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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a Spanish Mauser from a friend who was hard up for cash as a restoration candidate for a fairly decent price due to his situation. I consider it a restoration candidate because of his "cleaning up" of the metal. It seems as though he has scrubbed the **** out all the metal parts with a green scour pad or steel wool.

If I could get a bit of details on the rifle from some experienced collectors I would be very grateful. I have been doing internet research for the last two nights and aside from a plethora of history I have hit a dead end. So far it seems that I have a 1916 short (21") rifle with a 1893 bolt and a 1931 date stamp. One of the things that puzzles me is the round bottom bolt. Any more information would be welcome so that I may order the correct parts. I am attaching some pictures.

I could also use some advice on fixing this old gun up. It does not seem to be a Chinese copy and assuming it turns out to truly not be, I was thinking of having the metal parts re-blued, and getting a new stock, but also considering getting it parkerized unless it would prevent it from operating correctly.
 

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just my opinion but from the pics I see, I would take the stock off and clean all of the old oils and finish off of it, do a little very light sanding with some 0000 steel wool and put a few fresh coast of BLO (boiled linseed oil) on it.

get it stripped, clean it up some, make sure it functions, put the stock back on it and shoot it.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will probably end up doing just that.
Any experts out there know anything else about my collection of parts on this rifle?
 

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You rifle is a Spanish Mauser Model of 1916, with a mismatched Model of 1893 bolt. Not very common, but something that you sometimes see on surplus rifles. The correct bolt for a Spanish 1916 is bolt with a turn down handle. The modifications to the long Model of 1893, were due to combat experiences adquired by Spanish forces fighting (at the time) in North Africa (Morroco). The rifle was considered too long and the carbine innefective. In reality the main complain was with the Spanish Carbine (Model of 1895), which had no provision to attach a bayonet. The Spanish 1916, was intended to replace both the long rifle (Mauser 93) and the carbine (Mauser 95) with a handy and effective short rifle. There is plenty of surplus Spanish 1916 type bolts in the market, the problem is headspacing. When you replace bolts, you need to check for proper headspacing. In the case of this rifle, it will not be a bad idea as the bolt that it currently has most likely was a latter addition. Your rifle also has the ring modifications for venting gases in case of a pierced primer. Little known to many shooters is that the older small ring mausers will direct gases straight to the shooters face (and your eyes), in the case of a ruptured primer. In the past this was a fairly common ocurrance, that's the reason the Large Ring 98 Mauser was improved with a gas deflector at the rear of the action. The spanish military tried to solve the problem on the small ring mausers by venting the actions. The modification will vent most but not all gases in case of a pierced primer. Use proper eye protection when shooting, in particular with pre 98 actions. To check for headspacing, any competent gunsmith can do it, or get a go, and no go gauge in 7mm Mauser from Brownells.
 
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