The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So this question came up today. I'm curious as to what everybody has to say. It's been my understanding that an M14 is selective fire. An M1A is the semi auto version of the M14, but I am told that no; there is such a thing as an M14 semi auto, and that M1A is actually a designation of a Springfield Armory M14 semi auto. So what say you all? Is a semi auto only M14 correctly called an M1A or what?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
41,338 Posts
When you remove the selector switch from an M14, it can only be fired semi-automatic. I would say the the M1A is indeed the semi-auto version of the M14.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,250 Posts
M1A is, I believe, a term trademarked by Springfield Armory, Inc. for their semi-auto version of the M14. Other outfits, Fulton Armory for instance, produce their own version of the M14 as a semi-auto only. The military version of the M14 was indeed selective fire - assuming the selector hadn't been locked, but I believe only a handful of civilian legal selective fire M14s were produced, possibly by Springfield Armory, Inc., though I'm not positive as to the manufacturer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,189 Posts
M14's are still around as 'semi auto only' making them non-NFA weapons, it simply involves welding the selector knob on semi.

but yes, the M1A is the civilian version much the same as an AR-15 is to an M16 or M4.

The big difference in parts is that the M1A has no selector or op rod locking piece as does the M14, so dissassembly is slightly different there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,066 Posts
The M1A is a semi-auto clone of the US Governement's selective fire M14 rifle. "M14" is the Government's designation for the military M14 rifle. The M1A is made by Springfield Armory, a commercial arms maker un-affiliated with the US Government. The name "M1A" is owned by today's Springfield Armory. It is just like any other clone of any other gun.

The confusion might be that at one time the Government had an armory by the name of Springfield that manufactured rifles for many decades for government uses. They closed that armory sometime after WWII. Today's Springfield Armory is a commercial concern that makes firearms and accessories, including the current M1A. While the names are the same, they are not the same entity.

A fellow worker was in the Army at the time the M14 was the Army's rifle of choice. He was not ever in combat. He said the selective fire lever was removed from all the M14 he saw at that time. They apparently did not trust the soldiers with a full auto 308 rifle. Strange!

LDBennett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,953 Posts
In the early/mid '60's the USMC ToE was that 1 member of each 4 man fire team would carry the selective fire M-14. The other 3 would have semi-auto. This was a compromise tactical decision designed to conserve ammo, and still provide the fire team with increased firepower when needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So basically it's like calling a generic tissue a "Kleenex"; everyone does it but it's not correct to call all semi auto only M14's an M1A as it's copyrighted by S.A. Would that sum it up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,280 Posts
My understanding is that when Springfield started making their semi version, they wanted to call it an M14. Government said NO, so they called it M1A. By the time the Chinese M14 semis started showing up, ten years or so later, the Government had changed their minds. That's why the Norinco M14 is an M14 while the Springfield one is a M1A.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,066 Posts
The "M1A" nomenclature is very reasonable as the M14, of which the M1A is a clone, was a Garand M1 design modified with a selective fire feature, a removable magazine, and a few other feature changes but was based on the Garand design. The M1A was also semi-auto only as was the Garand. Hence the "A" version. Makes sense if the Government would not allow the "M14" designation.

I wonder if there was really any conversation between the US Government and Norinco (China) about the"M14" designation or did the Chinese just do it like they do with all the things they illegally clone(??). Norinco was excluded from importation not too long after they started importation to the US and to this day can not import guns into the US, as far as I know. Most of the guns they imported were junk back then. But some were not too bad (1911 Norinco frames and slides were commonly used for customized 1911). The Chinese SKS's and AK's were only one step above a tin can, in my opinion and in my experience.

LDBennett
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top