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I am looking for help learning more about this pair of pistols. First, I know very little about flintlocks. My brother-in-law acquired these about 10 years ago and recently gave them to me as a gift. They have many of the same markings and there looks to be writing or Roman numerals across the headband of the crown on the side of each weapon, and the text looks to be similar on both. One of the handles was repaired with a dowel, and the other is loaded. I would appreciate any help in learning more. Thanks in advance!
 

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Can you give us a bit of history , such as were your brother in law got them?
The reason I am asking is that the locks don't quite look right. Or maybe I've just had too much coffee.:)
 

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Thank you for the added info.
Finding these pistols at a garage sale combined with how crudely they are made makes me think that these pistols are modern reproductions made for the tourest trade most likely from the middle east. Hopefully I am wrong. Sorry.
 

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I'm not too sure you are all that far off grc, they have the crown on the lock plate but don't follow the typical martial patterns of British military arms and no initials under the crown, should be a GR for George Rex. The proof marks on the barrels don't look right either.

George, you mentioned that one of the pistols is loaded, be careful with it. If you try the lock for function there is a chance that a spark from the flint could ignite the charge.
 

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The crown was the first thing that caught my eye. No initials or dates.
I have never seen such a stamp being unevenly put on any lock. ( one side stamped harder than the other side making the stamp uneven)
The other thing that caught my eye is the uneven and crude engraved border lines of the lock. One should remember that when flintlock pistols were being made , they cost a lot of money. And considering the expence, you would expect better workmanship.
 

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Thank you grc and grizz, the feedback is appreciated. Why do you suppose somebody would go through the trouble to repair the handle if they are reproductions? Also the strike plate shows a good many impact markings. And thank you, I will be sure to treat it as a loaded weapon.
 

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Thank you grc and grizz, the feedback is appreciated. Why do you suppose somebody would go through the trouble to repair the handle if they are reproductions? Also the strike plate shows a good many impact markings. And thank you, I will be sure to treat it as a loaded weapon.
If they are modern made it may have been done to make them look like antique or perhaps it broke during the build and they didn't want to start over. they also might be fairly old, tourist trade guns have been being made for as long as there have been tourists to buy them. It is also possible they were made back in the day to look like English made to get a higher price just as nowadays they make fake designer Gucci handbags and such.

You can safely unload a loaded muzzle loader, but if you've never had the experience or the tools, you might want to let an experienced person do it for you. If you have a black powder or muzzle loading club local to you you might contact them or they might be able to recomend you to a gunsmith locally.
 

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They look pretty crude to me as well. Why someone would repair it? Because it was broken I suppose...and no sir, I'm not trying to be a smart aleck. Broken it isn't of much account. Even during the hey day of muzzleloaders many originals show repairs of all kinds and it continues to this day. How well the repairs are done is entirely incumbent upon the skill of the person who did the repair. Some are totally invisible....others not so much.
 
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