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Discussion Starter #1
ok, i am totally new to reloading. just got a s&w sd 40. at the cost of ammo, i will be looking into reloading. what do i need to get to reloading .40s&w ammo?
 

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Start out by reading the last sticky above. If you are already loading some ammo, then you should already have a manual and a press. You will need dies, bullets, brass, powder, and primers. If you have never reloaded before, then you need to add a press, scales, and some (more than one) reloading manuals. There are dozens of other thing that you might possibly need or want. The absolute first thing is the MANUALS and read them!!
 

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Step one is a solid reloading manual, the Lyman 49th would be my suggestion. Read it and then research equipment, I dont recommend .40 as a first cartrige, not impossible per se, just requires a tad more attention.
 

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Step one is a solid reloading manual, the Lyman 49th would be my suggestion. Read it and then research equipment, I dont recommend .40 as a first cartrige, not impossible per se, just requires a tad more attention.
Why is that? is it because its the same dies as 10mm??
 

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dont get just one manual get another at minimum and keep getting them. im a noob too and manuals make shopping easier.

trays
bullet puller
manual
scale
lube
calipers
die (of course)
shell holder (if needed)
another manual (definetly)
powder
bullet
primer
shell
dont go shopping til you make a list ( a must)
and of course another manual!!!!
 

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Why is that? is it because its the same dies as 10mm??
A semi-auto cartridge is a bit more involved than a revolver cartridge for reloading. Feeding and chambering must be considered and proper bullet sizing, finished case dimensions, over all cartridge length must all be within tolerances to function in a semi-auto. For a revolver, if the cartridge fits in the chamber/cylinder, it's usually good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks, why .40s&w ? because that's the gun I bought! will definitely be reading all I can get. I will need the whole set up but will have to do it a step at a time
 

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Seriously, start out with at least one manual and do read it. Someone suggested the Lyman #49 and I think that is a really good one to start with. The first 1/3 of the book tells you a whole lot about reloading. In the second chapter it has a list of what equipment you will need and it tells you what each piece of equipment is used for..
 

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I suggest going on eBay or some of the companies that you will find online and buying a reloading kit. It will be a little less expensive in the beginning and you can upgrade components as you can afford to, as you upgrade you can sell the other pieces. Also get a digital scale. They are fairly inexpensive and make it a lot easier to check your powder charges and bullet weights. Check and recheck your charges. Use load data from a manual as some people use a hotter load and not all guns can handle them. I went with a lee load master progressive loader. They are a little hard to set up but once setup they are good. When you get your loader check you tube for help setting it up, just search for setup of which ever loader you go with.
 

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thanks, why .40s&w ? because that's the gun I bought! will definitely be reading all I can get. I will need the whole set up but will have to do it a step at a time
its all here on this site (best reloading forum on the web), look at the stickys and use the search, then ask questions... there are many reloading experts on here and if you have put in the effort but cant find your answer you will have many folks on here more than willing to help you out, but they wont spoon feed you...
 

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One more thing you will need is an inertia hammer to take apart the bullets that are out of spec to re-use. You'll probably have a few bullets like that as you learn the process.
 

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any guesses on total cost? will buy used equipment is that would be reliable.
Your initial cost of starting up is going to be a little high. You can find places that sell kits that will give you a good start on the stuff you will need to start up. Here is a good starting point: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/82...-anniversary-kit-with-modern-reloading-manual A lot of people will bash Lee stuff because they are inexpensive but I am still using the same press (just about like the one shown) since I started loading about 35+ years ago.

YOu can find a lot of used stuff on eBay or Amazon, but watch out and don't get caught up in the "auction" and pay more than it is worth.
 

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I just started about 2 months ago. I got a Hornaday single stage press kit on ebay.About 500 something. You can find them as there are lots of them. It comes with everything including a manual. But I also bought the Lyman one they are talking about. I got different scales than the one that came with it and then sold it on ebay :)
Your dies are going to take some waiting on as most places say out of stock on the website. Unless your ok with paying about twice as much on ebay. Bullets can be found ,, especially the lead ones. Primers and powder,,,,let us know if you find someone online that has any. It is like gold!!!! Hard to find unless you get lucky . Brass fired one time can be found. It seems everytime you turn around you see a you tube video or see someone talking about something you say to yourself hmmmmm I might like that . CHA CHING $$ I have about a total of close to 800 to 900 invested in it. 500 something for the press starter kit and all the other stuff that you seem to want or gotta have.
The guys here have been great and have helped me out alot. Just earlier this week I had alot of help with a 9mm problem I was having and got alot of great help from everyone here. Watch you tube videos.You will find a ton of info there.

Maybe hard to find used equipment as everyone is wanting to get into this reloading thing. Best to buy a complete starter kit then add to it.
 

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Blackbird94 - it won't take you long to recoup your investment in reloading equipment at today's ammo prices, and I fully agree with your thinking. I recently decided to embark on the reloading path, and here's what I've found, for what it's worth to you.

I bought a RCBS Turret Press for about $350 with shipping - it's well worth it to be able to set up dies for two or three cartridges on one platform. Unfortunately, spare turrets are outrageously priced at around $50 - Lee charges $10 - $15 for theirs.

The first die set I bought was a RCBS in .243 Win, since that's my primary cartridge, but a lack of availability has driven me to buy whatever I can find in stock ever since. My .30-30 Win dies are from Hornady, as are my 9mm Luger dies, since I could find those when I needed them. I feel a bit like a traitor for saying so, but I think I like the Hornady dies better than the RCBS sets. For one thing, the .30-30 set came with the shell holder included in the box; I had to buy a separate shell holder from RCBS for my .243 set. Oddly, the Hornady 9mm set didn't include a shell holder, but it did include a separate bullet seating stem for flat-nosed bullets, which I don't think RCBS includes in their sets.

I've spent between $35 and $50 for each die set, and I don't really have any complaint about any of them - quality of machining is excellent in all cases, and I'm happy with my investment.

My press was part of a kit, and I strongly recommend that you start with such a kit, then add to it as you better understand your needs. Mine came with a powder measure, and a powder scale, a primer tray, a nifty widget for standing up cartridges as I reload them, and various tools to make the job easier.

Since the initial purchase I've added a vibratory case cleaner, but I didn't buy any media as it's much cheaper at a pet store; look for bird litter, and you'll find cheap ground walnut shells and corn cobs at a fraction of the price charged by reloading companies. It's even cheaper if you check prices at auto repair supply places for body work abrasives...

The hardest thing I've had to deal with so far is finding components. Primers and powder are a nightmare to find, and brass is only a little easier. It used to be that you could walk through a popular shooting area and pick up 50 lbs of brass for nothing, but nowadays people are grabbing their own litter and taking it home with them - not a bad thing!:D

But it's a little rough on us scavengers. I lucked out and scored a few thousand large rifle primers last week, but I only have one pound of powder on hand and can't find more. I have 5,000 small pistol primers on order, but who knows when that order might be filled? My best advice is to find a vendor you trust - there are a lot of scammers out there, so be careful - place your order, and hope that Obama and his ilk will quietly retire soon. Not a high probability, I know, but hope springs eternal.

Good luck, and welcome to the ultimate do-it-yourself club. It's a pleasant hobby, and quite enjoyable, when the needed parts can be found.:banghead:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
awesome help everyone! now to start shopping around to see whats available. Will update as I progress through this. Thanks again
 

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Been reloading for over 50 years. When people tell you to read the manuals, do it. Once you think you have absorbed everything written. Read the manuals again. And always and I mean always, refer back to the manuals.
 

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Personally, I'm not a fan of kits. Many kits add stuff you'll never use just to up the "parts list". I got my equipment one or two pieces at a time. Actually a Lee Loader first, then a single stage w/dies and a scale. I didn't get a bullet puller for several years into my reloading (I paid very close attention to everything I did and tossed "questionable" rounds in a coffee can to be dealt with later). I liked to research each piece of equipment before I bought it and wasn't brand loyal; I got whichever tool I thought was best for me. I read a lot about reloading and made decisions based on my limited experience, what I read and common sense. Another "tool" for research are catalogs from reloading supply houses (Midway, Natchez, Graf's, etc.) to see what tools were available. You can get started for less than $100.00 or go with an over $500.00 kit. My first "kit" was a Lee Loader ($19.00), a pound of Bullseye (about $12.00 ?), some CCI primers ($2.00 per C ?), generic lead bullets ($9.95 per C), a $.79 mallet, and free brass. My first press was a used C-H for $13.00 and my second press was a Redding Boss @ about $129.00. So, it's up to you to decide how much you are willing to spend to get started...

But first lay in those mentioned texts/manuals and read 'em.
 
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