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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
and other than it being a Kukri Knife, it has no stampings or markings?

The lady I got it from only told me what she new and that being, she said
her grandpa gave it to her and he told her he'd brought it back from "the"
war.
I asked her what war, and that she couldnt tell me for certain. (she thought he'd brought it back from WWII. So, with no markings/stamping of any sort,
I was wondering if anyone could help me out on this one.
I have NO clue...real/fake or actually used in combat?

I appreciate any help/input/info!!!

(it's not letting me post pics...I'll re-boot and post the pics):eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Beth.
I'm just not sure if it's a "tourist" type of knife you'd buy at a gift shop somewhere
or the real thing.
I do know that the feel of it is well made/balanced good, so it does have me wondering?
I'd sure like to know if it actually does have a good history behind it.
 

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Not REALLY OLD(pre-1900)but has all the hallmarks of a real kukri. Handles on the main knife,the small knife,and the flint striker do look like water buffalo,the castings are open mold native style,the wooden scabbard body looks to be covered in the traditional dyed goatskin shrunk to fit and the tangs are fitted by peening over to lock the blades in place after pushing the heated tangs into the handles to produce a tight fit.Would bet was made somewhen about 1940-1960,and if the blades are not chromed,was a real working tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not REALLY OLD(pre-1900)but has all the hallmarks of a real kukri. Handles on the main knife,the small knife,and the flint striker do look like water buffalo,the castings are open mold native style,the wooden scabbard body looks to be covered in the traditional dyed goatskin shrunk to fit and the tangs are fitted by peening over to lock the blades in place after pushing the heated tangs into the handles to produce a tight fit.Would bet was made somewhen about 1940-1960,and if the blades are not chromed,was a real working tool.
Thanks much, dustydog!
I'll have to have a closer look as to weather or not the blade is chromed.
To be honest, after taking the pics and looking hard for some type of stamp or maker marks, I've laid it up.
Will defiantly have a closer look...
Appreciate the information!!!
 

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My uncle brought one back from India after WWII. The two small blades were never sharpened. I have no idea what happened to it, but it is identical to yours.
 

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It looks good to me, and the blade isn't chromed. As DustyDog sez, it's a functional kukri with no particular collector interest- but an honest example of the type and not a tourist souvenier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My uncle brought one back from India after WWII. The two small blades were never sharpened. I have no idea what happened to it, but it is identical to yours.
Thats the same on these two small small blades, never sharpened.
It looks good to me, and the blade isn't chromed. As DustyDog sez, it's a functional kukri with no particular collector interest- but an honest example of the type and not a tourist souvenier.
That was my biggest concern at the time. Just knowing it isnt is worth
"that" to me!

I appreciate all the info you all gave!!!:thumbsup:
 
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