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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Spacebook reloading forum has a pic of AR upper(in pieces) and sheared bolt...Apparently he did'nt clean out his powder measure and loaded 24.7gr of Unique instead of BLc....OOPS
 

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Love to see pics or a link.......
 

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One of the rules of reloading is to keep only one canister of powder on the bench during a reloading session. That implies that when done reloading, the powder in the measure goes back into the canister on the bench.

NEVER store powder in the powder measure. It is dangerous because you may not remember what powder is in the measure (as that guy did not) and the powder blackens the plastic storage tube so bad that you may not be able to see the level of the powder in it and load a few cartridges short of powder before noticing it is out of powder.

Reloading can be safe IF you follow the rules. Break the rules and you may get an exploded gun like that guy!

LDBennett
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agee 100% LD-when I started loading a long time ago,the friend that taught me drilled into my head to only have 1 powder on bench and put canister in back of loader so I knew what I was using...Good advice then and now..
 

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I reloaded the first time in the late 1960's but nothing more than helping friends and reload a few 30-30 cartridges for my gun with their guidance. When I got my first centerfire pistol in about 1985 one of those friends decided to reload some ammo for it so I went to his home. The first thing he did wrong was he had left powder in the measure and poured different powder on top of it. The powders were grossly different so he was able to notice it and salvage most of the powders. But he had more than one powder on the bench at one time, was not paying attention to what he was doing, and taught me a couple of lessons I never forgot (one powder on the bench at a time and PAY ATTENTION).

While shooting and reloading CAN BE safe they can also be dangerous. Over the years I have caught several misadventures in shooting and reloading before they turned into a bad situation because I paid attention. I have seen the results of those who under estimate the dangers. BE SAFE!!!

LDBennett
 

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These are the stories I don't enjoy hearing about when reloading. But they do help me remember how much I need to double check what I am doing.
 

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I am sure it has been mentioned before but what I do is this:
I use a label printer to make stick on label of all my powders-usually 2 or 3 for each powder and stick 'em on the jug.
When I fill the hopper I stick on one of the labels on the hopper and leave it there til I pour the unused powder back--overkill, probably but I ALWAYS have a label as to the powder.
If I would get pulled away unexpectedly there is never a doubt what is in the hopper.

Guess that is what being OCD does to you :))
 

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I have a reloading bench whose only purpose in life is reloading. When I start a reloading session I fill the powder measure and put only that powders can on the bench top. If I intend to change powders for any reason, the powder measure gets emptied into the only can on the bench and the can is put back in the storage area 12 feet from the reloading bench. A new can goes on the bench... and on and on. Only one can of powder is on the bench at one time, EVER.

If the session may go into another day the powder measure gets emptied and the can either left on the reloading bench alone or put back in storage.

I NEVER have more than one can of powder on the bench at one time and if I leave the area for more than a break or for lunch then the powder goes back in the can. Powder is never left in the measure unless I am using it. Any long term call away from the bench gets the powder put back in the can.

This is about safety! I have a limited number of different powders but that is still many as I reload for over 30 different cartridges. I do not ever want to get the wrong powder in the measure or mix two different powders in the measure. I even turn the label of the can on the bench so I can read it to be sure I'll not use the wrong powder. In over 25 years I have NEVER had a powder mistake. My early lesson at my friend's house has never been forgotten.

LDBennett
 

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I don't leave powder in the bin because it draws moisture when it's not sealed up.
I also don't have any other powder can on the bench when I'm loading so it doesn't get poured into the wrong can (which I learned the hard way).
 
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