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I don't have pics but I have a pre 999 H&R Sportsman made in 1936 IIRC and a Savage-Stevens 87B Probably made around 1940.
You don't have a camera in your phone?
Would be lovely to see your collection.
Sounds like a winner.
 

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I get that.
Maybe sometime when you're not feeling so lazy.....please.
 
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I sold my Nylon 66 a few years ago. I still have my CBC 66 clone. It shoots just as good as the Remington did. You have to be sure you don’t hold the stock too tight or put any kind of pressure on it or accuracy will suffer. Otherwise they are very accurate.
I have a CBC/FIE Nylon 66 copy as well. I got it for Christmas when I was 13 or 14. Came with a really cheap scope that broke the first time I tried to sight it in. Fortunately, the gun is a little better quality. It actually sat forgotten in a closet at my parent’s house for almost 30 years. Found it a few years ago while I was cleaning out some other stuff. Took it to a local gunsmith who tore it down, cleaned everything and put her back together. (After looking at the schematics online, there was no way I was doing it. :eek:) She shoots like a dream now.

I really need to take her out to the range again. Haven’t shot her since we moved a year ago. Too many other guns to play with. :D
 

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Nice collection, jar. :thumbsup:


When I was a kid, Stevens made an updated version of the old Favourite, called "crackshot".
I think the model # was 72.
Had an octagon barrel and it wasn't a take-down, but still a falling block .22 single.
I wanted one so bad, but my dad thought I was nuts.
Maybe my recent fascination with .22 singles might stem from still wanting that gun.
Thanks. Interestingly they all still work better (as does another oldie that somehow was absent on picture day) then either of my newer "modern" 22s and of the new ones my Rossi RB22 actually is more fun and more accurate than the Ruger 10/22 Takedown.
 

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Yours are not the first comments I've heard about the inaccuracies of the 10/22....of course, if you swap in all the "accurizing accessories", they're tack drivers.
My dad's old Mossberg from the 50's has always been a straight shooter, too.
 

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I'm not saying a 10/22 isn't accurate out of the box but there's accuracy and then there's accuracy. My 10/22 was the least accurate .22 rifle I've ever had. I had three Marlin model 60's, a Savage Stevens model 87B, a Marlin model 25 and a Henry Golden Boy when I had the 10/22 and they all shot circles around it. I gave the thing to my niece. It's sad when you have to spend 3 or 4 hundred bucks on top of the purchase price to get a rifle to shoot with one that costs almost a hundred bucks less.
 

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I'm not saying a 10/22 isn't accurate out of the box but there's accuracy and then there's accuracy. My 10/22 was the least accurate .22 rifle I've ever had. I had three Marlin model 60's, a Savage Stevens model 87B, a Marlin model 25 and a Henry Golden Boy when I had the 10/22 and they all shot circles around it. I gave the thing to my niece. It's sad when you have to spend 3 or 4 hundred bucks on top of the purchase price to get a rifle to shoot with one that costs almost a hundred bucks less.
And then there's the retards like me who drop the $1200 for an Anschutz 54 sporter and are so impressed that I would pay twice that again. The most accurate 22 I have ever shot.
 

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I wouldn't call it retarded but an Anschutz is a whole nother league. If I had that kind of money to spend I'd have one too.
 

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I get that.
Maybe sometime when you're not feeling so lazy.....please.
OK just for you lol Pics are dark because the lighting isn't great and I can't get full pics with my phone. Forgive the clutter I'm trying to get my reloading stuff unpacked and set up after a two year hiatus.



 

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I'm not saying a 10/22 isn't accurate out of the box but there's accuracy and then there's accuracy. My 10/22 was the least accurate .22 rifle I've ever had. I had three Marlin model 60's, a Savage Stevens model 87B, a Marlin model 25 and a Henry Golden Boy when I had the 10/22 and they all shot circles around it. I gave the thing to my niece. It's sad when you have to spend 3 or 4 hundred bucks on top of the purchase price to get a rifle to shoot with one that costs almost a hundred bucks less.
True.
"Accurate" could be defined as one minute of angle or one minute of a sheet of notebook paper with a big "X" drawn in the "middle".

...and the pictures are perfect.
Nice pair you've got there.
Thank you for doing that.
 
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Here are some more, BSA pump 22's. Pumps were very popular in the USA but there were very few made in other counties. I think these are the only of British manufacture and the only other I can think of is the Browning Trombone, but that had an American behind it.
BSA's.jpg


Two are tube feed and two clip in magazine fed, both missing the magazines when I got them, I looked for over 8 years for a magazine the would work without luck. A contact I had in New Zealand bought one and sent me pictures and dimensions of his original magazine.... so after a lot of work with a CAD program and with getting some sheetmetal laser cut = problem solved! The magazines feed without an issue.
IMG_20160428_114042_zpsp0sbuhkh.jpg

BSA  magazine old-new.jpg

BSA first magazine 007.jpg





BSA box mag pumps 001.jpg


The estimate of production of the box magazine fed version is just over 1000, probably why magazines are hard to find. The tube fed are estimated at around 5000.
 

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Well done on making the magazines. Great work.
 

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Here's a probable 'one of a kind' - it came out of the Savage Arms R & D collection. Based on it's features I would date it to about 1925. Take notice of the ejection port on this tube fed pump.....
SavageX01011.jpg

SavageX01013.jpg

SavageX01012.jpg

4680ca9f-fe85-4bf1-8ce9-613572787a06_zpse017c93d.jpg
... yes, it's bottom eject and one of the more unique actions I have ever seen.

A couple more Savage R & D pumps, these are based on the Savage Model 5 & 6, tube fed bolt action & semi-auto - these all use the same lifter and bolt face design and all have receivers made from tube steel. These were probably a look at adding a pump action to the Savage Model 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 series of 22's. Unfortunately the one was in a gunshop that burned down, but surprisingly the springs still are good and it does function.

Although these have a similar appearance to the Nobel pumps they are a completely different action with side eject and use many of the same parts as the Savage Model 5 & 6.Here's one shown with a Savage Model 6, it has a shorter action than the Model 6 but has basically all same parts from the lifter forward.
a950d452-03ab-4e90-ae10-b749f896a7ed_zpsi0cuqjlc.jpg


Here's the 'fire sale special' one, this has an action the same length as a Model 6.
Model 5 slide action prototype 01_zpsumuc6ikf.jpg

Model 5 slide action prototype 02_zpsjmhnsb1b.jpg
 

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A couple more that would be considered obscure in the USA but are well known in Australia. I had posted these pictures on another forum.

SPORTCO's (Sporting Arms Limited) from Australia. This first one will look familiar because it copies a well known Savage design.

A Sportomatic Model 2.


Being from the southern hemisphere where everything is backwards from up here in the north, they of course 'had' to use left-hand twist rifling for them to 'shoot straight' down under. ADDED- just to clarify this is intended to be a joke, my apologies for not making that clear.


The scope & mount are Parker-Hale and are the same vintage as the rifle, the rifle was factory drilled & tapped for that mount.



They also made tube fed versions and even copied a Steven's model name for it. Most of the Savage/Stevens patents for these would have expired by 1957.


This early model used Savage type magazines (that's what's in this one, it came without a magazine), it was later redesigned to take SPORTCO's own magazines of larger capacity 10, 15 & 20 round. They also made pump actions that used their magazines, the pump shown is a Model 90 from the mid 1960's, it also has left-hand twist rifling.

Looks a little odd with the 20 round in it.



I have heard complaints about the triggers on the Savage/Stevens of this design, SPORTCO may have solved that on theirs with the Model 62 'short movement trigger'.

Of course you also needed AUSSIE AMMO "Made especially for Australian conditions" or SPORTCO brand.
 

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Being from the southern hemisphere where everything is backwards from up here in the north, they of course 'had' to use left-hand twist rifling for them to 'shoot straight' down under.
Fascinating. I have seen water going down the drain in opposite directions, depending which side of the equator it's on. Will these guns shoot straight in the northern hemisphere even though they have a left-hand twist?
 
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Blackeagle, I have to apologize for not making it clear, that was intended to be a joke, I should have made that clearer, I really have no idea why they used left-hand rifling. I was totally surprised when I first put a cleaning rod down one of them and found that out, it just felt different and it took me awhile to figure out why.

Harry Pope made his target barrels with left-hand twist and I have heard several explanations for that but do not know if any are the true reason.
 

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...that name...Sportco....and the Superfast ammo boxes....all ring some distant familiar bell in my head.....hmmm....
Anyway, you have a very cool collection, Sav22.
Thank you for sharing it with us.
 
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