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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, all.

I recently inherited 2 IJ revolvers. I think one is a .32 and the other a .38 cal.

Their condition is average...the finishes are worn, but smooth. Action is tight, etc.

The patent of the .32 says APR.6.86.FEB.15.87.MAY.10.87.MAR.13.88AUG.25.96 on the butt of the gun and the serial number K5357 inside the handle under the grip.
The patent of the .38 is worn, but I think it says JUNE16 96.AUG26.SEPT15.04 on the butt, and serial number C24713 inside the handle under the grip and under the trigger guard.

I have heard that some of the older ones are for black powder ammunition only. What ammunition can be safely used in these two revolvers? For that matter, how old are they? What generation/model? Would it make good financial sense to get them blued?
I really appreciate any insight. Thanks! Iron Metal Household hardware Iron Metal Household hardware Brown Office equipment Electric blue Writing implement Beige Finger Nail Gadget Carmine Trigger Grey Metal Iron Revolver Iron Metal Air gun Gun accessory Stationery Beige Office supplies Metal Office instrument Khaki Tan Metal Beige Leather Metal Iron Steel Pipe Revolver
 

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I can't give but I can tell you the one with the coil spring can handle smokeless/modern ammo after it's been okayed by a gunsmith. As for the one with the flat spring under the grip no no. It's a black powder frame and as such should never see modern ammo. Rebluing them? You end up spending more on them then they'd be worth when finished so no, it wouldn't make financial sense.
 

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The smaller revolver is a 2nd Model 3rd Variation Safety Hammer Automatic Revolver made in 1904, chambered in .32 S&W. It is considered a black powder frame and not safe for modern smokeless ammo. You can still find black powder .32 S&W ammo online. That being said, if you fire black powder ammo, you must disassemble the gun completely and clean it as you would any black powder muzzleloader. If you don’t clean it properly it will corrode and rust up on you.

The larger revolver is a 3rd Model Safety Hammer Automatic Revolver made in 1910, chambered in .38 S&W (NOT .38 Special). It is considered a smokeless frame and should be safe for modern smokeless ammo after you have it checked out by a competent gunsmith.

I would not recommend rebluing these as Firpo pointed out. Often the value of Iver Johnson is not monetary rather as a heirloom. It’s a shame the barrel of the 2nd Model was cut down. That reduced any collectability since the longer barrels revolvers have a higher collectability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The smaller revolver is a 2nd Model 3rd Variation Safety Hammer Automatic Revolver made in 1904, chambered in .32 S&W. It is considered a black powder frame and not safe for modern smokeless ammo. You can still find black powder .32 S&W ammo online. That being said, if you fire black powder ammo, you must disassemble the gun completely and clean it as you would any black powder muzzleloader. If you don't clean it properly it will corrode and rust up on you.

The larger revolver is a 3rd Model Safety Hammer Automatic Revolver made in 1910, chambered in .38 S&W (NOT .38 Special). It is considered a smokeless frame and should be safe for modern smokeless ammo after you have it checked out by a competent gunsmith.

I would not recommend rebluing these as Firpo pointed out. Often the value of Iver Johnson is not monetary rather as a heirloom. It's a shame the barrel of the 2nd Model was cut down. That reduced any collectability since the longer barrels revolvers have a higher collectability.
I can't give but I can tell you the one with the coil spring can handle smokeless/modern ammo after it's been okayed by a gunsmith. As for the one with the flat spring under the grip no no. It's a black powder frame and as such should never see modern ammo. Rebluing them? You end up spending more on them then they'd be worth when finished so no, it wouldn't make financial sense.
Thank you folks for the info and insight. Truly grateful. God bless you and God Bless America
 
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