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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a child, my father was given a cap lock musket and had never known anything about it. After his passing, I am now the proud owner and would like to know a little about the piece.

There are two areas on the lock side plate with markings. At the rear is Phil 1835 which I presume is Philadelphia 1835?

Below the lock and cap is a US with other letters in an arc below US. Not many of the letters are pronounced enough to make any sense to me. There is what appears to be a W, space or maybe I, C, K, H and maybe more. The W is just left of the top of the arc, apex.

It has a wood ram rod, no brass on the end. Round barrel.

My apologies to the purist firearm enthusiasts for not naming parts correctly.

Any help in identifying or guiding me to a site that I can learn more about the piece would be greatly appreciated
Computer Laptop Personal computer Wood Table
Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun Gun barrel
Wood Automotive tire Gas Auto part Engineering
Violin family Wood Shotgun Door Wood stain
Wood Shotgun Air gun Trigger Metal
Working animal Jaw Wood Sculpture Artifact
.

Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This, as many of you already know, may be an M.T. Wickham conversion but I'll not make that presumption due to my lack of knowledge about the musket. I failed to add that in the original post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Hawg. It is pretty rough but still very cool. When you say cut down are you referring to the barrel length? Based on that, the rod must have been cut down as well since it is comparable in length to the barrel. There isnt a front sling mount either and only one band. The trigger guard sling mount looks to have been removed (ground away) rather than rusted away.

The conversion from flint to cap looks like it was done in the field, (lacking workmanship). It has E W 1847 scribbed into the stock. Maybe those are initials of the owner. There also appear to be hash marks near the initials, maybe kills? Mexican American War maybe???

To me a very cool piece of history. I'd like to know more about it, unfortunately it doesnt talk, so I will continue to watch this forum. Thanks for the input.
 

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Wickham is actually the original manufacturer. He received a number of contracts for M1816 series muskets, yours being from one of his last for M1822/28 Muskets. I would have to pull a book to get the contract specifics and delivery dates, but I would be happy to share that with you if you are interested.

The alteration to percussion was performed by Henry Leman of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Leman was a very prolific contractor for percussion altering arms for both the US Government and the State of Pennsylvania from 1861 to 1863. The musket was later sporterized into a shotgun for hunting purposes.
 
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