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What about the new manufactured Colt Python? They're supposed to be stronger/smoother than the originals.
I typically respect Colt products but after hearing about all the problems some are having with the new Python - and watching a video (From Colt) about the problems I would NOT own one.

In short, the video described how the cylinder 'hand' is supported by the side plate and if the side plate becomes loose then problems may be experienced.

Their correction for this? and I quote, 'We are going to apply Loctite to the sideplate screws on all guns during assembly'.

Loctite on a $1500 + gun??
 

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The older I get the less attractive full bore anything is to me . I am still shooting the same ruger security six in 357 for the past 20 plus years .38 special is all good to me . If I was looking for the stoutest pistol I too would go either the dan Wesson or the red hawk
 

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I won't comment about other revolvers as I have no practical experience. I have a couple of 686's one is no dash with 6" barrel and the other is the more modern 686+ with a 3" barrel and is what I carry. I use nothing smaller than a 158 grain bullet at about 1100 fps or more depending on powder. In shooting my no dash 686 for more than 30 years full loads only I've never had an issue. In carrying the other a few years now and shooting a couple of hundred rounds ever week no issues.

I think that you will find that most firearms are proofed so it should withstand whatever you want to shoot as long as it not above maximum loads considered safe.
 

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I don't really know my 357s, but I was surprised Ruger doesn't make a 357 Super Redhawk, after all they make one in 10mm.
 

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A Dan Wesson .357 Maximum may be right up their with the strongest. It is beefed up beyond the .357 Mag.

I actually had a 7 1/2 Ruger .357 Max on lay away when they first came out and cancelled it when another handgun became available. I sort of wish I'd kept it and not turned it in, but really, the other calibers did what I wanted without all the flame cutting and lighter rounds jumping out of their jackets.
 

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I typically respect Colt products but after hearing about all the problems some are having with the new Python - and watching a video (From Colt) about the problems I would NOT own one.

In short, the video described how the cylinder 'hand' is supported by the side plate and if the side plate becomes loose then problems may be experienced.

Their correction for this? and I quote, 'We are going to apply Loctite to the sideplate screws on all guns during assembly'.

Loctite on a $1500 + gun??
I wasn't aware of that. I have to rethink my opinion of Colt I guess. What a slipshod way to solve an engineering problem.
 

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I have been a revolver owner all my life and all things considered it's hard to beat a S & W.

While one has to be a bit more 'selective' with a S & W with regard to use there are plenty of choices to 'fill the bill'.

By 'Selective' I am referring specifically to the 'magnum' calibers and what one plans to shoot. If one is going to shoot 'full house' ammo such as .357 Magnum regularly then a L or N frame Smith should be chosen. The K frame guns are great and highly popular however in the earlier pre lock models there is no doubt a verified issue with the forcing cones cracking on some however this was mostly due to to the 'Super Vel' ammo at time which in some loadings was overpressure and loaded with 110 grain bullets which were part of the problem as well. Regardless it is an accepted fact pre lock K frame .357 S & Ws should NOT be shot with 'full house' ammo regularly.

Hey, there are other quality revolvers that are excellent and many do not share the 'strength' issues that S & W has but then they do not follow the same frame designs and are designed differently.

Some insist Ruger builds the 'best' revolvers and largely in part they are excellent and very strong however in some of the larger versions they are not as 'streamlined' or balanced as well as a S & W.

With regard to Colt revolvers (specifically DA) while beautiful guns with great fit and finish there is no denying they are inferior mechanically to S & W and experience more problems and are much more difficult to work on. While most repairs and maintenance on a S & W can be done by a fairly competent 'amatuer' there are some things that should NOT be accomplished on a Colt except by a professional Colt gunsmith. Personally I would NOT own a Colt DA revolver.
 

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No doubt that would be the Manurhin MR 73, however finding one will be an issue, let alone finding an affordable one.
The factory guarantees the cylinder holds up to at least double the maximum .357 pressure and when they were in service with the French they were shot a lot without issue.
Some site state over 100K rounds without issue, but I have not verified it. (If even possible)

Why do you ask though and how much are you planning to shoot? I would just buy a S&W 686 and shoot it without worrying about it, I doubt you will shoot so much you wear it out. And even if you wear it out it's relatively cheap to replace. (Especially compared to the cost of the ammo you ran thru it)
Agreed.. Manhurin MR73 has to be among the toughest... I have also heard if the rigorous testing they have done on them. They ship match grade accurate too.
 

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I wasn't aware of that. I have to rethink my opinion of Colt I guess. What a slipshod way to solve an engineering problem.
While it's true that I'm a colt python fan...in fairness... The actual number of problem guns vs total Gus is 'acceptably' low. No one is perfect. Flaws exist in all products and get packaged and shipped. Some flaws like missing parts or 'DOA' are overcome by pre ship live fire testing...like Manhurin does.

I own old pythons and new ones. I don't doubt that with multiple thousands of full bore rounds they can go out of time. My most used python has been refinished but not re timed. It's 'slop' at 40ys old and enough rounds thru it that it needed a refinish is on par with new charters and ruger wheelguns. I have another 70's era ex Leo python in similar condition..and it's my go to fun gun... It's finish and grips are worn..so I loose no value shooting it. All my other vintage pythons lock up like the 3 new ones I have... And yes my 3 new ones have sights and the cup will spin.... Some of the main complaints I see..other than tool marks near screws that I also hear about now and then.

Up until last year if I could have only had 1 gun it would be a python...now... I'd have to have 2 guns..because I still have to have a python..but as good as the are...a Manhurin is better...
 

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A Manhurin 73 will probably set you back more than a vintage Python iirr.

I think they also have a model that the French Police used which shows up often used which is very similar to the Ruger Security Six. Didn't they also have 3" barrels?
 

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A Manhurin 73 will probably set you back more than a vintage Python iirr.

I think they also have a model that the French Police used which shows up often used which is very similar to the Ruger Security Six. Didn't they also have 3" barrels?
Agreed... A MR 73 will set you back about 2 vintage python or 3 new retail ones. :0
 

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I had a S&W Model 28 that I put over 30.000 rounds through. Half were magnums. Gave it to my son and it was as tight as new
 

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Well, your 7 shot 357's are based on the large frame pistols(.44mag) right?
 

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Gents, I'd like your thoughts on which of the various DA .357 Mag revolvers might be sturdiest, for holding up against steady diets of Magnum (and perhaps a bit more) level loads. This was a question posed during a recent gathering of fellow shooters, and I'd like a broader base of survey on the matter.
The "If y'need THAT much pow'r, git yerself a bigger GUN!" recommendation need NOT be revisited, here, as the discussion is MUCH more theoretical than practical. Any answer obtained from consensus will likely NOT see actual application.

The first choice that came to MY mind was a 6-shot Ruger Redhawk, but it fails the "available" test. I don't think very many were made nor sold, and I NEVER see them available in the used market.
I haven't measured the cylinder wall thickness on the 8-shot Redhawk, but I suspect they're quite strong, also. If cylinder wall thickness (CWT) on the GP-100, is greater, I might be inclined to vote for it.
N-frame S&W .357s in either trim are extremely tough. I've NEVER seen one loosen nor quit from the use of heavy loads before its owner (and their shooting hand) thought better of the idea.
I don't know much about the I-frame Colts (Python, ".357 Magnum", etc.), except that they were superbly made, on a frame that Colt originally used for larger bore cartridges, and are quite pleasant to shoot (SLOW FIRE). I've read, heard, and been told personally by people who should know, that steady diets of true magnum-level rounds will mess with the timing of these revolvers, before revolvers of other brands start to act up. Not having exhaustively shot a dozen revolvers from each manufacturer, I don't KNOW this to be the case, but I find it far from implausible.

Your thoughts, please?
If cost and time are not an issue, I suggest getting an S&W 500 mag and having the barrel and chambers sleeved for 357. Its durability would be unmatched.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Cost and time would likely be issues (I'm not sure how serious the originator of the question might be about this) with any such conversion, so the .500/.357 conversion fails the (relatively) "readily available" criterion. Almost certainly, weight would also be a consideration.
At 72 ounces, an unmodified .500 S&W revolver with the 8.375" barrel weighs in at close to half-again that of a similarly barreled N-Frame .357. Converting an X-frame to .357, if it can even be done, means smaller holes in everything, with even more weight, and a capacity of 5 shots, not 6 (not sure how important that might be, but it does change things).
I don't know about my shooting compadre who originally posed the question, but carrying around 1.5 N-frame revolvers for a reduction in capacity (for which no realistic ballistic gain can compensate) doesn't seem like a good trade. Since he is 4 years older and smaller of frame than me, it's difficult to envision him liking this idea.

I'd have to admit, though, such a revolver would probably be the softest-shooting .357 "handgun" on the planet!
 
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