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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi there everyone, I just got an old revolver, 38cal break-away 6 shot. I can't find any manufacturers name on it but I'll put the markings on it.
**Top of the Barrel: "CAL-38", with some letters/other markings that I can't read yet - except what looks like "45", "S"-or "US", "/ - or X followed with a "P" Note: Read the note at the bottom.
**On the cylinder looking on the right side it says "S.P.T. 54"
**I took off the grips, on the top right side it has a "Crown" with an upper caseE which is turned 90deg. to its left with "37" under the "E"
** Stamped on the bottom of the right side [grips off] says "A-M-I"
**On the inside of the left grip it has "F&G" stamped on the grip.

Notes: On the top of the Barrel, the "45" is upside down to the "Cal-38" & the rest would be like looking from the rear of the barrel to the front: U or US, / or X then the "P"..
Oh yeah, I believe the following is the S/N: 1394

There is so much stamped on this pistol but nothing I can even find online...

Anyone who might have an idea of how I can clean this up enough so all the markings can be easier to read &/or take pictures of would help me out. Thanks, Dan:confused:
 

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Never mind the markings.. some times all it takes these sharp people here on TFF is just a picture! Give it a try! That and we love the "candy" that is posted!
 

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My guess is that you have a British Enfield revolver No. 2 MK I**. But without a picture this is only a guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll get the best picture of it & post it this week. Thanks for the info on maybe an Enfield. Since there is a "Crown" on the side I wondered if it was British made.
 

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See, sharp people here. A possible answer on just a description of markings. I love these guys (and gals)!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My guess is that you have a British Enfield revolver No. 2 MK I**. But without a picture this is only a guess.
Well owning an Enfield Rifle, I should have known that the crown on the side would or should have pointed me to Enfield. With the Hammer Spur gone it was either modified to fit the Tank Corps because the spur would catch protrusions but the front sight fits the No. 2 MK1* with the grips that were changed to a hard plastic along with the spurless hammer...

I just can't figure why there is no marking from Enfield with model number or date.

At any rate you made a good call. I'll post a picture soon. Thanks so much for your help..... Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I like the patina. Like no one ever took to much care of it but the inside of the barrel is perfect. I do need to replace the grips because one is damaged [other side].
 

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It certainly is an interesting looking gun. Thanks for finally getting the picture up. The suspense was killing me!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It certainly is an interesting looking gun. Thanks for finally getting the picture up. The suspense was killing me!
Yeah me too & it's mine-lol. But there is a couple things I did notice about it, the grips & spur missing from the hammer suggests to me it may have been modified by Enfield but I'll let the pro's tell me that.
 

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The No. 2 Mk 1 had the hammer spur. The Mk 1* and Mk 1** did not, and many Mk 1 revolvers were converted to Mk 1* by removing the spur. Reportedly the spur was eliminated because the gun was carried by tankers and the spur could catch on interior surfaces or equipment if a tanker had to get out in a hurry.

Since the British considered the revolver very much a secondary and close range weapon, the conversion to what we call "double action only" was not considered a problem.

Jim
 

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The grips and hammer spur appear to be standard to the Enfield No.2 Mark 1*, on the right side of the firearm ( with break open design ) there should appear the name Enfield over a crown. If these markings are not there I'm thinking the gun has been bead blasted and refinished. Even the War time finish guns still had the Enfield markings or the more rarer Albion markings
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
The grips and hammer spur appear to be standard to the Enfield No.2 Mark 1*, on the right side of the firearm ( with break open design ) there should appear the name Enfield over a crown. If these markings are not there I'm thinking the gun has been bead blasted and refinished. Even the War time finish guns still had the Enfield markings or the more rarer Albion markings
I got ya, I looked at it under a large magnifying glass that I use for notebooks when I'm checking for serial numbers & I find nothing. I know that on the right side just next to the grip it should have Enfield, Crown & sometimes manufacture date. In that area all I see is either P 1** or D 1** Note: the 1 could be the letter "I". Nothing else is stamped on the gun but the markings I stated in my first posting. Although I can see in a couple places what looks to be an upside down 7 followed by J with 1394. One spot on the bottom ahead of the trigger guard it reads "7 J" with "1394" under it.
I guess if I took a couple months & slowly polish this thing maybe I can find something but I hate to make it worth less by making a mistake during the cleaning process. I can say this, there is no "Enfield" stamped on the revolver period.
What would I look for if it is an Albion?

I should get my grandson to com over & make a combination of all the markings & put them into one photo so all the markings can be seen. I can't get any information from the original owner. This was passed down from his grandfather to his father to him & looking at the shape you can see that they didn't take completely good care of it with exception of the barrel which is perfectly clean & shines with no rust spots or signs of corrosion.

I'm still looking for replacement grips because one is broken.
Note: I found replacement grips. $28.00 shipped. One less thing to worry about. I'll post another picture once the are on & I get this old guy cleaned up a bit more.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
One thing I see is that some of the markings are hand stamped where like the Enfield, Crown are not stamped as deep. Correct me if I'm wrong.... This could be why the Enfield & Crown are not there depending on how much this gun was cleaned when it was sent back for servicing.
I took off the grips again. The Crown with a sideways E & 37 under the E, leads me to believe that this is an Enfield made in 1937? Stamped in an area where there was not a lot of room to stamp what should be on the right side next to the grip as you talked about.

Okay, I ordered grips but while I was browsing around online I came across a guy who was displaying the wooden grips he made which looked really good. What I didn't like about them was that I could see about 1/16" gap between the top of the grip & the gun. He didn't make the grips to overlap like the picture of my Enfield has but rather the older style grip. At any rate what I was getting at was he has the same markings as mine has on the right side. No "Enfield" over the "Crown" but a small stamping that has the "Crown", sideways "E" & a different number than the "37" like mine has.
Now, where the makers mark should be like I said before that mine has what looks to be either a "D" or"P" followed with a "1"or"I", this guys has a similar marking in the same place. I find this too strange that I was able to find another Enfield with the same type of markings? [no Enfield over Crown]. I guess I should be happy that all the serial numbers match. Thanks again, Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The No. 2 Mk 1 had the hammer spur. The Mk 1* and Mk 1** did not, and many Mk 1 revolvers were converted to Mk 1* by removing the spur. Reportedly the spur was eliminated because the gun was carried by tankers and the spur could catch on interior surfaces or equipment if a tanker had to get out in a hurry.

Since the British considered the revolver very much a secondary and close range weapon, the conversion to what we call "double action only" was not considered a problem.

Jim
Jim, I see you said that you had one. I also read that tankers complained about it because of what you mentioned. Did you get a good price for yours? I mean I don't know the condition but once I oil it & clean it as I cleaned my 1921 Iver Johnson Champion, I'm sure it will look a lot better than the way it looks in the picture. My grandson was over while I was checking my 770 Remington because it is a little tight at the bolt action & since I already own an Enfield Rifle, I got out the Enfield Revolver & told him that it was for him. But only sell it if he can get a good price. NEVER sell it if he's short of cash or on a impulse sell/sale.
P.M. me if you want, I don't really want to ask personal questions & expect them to be put on the site. Thanks, Dan
 
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