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I bought an old Whitneyville Armory .22 at an estate sale last week. For those of you who have been to estate sales, you know that you have to grab up something as quickly as you can before someone else does! In grabbing this gun, I didn't realize it was missing some parts. Being more of a gun collector than a gunsmith, I just bought the pistol anyway. Now I'm looking for the missing parts!
As best I can tell, here's what I need:
1) The cylinder pin works, but is not original to the gun
2) The spur trigger is lacking a spring, and I'm not sure if it's coil or leaf.
3} The pin just forward of the trigger is missing, as are the parts which the pin holds in--which I think might be the cylinder stop and/or cylinder hand.
If anyone knows where I could get my hands on any of these parts, or even an exploded view of this guns parts, I would be forever grateful! Thanks so much!
 

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In regards to goofy's post--I agree with you 100% and there's no way I'm going to even ATTEMPT to take this gun apart--If I can find the parts I need, I have a qualified gunsmith I can call on to install these parts safely,,,,but thanks again for your post--it may save a hand or an arm or maybe even a life!
 

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You might want to throw up a few pictures so that the experts can see and get a better idea what might be needed.

Not to mention the fact that I don't know what a Whitneyville is and would like to see it. Also, we love some gun porn.
 

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I need to see pictures to see which one you have.
George you might have herd of one of the guns the Dragoon. It was a colt design built by Colt in the Whitney factory.
Mike
OK, I have heard of the Dragoon, many years ago I owned a replica of that monstrosity.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
You might want to throw up a few pictures so that the experts can see and get a better idea what might be needed.

Not to mention the fact that I don't know what a Whitneyville is and would like to see it. Also, we love some gun porn.
My gunsmith friend currently has the pistol, waiting for some parts or at least pictures of the parts so he can make them. Just as soon as I can see him to get it back, i will shoot some pictures of it and post them. In the meantime, if you google Whitneyville armory .22 revolver, some examples should come up. Mine has a brass frame with steel barrel, cylinder, and cylinder pin. Not sure, but I think it's the model 1 in .22 caliber. The larger the caliber, the higher the model number.
 

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The cylinder is in backwards and you appear to be missing the cylinder stop and the cylinder pin retainer. The trigger would have used a V shaped spring. Often the hand will be attached to the hammer and uses a leaf spring.

Is the mainspring still in the frame, and does the hammer have tension. You should be able to look into the notch of the frame where the hand would poke out and see if it is still in there.

Here are some images on Google that show you what the original configuration looked like. IT appears they used a set screw to hold the cylinder pin in place, similar to the Pre-War Colt Model 1873's. The original cylinder pin looks like it had a bushing built into it for the cylinder retainer screw.

The cylinder stop will be hard to create without an example...

19090396_4.jpg
19090396_6.jpg
whitneyville22-9.jpg
 

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The cylinder is in backwards and you appear to be missing the cylinder stop and the cylinder pin retainer. The trigger would have used a V shaped spring. Often the hand will be attached to the hammer and uses a leaf spring.

Is the mainspring still in the frame, and does the hammer have tension. You should be able to look into the notch of the frame where the hand would poke out and see if it is still in there.

Here are some images on Google that show you what the original configuration looked like. IT appears they used a set screw to hold the cylinder pin in place, similar to the Pre-War Colt Model 1873's. The original cylinder pin looks like it had a bushing built into it for the cylinder retainer screw.

The cylinder stop will be hard to create without an example...

View attachment 166524 View attachment 166526 View attachment 166528
Thanks VERY MUCH for the valuable information! I don't think I'm going to have to worry about fixing it though-a friend of mine looked at it and wants to buy it "as is" I apologize for causing you to go to all the trouble!
 

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Thanks VERY MUCH for the valuable information! I don't think I'm going to have to worry about fixing it though-a friend of mine looked at it and wants to buy it "as is" I apologize for causing you to go to all the trouble!
Hey do you still have the little Whitney revolver?
 

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The OP hasn't been around in 2 years.
 
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