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The instructions for my Nikon BDC coycote scope says that the factory setting for the BDC circles is designed for a 55gr/3200 fps round, that you can change the weight of the bullet but the velc. should stay the same, of course you would have to adjust the scope for a different wt. but that the other two circles would be on by design. Does anyone have any experience with the Nikon BDC scopes?
 

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I have two NiKon BDC scopes, I have owned them for several years. I had one on my 700VTR .308 rifle, which I traded off. I now have it on my Ruger American in .308. If I remember right, the instructions do not tell what bullet it was designed for (that I can remember anyway). They do say that once you zero the cross hair for 100 yards, then the first "o" would be dead on at 200 yards and the second "o" would be dead on at something like 250 yards. I have found that what they say is simply not the truth. It was more like 100, 150, and 200 yards. I normally load a 168 grain Sierra bullet and that may be the reason, maybe the scope was designed for a 150 grain bullet. The scope boxes are up in the attic so I am not climbing up there to verify what I just said. It does make a little sense to me that the bullet weight and velocity would tend to effect the impact point of the bullet in relation to the little "o" in the scope.
 

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you need a smartphone and the Nikon spot on app. You simply enter your specific load information and the app calculates the exact ranges your dots are good for at differing magnification settings too.
 

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I have the Nikon 223 scope with BDC

IIRC it comes factory preset for a 55 gr
Nikon has an awesome website you can go onto and enter your specific information and you can print out a custom reticle/BDC for that situation
 

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The Nikon web site here http://nikonhunting.com/spoton/ will allow you to specify your specific scope model, zero distance, bullet weight, and velocity. It will then show the distances each circle represents. It seems to be reasonably accurate for .223 and .22 LR. if you know the velocity and the distance to the target.

I have the .22 rimfire model and it is a very good scope. It's bright and clear and the adjustments are pretty accurate. One of the guys in our gun club has the Coyote 4.5 - 14 on his .223 and that is an impressive scope.
 

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Nothing tops your own dope chart. The BDC reticles are hit and miss. Either way a fair amount of range time is required to validate their accuracy, best figuring out your bullet drop and applying the reticle to your real world findings.
 

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I am a big fan of Nikon stuff, but I would tend to lean towards 312shooter on this one. A good mildot scope and a working knowledge of the balistics of the round your shooting would seem easier than putting some Nikon gimmic between you and the reality of physics. The scope can not make a marksmen, but a marksman should be able to use a good mildot scope understanding all he needs to know by looking through one; distance, windage and point of aim.

The 100 yard point of aim is more problematic for both the .223 and .308 rounds then the scope. The rounds are considerably flat out to 200 yards when sighted there, often < 2 inches in rise at 100 yards even in a .308. Either way, it is still a kill shot. Personally, I feel the rounds are better suited for maybe a 300 yard point of aim, as the rise would still be manageable at the closer ranges for a kill shot even with iron sights because your not covering the target with the front sight post. With the BDC sighted at 100 yards you are now covering the target with the "little o's"???

Can ya all tell I am a fan of iron sights when practicable; they don't eat nothing, they don't get bumped and they don't need to be resighted over the course of their life. At any rate, like 312 said, you'll need the range time with the rounds you intend to use; just no way around it however you go.

The BDC is a hunting scope, and I guess it has its place in the market. But, a 100 yard point of aim on a 30-30 hunting rifle with iron sights doesn't even make any sense; even that lobbed round can handle a 150 to 200 yard point of aim and still make kill shots under 100 yards with the same point of aim.

A good mildot scope can be taken off one caliber rifle and used straight away on another caliber rifle in the same manner; so long as you know the different balistics of the two rounds. That's the difference between a Nikon gimmic and something that is practicable, like a mildot scope. A milirand is a milirand, and it don't matter between load to load or caliber to caliber except for the balistics.

The math on a mildot scope is pretty simple, and can be done on paper or even in ones head without much training. I don't mean to sound tort, but it don't take no app or the asking of Nikon what was going on in their heads when... Mildots are also straight forward in doing such calculations as compansating for wind and even different elevation shots wheather up hill or down. Try loading that into their app... And yes, they are a fully capible of accurately finding range in a rudimenatry way.

Yea, I am new to the board and I just joined. To those that own and like the BDC's, sorry no tort ment; not my cup of tea from Nikon. I'll give ya some personal advise Deadon, sell/trade it off for a good mildot that can and will make you a better shooter and hunter. For a small learning curve now, the benifits will long out weight any money lost in the exchange from what you have.

Like what 312 is alluding to, there is no getting away from the balistics of the round you are shooting with at know distances; at the rifle range or in the field. When the round leaves the barrel take advantage of all the goodie that the balistics a round and caliber has to offer you; when they start droping below the point of aim they go down hill a lot faster from there. A cheap 12 guage rifled slug barrel is capable of a 100 yard point of aim for Christ's sake, and any modern rifle cartridges are surely capable of quite a bit more accuracy and distance than that.

And don't cover the target up with anything sight wise (like the little o's)...that is what and why they made 1/2 and full Buckhorn iron sights for. Let the flaming begin...:eek:
 
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