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I am not new to shooting, but very new to reloading. I am interested in getting into this heavy, but I do not know where to start (which kits, presses, primers, cases, etc.). I am also not sure the best places to shop for the above mentioned. Do I make my own bench? Basement or garage? Where to store materials? Etc..

I would be looking to reload 5.7 x 28, and other pistol cartridges as well as some rifle.

Any and all comments, help is welcomed and appreciated.

I would also be interested in purchasing items from some members that may be selling some of their equipment, materials off.
 

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Start with a good book or two on reloading. I have a Hornady progressive press, Lyman digital scale, some Lee dies. If you are going in, you eventually will, too. I don't think there is an incorrect brand. I just depends on how you want proceed. Welcome to the forum!
 

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Ray, first off welcome to the forum. You should get a pile of replies.

I've been reloading/handloading since 1961. I honestly believe the first, best thing you can do is get 1, 2 or 3 different loading manuals and read, re-read and digest the first approximately 1/3 of all them. Therein will lay the answer to a lot of questions you will have. I'd recommend the Lyman 50th edition as a must have. After that I find the Hornady very good and Speer nearly its equal. After that, though I've never read it and don't have it, many recommend "The ABC's of Reloading." It must be good because many whose opinions I respect recommend it.

I'm a firm believer one should start with a single stage press. You will have to go slow and you will learn much about die adjustment, bullet seating, case sizing and belling....it's just a good way to learn without having to pay attention to a lot of things going on at once.

Again, welcome and good luck!
 

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I would start with a Lee anniversary kit. It's an inexpensive single stage press and comes with everything you have to have. I would suggest a hand priming tool like the RCBS instead of priming on the press. It's faster and you get a better feel for when the primer is seated. It will get you started and you can upgrade as you go.
 

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Eh...just musing out loud....I built my benches as well and, I suspect many, if not most, do. As far as where to load, it's a sedentary activity so it should probably be in a climate controlled area if you want to load year round, depending on your climate.

Reloading equipment is tools made of steel or cast iron mostly. They need to be cared for like the precision tools they are. Ergo, moisture/humidity is your enemy. Basement, shop, detached or otherwise, is fine so long as you loading tools are cared for. As Gudakis said and others on the board do, a spare bedroom is used. WillieB has his so consolidated he can keep it all in a tote box. I believe there is one member who usues a spare closet. Your imagination is your friend.
 

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I agree with Sharps first post completely. Two or three manuals is almost a must and that first 1/3 of the manuals have important information that will "teach" you what you need to start your reloading. I do have to say that this is not the best time to start ANYTHING that has to do with shooting, to include and especially reloading. There does not seem to be ANY components available, except some bullets.

I will tell you from experience that 5.8X28 is the most difficult cartridge that I have ever tried to reload . Every gun that fires that cartridge is blowback, except single shots, and the shoulder is thrown forward almost a 1/4 inch and is rounded. That creates an extremely difficult problem with getting the shoulder back into enough shape to fire it back in one of those blowback guns. I have owned both the PS-90 and a FiveSeven and I now own a Ruger57. All three guns do the same thing to the shoulder of the brass. I do own a single shot Contender that keeps the brass in its original configuration (with a shoulder).
 

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I appreciate the responses so far. Where do most of you go to buy kits, brass, primers, powders, bullets, etc.?
There's the key...what's available in your local area? The internet vendors are pretty picked over...very scarce supplies. My local shops (Southwest Ohio) have kits available, but it's luck of the draw, not a lot of selection, and no price competition. Primers and dies are probably the hardest things to find right now. Your best bet may be to find someone in your local area willing to donate some to get started.
Projectiles are beginning to appear again, but you may need to wait weeks to months to get your orders...or pay spot prices which tend to be higher.

My GoTo is Everglades Ammo for projectiles, limited brass.
My Brass GoTo is AmmoBrass, but they are well backed up. The obvious choice, Starline Brass, is slowly adding product back to their site.

This is totally off the wall, but there are active reloading communities on MeWe (alternate social media) that have folks selling nearly everything...but these are all person to person...so depending on your trust factor.

You'll find folks on this forum also very willing to help new loaders to get started.
 

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Ray, first off welcome to the forum. You should get a pile of replies.

I've been reloading/handloading since 1961. I honestly believe the first, best thing you can do is get 1, 2 or 3 different loading manuals and read, re-read and digest the first approximately 1/3 of all them. Therein will lay the answer to a lot of questions you will have. I'd recommend the Lyman 50th edition as a must have. After that I find the Hornady very good and Speer nearly its equal. After that, though I've never read it and don't have it, many recommend "The ABC's of Reloading." It must be good because many whose opinions I respect recommend it.

I'm a firm believer one should start with a single stage press. You will have to go slow and you will learn much about die adjustment, bullet seating, case sizing and belling....it's just a good way to learn without having to pay attention to a lot of things going on at once.

Again, welcome and good luck!
Ray,
I started reloading a few years ago. I knew I would be low volume so I still use a single stage press. (Bought used at a pawn shop for $25)

Read a lot and ask questions was the way I started. It works.
 

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Ray- IMO this is an awful time to jump into the reloading game...just like quite a few guys (gals) on TFF I've been reloading for quite a few years (since 1974). You'll find it quite easy to buy reloading equipment...places like Sportsman's Warehouse, Bass Pro, and some local sports shops and gun shops....it's the darn components that are hard to come buy, and the prices of them if found...I sometimes have to 'rub my eyes' when I visit on- line retailers and see the prices they are getting for components. Let me just say it's some crazy times right now...you'll have a substantial amount of $$$ invested getting into reloading at this time...but granted it is a rewarding activity.. I reload for for 5 different rifle calibers, and 7 different handgun calibers, and over the years have purchased this & that , sold several items to upgrade equipment and still keep an eye out for additional 'stuff' at gun shows ,estate sales, and the like. If you do jump in remember the suggestions stated and if you have further questions (and you will) you've found a good place to ask right here on TFF...and welcome to the forum... :) (y)
 

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This is a bad time to get into reloading. I was looking to upgrade to a progressive a few months ago and everybody was sold out or the prices were ridiculous. Your biggest problem is going to be finding dies, especially if you want to reload common calibers like 9 MM and 5.56/.223. Reloading components like powder and primers are getting hard to find too.
 

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Great advice from everyone but I have to ditto on the bad timing.

The problem is you might get set up and ready to go and find the already non-existent components really frustrating and possibly causing you to lose interest.

Used equipment is crazy right now and I can't believe some of the prices I see for it. I guess if you are still committed I would stick with new from a reputable store who is not 'inflating' prices.

On the positive side if you are patient you can get set up and start processing brass which is something that needs to be done anyway and in the interim you could possibly process a lot of brass and have it ready to go when you do find components.

I am hearing reports from people who are stumbling on some components they are finding in stores so maybe the shortages are beginning to 'soften' up.

It is no doubt bad right now but eventually we will start to see the 'overlap' by which people will start finding components and buying equally with the 'scalpers' - and the scalpers will start to see there $100/K primer sales (or ammo sales as well) start to slow down.

Only so many people are going to pay these prices for primers or ammo and if they are paying these prices they are only buying the bare necessities.
 

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Ray, first off welcome to the forum. You should get a pile of replies.

I've been reloading/handloading since 1961. I honestly believe the first, best thing you can do is get 1, 2 or 3 different loading manuals and read, re-read and digest the first approximately 1/3 of all them. Therein will lay the answer to a lot of questions you will have. I'd recommend the Lyman 50th edition as a must have. After that I find the Hornady very good and Speer nearly its equal. After that, though I've never read it and don't have it, many recommend "The ABC's of Reloading." It must be good because many whose opinions I respect recommend it.

I'm a firm believer one should start with a single stage press. You will have to go slow and you will learn much about die adjustment, bullet seating, case sizing and belling....it's just a good way to learn without having to pay attention to a lot of things going on at once.

Again, welcome and good luck!
i could not have said it better!

rick
 

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Read this
 

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Buy good stuff in the beginning. You can certainly make good ammo by pinching a penny here and another penny there, but that may be false economy. You may read about people bashing certain brands and praising others. There is generally a reason for the bashing and for the praise. You might want to take note of what is being written. All brands will work, but you will probably be more satisfied with some brands than with others in the long run.

Also keep in mind that the rigging costs more than the hull. The amount of money you hopefully will put into components over the years will make any extra cost required to buy good equipment fade into oblivion. I just finished a few minutes ago putting together some 45 Colt loads on my $450 Dillon press. I took brass from a $150 box from Starline, bullets from a $70 box of Laser Cast, powder from a $130 jug of Unique, and primers from a $30 brick of WLP. Except for the brass, those components will be gone soon, but the press will be with me for the rest of my life. I still have and use the Lyman single stage press I bought in the 1960's and the Rock Chucker I got in the 1980's.

It is a wonderful activity. Enjoy it and be safe.
 

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Buy good stuff in the beginning. You can certainly make good ammo by pinching a penny here and another penny there, but that may be false economy. You may read about people bashing certain brands and praising others. There is generally a reason for the bashing and for the praise. You might want to take note of what is being written. All brands will work, but you will probably be more satisfied with some brands than with others in the long run.

Also keep in mind that the rigging costs more than the hull. The amount of money you hopefully will put into components over the years will make any extra cost required to buy good equipment fade into oblivion. I just finished a few minutes ago putting together some 45 Colt loads on my $450 Dillon press. I took brass from a $150 box from Starline, bullets from a $70 box of Laser Cast, powder from a $130 jug of Unique, and primers from a $30 brick of WLP. Except for the brass, those components will be gone soon, but the press will be with me for the rest of my life. I still have and use the Lyman single stage press I bought in the 1960's and the Rock Chucker I got in the 1980's.

It is a wonderful activity. Enjoy it and be safe.

I'm still using an aluminum Lee single stage press I bought in 1980.
 
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