every die set I have seen is marked with the cartridge it will reload. You may need to buy a factory crimp die for bottlenecked cases if the set does not have one in it. A typical set will be 3 or 4 dies, depending on what they are for and will include a deprime/resize die, a case mouth die, and a bullet seating die. Sometimes the set will have a crimp die. Not always.

I agree that reading manuals is the first step. I also recommend the Modern Reloading manual by Lee.
 

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I brought a novice to my house this afternoon, he wants to know how to re-load, so I let him load 100 sp .45 acp's with 230 gn LRN...Made him look up the recipe first, took him some time to get familiar with the pubs, but he found the right place, determined that we were safe with the powder selected, and then he chambered 100 spm primers for my Dillon..figure with spp would be fine to use the spm's...He's tired, but we 'got 'er done, and he's now anxious to acquire his own setup...He also has one of my manuals for homework...(and now he knows how to field strip his Glock, I showed him, but it was my first time to even hold a Glock)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That part I know I need the dies ,like I said I'm new
But I don't know the names of them like the one that pushes the bullet,to the shell,the one that I guess cuts the top of the shell and squeezes it smaller ,and the one that holds it in place ,is there a complet set that does all that?
 

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That part I know I need the dies ,like I said I'm new
But I don't know the names of them like the one that pushes the bullet,to the shell,the one that I guess cuts the top of the shell and squeezes it smaller ,and the one that holds it in place ,is there a complet set that does all that?

Bullet seat? That's #3, first would be re-size, deprime. That's the first die, then #2 would be flare mouth and deliver powder, next you would seat the bullet in the seating die, and finally, crimp with the factory crimp die...early in the first die you need to add a new primer, that's easy with most progressive presses but some de-prime in a separate step, then prime...Read any of the several books available, they will do you more good, then ask questions...The thing that holds the shell is called "shell holder" don't know why but it seems to be the best name...on a progressive press, like Dillon, that would be called a shell plate.
 

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Stop trying to short circuit and circumvent the process and go get Lyman 50th Edition loading manual, The ABC's of Reloading and one of the major bullet maker manuals; Hornady, Sierra, Speer etc. If you want just one...which is never adequate...get the Lyman. Read the first 1/3, 3 TIMES.....THEN ask your questions. I know you're new but you can go a long way toward educating yourself with one of those archaic things called a book. Regardless of what the under 40 crowd thinks, they're still the most viable for many things in many ways. Handloading is one of the many things where instant gratification will get you hurt, bad.
 

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A - get a copy of ABC's of Reloading
B - read it 3 times. Each section may be reread multiple times, in understanding and knowing the content of that section.
C - obtain Lyman Reloading and bullet manufacturer manual (I have Hornady and Nosier, both excellent). Read. Read, and then study.

Dies come in complete sets. You will need a scale, brass, primers, powder and bullets. As listed in the manuals.

Reloading is not hard.
Reloading SAFE, RELIABLE, ACCURATE ammo requires knowledge and patience.

Welcome to the obsession.
 

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Reloading is a nice, relaxing hobby. Don't rush it. If you don't have the patience to read a manual and take the time to understand the complete process, it may not be the hobby for you. Perform your due diligence, take your time, understand what each step does. Remember that there is a lot riding on what you are doing. I personally know a guy who blew up a rifle and has a mangled hand from it. He's lucky that he didn't lose his sight. It's not just about the ammo and saving money.
 

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My first reload was in 1982. Rifle ammo. I picked once fired .30-06 brass out of the trash barrel at the range.
Cleaned the necks w/0000 steel wool and wiped them off w/Windex. (I've also graduated to vibrator cleaners long ago.)
For rifle cartridges:
Take your brass to a shop that sells dies and say, "This is what I want to reload." A 2 die set for a bottle-necked case is sufficient. The 2 die set will size and decap the brass and at this stage you can prime the case. Sometime after decapping, the cases may also be cleaned - vibratory cleaner or sonic.)
The next die is a seating die, which seats a bullet to your desired depth and crimp if needed. You are choosing the seating depth! Yes, you have to determine at what depth to seat. A basic way is to seat bullet in a sized, but empty case(w/o the primer), color the bullet with black magic marker can chamber it. A bullet with rifling/lands marks on it, is too long. Turn down your seating die and try again.
An alternative is to pickup a Hornady comparitor and measure the "jam" dimension of each bullet for that caliber. I like Redding dies, but also have RCBS.
Remember the seating depth is for your rifle and a specific bullet.

Next: Cases should be lubed prior to inserting into sizing die. I use a spray lube. Got rid of the dirty green pad 25 years ago. Lay cases down on a piece of clean newspaper and spray toward the case mouth, but do not spray into the case mouth. Roll cases over and spray again. You can do 50-100 cases at one time. Cases should feel slightly greasy. Do not spray into the primer pockets.
(Not enough lube means a stuck case. Buy a stuck case remover. We learn by doing.)

Next: Brass - size all brass and trim to the correct "trim to length" as shown in the manual. Chamfer case mouths. ( Note: I like Forster trimmer and pilots for each caliber. You will need a Vernier caliper to check case lengths. Buy a stainless steel one with an dial gauge. I avoid the batteries for obvious reasons. Lyman sells inside and outside chamfering tools.)
Brass prep can extend to primer pocket reaming, and flash hole deburring, so it depends on how far you want to go.

Next: powder dispenser, powder scale, powder tickler, and powder funnel. On the powder thrower, adjust it on the light side and trickle to top it off, while on the scale. Use a bullet tray to assemble the cases, before dropping powder. Start at the middle to lower end of the powder range. Charge the case and seat a bullet, and check with a the comparitor. Adjust seating die as required.

Crimping: your choice. I have never crimped a bottle necked rifle cases - .30-06, .270, .25-06, .243,
.22-250, or .223 have never gotten crimped.
All off the above have been done on a Pacific press bought in 1982.
Primers - stick to one brand. A rifle group will shift by only changing out a primer.
I like Federal SR or LR, because they feed will in my press due to finish. Do not use pistol primers in rifle cases. Primer seating should produce a primer slightly below the base of the case - meaning no high primers are allowed.

Record what you are doing - a spiral notebook works. Keep your targets. Even the crappy ones - let's not repeat the crappy loads. Keep track of wind and other shooting conditions when you shoot. I use a 2" black square with a 1" white square as my 100yd target. All my targets go in a file folder - one is "good" the other is "crappy". It keeps me from repeating history.

Pistol case reloading: Usually 3 die sets, go for a Dillon 550 if you do a lot of shooting. Bolt the Dillon to a board and C-clamp it to a work bench when you want to reload. You will need to crimp pistol rounds.
 

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That is a great post Mackie - for someone who knows even a little something about reloading. It appears that Imbearwolf70 knows nothing about it, so everything you said is Greek to him. What's a lube, what do you mean by size, what are all these "powder things" you mention? I understand it and you understand it, but I don't think the OP has the foggiest idea, he doesn't seem to know what dies to get to load his for his guns. He needs to read some manuals before we hit him with the specific things that need to happen.
 

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GET THE manuals. I like the Lyman Manual the most. It tells you bullet length, powder charge, case length, etc. I know the reloading manuals don't have much of a plot but by reading them you'll start to see how it's done. Side note always check your shell cases after powder charge, you DON'T want a double charge.
 

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This sounds like what I was told here about 8 months ago.

All very good information.

Had I read and listened I would not have blown up my new Henry rifle.

Do like they say.

Buy several manuals, read said manuals then ask all your question.

DO NOT RELOAD ANYTHING UNTIL YOU COMPLETELY UNDESTAND THE PROCESS.
 

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This sounds like what I was told here about 8 months ago.

All very good information.

Had I read and listened I would not have blown up my new Henry rifle.

Do like they say.

Buy several manuals, read said manuals then ask all your question.

DO NOT RELOAD ANYTHING UNTIL YOU COMPLETELY UNDESTAND THE PROCESS.
Nooooo not your Henry!Say it isn’t so.You can easily put a double charge in a .357 shell.
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E175E225-B7AB-424D-B0D7-A2627687EBD9.gif 1
 

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You might want to buy a manual or two to start with and then read them.

For 7mm.08, you need 7mm.08 dies.
For 7mm Magnum, you need 7mm Magnum dies.
For .45 ACP, you need .45 ACP dies.
I guess you mean .300 Weatherby Magnum and if so, you need 300 Weatherby magnum dies.

Good luck with your endeavor!
I'm going to correct this a bit. Just any 7mm mag dies won't do. hatever dies you get need to be for the cartridge you are loading. Number of different 7mm mag's.
 

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That part I know I need the dies ,like I said I'm new
But I don't know the names of them like the one that pushes the bullet,to the shell,the one that I guess cuts the top of the shell and squeezes it smaller ,and the one that holds it in place ,is there a complet set that does all that?
The one that push's the bullet into the shell is seating the bullet, called a bullet seating die. The one that resizes the case is called the sizing die. A number of different dies can do this but I strongly suggest getting a standard full length sizing die. Don't know what to tell you about crimp dies Been doing handguns for a lot of years and crimp my bullet's with the seater die, read instructions. Any dies you get for rifle at this point should be two die set's, handgun three die set's. First go get a manual I always suggest one from the maker of the bullet's you want to use. And I suggest only one. Everything you need to get started s in the manuals. Every one of them will tell you pretty much the same thing too But they tell it differently and for a new guy that can be confusing! Get one and add to it down the road.

This is a fairly simple task, the guy doing t normally makes the problem. Learn first to make good safe rounds and when your there, then spread out!
 

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Mr. bearwolf hasn't been back in 18 hours. Don't know if that means he's busy or offended.
 
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