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Cost and time would likely be issues (I'm not sure how serious the originator of the question might be about this) with any such conversion, so the .500/.357 conversion fails the (relatively) "readily available" criterion.
I suspect the suggestion of converting a .500 to .357 was mostly 'tongue in cheek'.

It would be incredibly time consuming, costly, and on the 'far end' of ANY gun conversion as it is.
 

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Rugers are generally considered to be tougher. They are bulkier because the frames are cast. Weight wise though they are pretty comparable to others. If I was getting a wheel gun just to fire crazy hot loads at the range it would be a redhawk in 357 or a super redhawk for anything bigger. My son has a 454 super redhawk and I doubt you could wear it out. Mainly cause after a few cylinders of hot rounds most people are done with it for a while or ask for some 45lc to shoot lol

Personally though I prefer smith and wesson. I just bought a new .357 5" 686+ Pro a few months back. They are plenty strong and look and feel better to me. It's fun to shoot hot rounds and I'm sure most people do. But let's be honest probably 90% of 357s out there see way more .38spl then they do hot .357 mag. Most people aren't shooting thousands of rounds of hot 357 mag at the range every year. Even if you reload it's just much cheaper to plink with .38spl.
Perfectly said!
 

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Let's face it, any machine will eventually were out with enough use. And like all guns each will have it's 1 or 2 most accurate loads. Personally, I've never known anyone who shot only the hottest loads possible exclusively... but would opt for a Ruger, older Dan Wesson and then older Colt Python. I once owned a Python that had the same aim point regardless of ammo being shot. From 148gr wadcutter to the hottest 158gr jacketed at ranges up to 40 yards with the same impact points. Never experienced that with anything else.
 

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IMO

DA = S&W, Taurus, Ruger, and CZ (Dan Wesson mdl) all have new durable DA 357s on the market today. The python has also been reintroduced. New DW mdl still has option of mutible barrels w/ one frame.

SA = Ruger
 

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I prefere Smith DA revolvers because the are strong, reliable and smooth shooters …but if strength was the number one consideration :unsure: Ruger wins hands down. There may be stronger revolvers but Rugers are reasonably priced, readily available and back up what they sale with customer service that is hard to beat. The Redhawk in 357 is definitely a tank, the GP 100 is certainly not fragile by any stretch of the imagination either.
 

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If 357 ammo was available I would be in the market for a Ruger GP-100 or a S&W 686. 357 has been the hardest ammo to find around here. I can find some 38 Special every once and a while. I have SA 357s that I really like. All Rugers. Never had a problem with any of them. I do have a Ruger SP-101 with a 2-inch barrel. It seems to handle the hot 357 loads well but is too small to be much of a target gun.

I have been on the lookout for a DA 357 for about 5 years now. Very hard to find with this shortage going on. Seems you can buy a new one for not much more than they want for used ones now. I would get a Ruger GP or an S&W 686. If I were looking for a gun to shoot hot loads all the time I would go with the Ruger.
 

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Readily available at this point in time, is the hard part. With that criteria in mind, I would say GP-100 or Colt Python. The general consensus I have read about from competitive shooters is that S&W 's wear out faster than Colts. Specifically 586, or 686 vs. Python. I have one of the New Pythons. It weighs about 3 lbs. I think it will outlive my grandchildren.
 

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<slapping forehead> Dan Wesson. COMPLETELY forgot about them! I shot a couple of them in long range slow fire situations & liked them. Had HUGE trouble with them, when trying to shoot them under time pressure. Cylinder latch was in the wrong place and HELL to work quickly. Ejector rod looked like it was custom engineered to poke a hole through one's palm when ejecting empty shells. FELT like it, too.
For hunting or silhouette, these things don't matter much, but I'd sure want something else for defensive situations.
Kosh, the cylinder latch was placed there for two reasons, one for strength, the other for reloading with one hand,...if you're right handed. Lay it in the LH palm, thumb operates latch, middle two fingers swing the cylinder out, thumb hits the ejector, RH is waiting with a speed loader. The guy that taught me that could do it just as fast as a reload in a 1911.
 

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Cost was definitely not part of the original criteria. Don't know how cost got thrown in. Maybe later and I missed it?
Cost is always part of the criteria. If you can get something that is almost as good at what it dose for a dollar as something that is just a hair better for 10 dollars that extra 9 dollars may or may not be worth spending. ;)
 
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