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See, Bandit, there's a couple of problems with your question.

First, Colt sold two different 25s, and they have different values.

The other thing is, like with many things, condition makes up a large part of the value. If you have a 65 Mustang that looks like it just came out of the showroom, and I have a 65 Mustang with 600,000 miles on it and it has severe rust-cancer, yours is gonna be worth more.

So - good, clear, in-focus pictures. Taken with a real camera, not a cell phone. Then maybe we can give you an estimate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gun Revolver Firearm Trigger Starting pistol


Starting pistol Airsoft gun


Gun Rifle Shotgun Air gun Wood


Gun Rifle Shotgun Firearm Air gun


I actually received four guns total from my uncle. Attached are pictures of each. The details are below:

Smith & Wesson 41 Magnum Pistol
Model 57, Serial #N309513
Excellent Condition

Colt 25 Auto Pistol
Model Vest Pocket, Serial #142234
Fair condition, small pitting in metal

Browning 22 Auto Rifle
Model SA22, cannot find serial # (help with this?)
Symbols on barrel
Standing Lion figure with "PV" underneath
Crown with "R" underneath
Bag(sack) with "E LG *" stacked underneath
Also on barrel in separate location is "L"
Excellent Condition

Berretta 12 Guage Double Barrel Shotgun
Model - Silver Hawk, Serial #C41757
Good Condition, Scratches on Stock

Any information you can give me on where to find the serial # on the Browning and the value of all four guns would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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Thanks for putting up pictures, Bandit5050! You have the older, more valuable Colt .25 automatic, the Model 1905. It was designed by the same John Browning who designed your .22 rifle.

Unfortunately, I can tell you nothing about the value of your Colt. It looks a bit blurred in your photo. Also, it has a blued-finish trigger and grip-safety. I know that many, if not all, Colt 1905's had a "case-hardened" finish on those parts. Both those things suggest your gun may have been re-finished at some time, which is bad for its collectors value.

A sharp picture or two, particularly of the stamped lettering on the slide would be needed to tell. Also somebody who knows vintage Colt automatics better than I do!

PS - now that I think of it, Colt may have called it the Model 1906. FN of Belgium made the same gun as the Browning 1905, I believe.
 

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The Colt may have been reblued, hard to say for sure from that picture. I would say value is in the $200 to $250 range, would need better pics to judge any further. The Smith 57 is a nice revolver, worth a lot more than the Colt. Your Browning 22 is a very nice little rifle. Before the 68 gun control act, 22's were not required to have serial numbers. I have one that was bought new around 1963 and it doesn't have a serial number either.
 

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From what I've seen at recent gun shows and auctions ( over last yr.) I'd would give you a wild a-- guess on the guns listed. The S&W mod. 57, $600-650; the Colt 1905 or 06 $275-300; the Browning .22 auto, $600-650; the Berretta 12 ga double $700-750. Nice looking firearms indeed!!
 

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Check the gun again in some very good light and make sure you just aren't missing the serial number. I have an old Remington Targetmaster and the serial number is almost impossible to see unless you know where to look and in the proper light. I was certain it didn't have a number until I read somewhere that it was just forward of the forestock and under the barrel--and there it was!
 

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Thanks, Bandit5050! Those are good photos, and just what is needed to give you a reasonable estimate of your particular gun. I don't venture to guess much on values, but I would say that your gun would bring about $250, net, if you took it to some gunshows and walked around with it. For sale to a dealer, or a quick sale, it would bring significantly less. It might bring more if you were willing to keep asking for more for a long time.

All these figures are very much IMHO, plus the big hurdle will be finding someone who wants a Colt 1906 in that condition.

Why so little, and what do I mean by "in that conditon"? The rough areas on your gun, like near the 1903 and 1910 patent dates on the slide, are called "pitting". They are what rust does to a gun if it has time enough. The fact that these areas are under the bluing instead of through it show that your gun has been reblued. Collectors generally do not want reblued guns, and the main value of your gun is to collectors. For a working gun, it is too old and heavy for its caliber; nowadays you can get 32 caliber automatics that are lighter than your gun, and have more modern trigger and safety systems.

If you walk around at gunshows, you will see Colt 1906s in worse shape with much higher prices. These are asking prices, not getting prices. There are people out there who think any lump of rust with "Colt" stamped on it is worth is worth at least $450, and once in a great while, they are right. Most such guns just sit for years, becoming old friends to everyone who goes to that show regularly.

Someone who has Colt reference material at hand can tell you what year it was made from the serial number. I don't, but those grips say 1920's to me.

PS - I don't know anything thing about your 22 rifle or shotgun, but the S&W revolver is valuable - twice, perhaps even three times as much so as the Colt. It looks minty, and big-frame S&W target-style guns are popular. It might be slow to sell because 41 Magnum is a cartridge with a small - but dedicated - following. That would be a very good gun to sell via the Internet, so you can tap into the national market.
 
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