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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My father and I just purchased a drilling, it's a 16ga X 16ga X 8mm "probably 8X57mm rimmed". I know for sure that the shotgun barrels are both smooth bore with 2 1/2 inch chambers. I'm not really sure what model it is or when it was made. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated. I will take more photos if need be.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Must have been some markings on the barrels and barrel flats. Can you post those as well?
I can but not until later today or tomorrow as the gun is stored at my father's house. Is there anything you can tell from the marking on the receiver or the serial number?
 

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The bottom of the rifle barrel and the shotgun flats are where the most meaningful proofs will be. It's likely there is some other stamps as well and usually they're mechanics marks or possibly the barrel set maker. Should be able to tell the year and town in which it was proofed. There should be some name and city/town on the rib as well. Bear in mind that often is not the maker, just the retailer. Just as Marlin and Mossberg made rifles for Sears, Western Auto and others. Sear house brands were J.C. Higgins and Ted Williams. Western Auto was Revelation....but....neither Sears nor Western Auto ever made a firearm in their existence. The German firearms industry up to the end of WWII was a spaghetti bowl of cottage shops, intermarried gun making families, contractors and sub-contractors.

With the dolls head extension and horn grip it's almost assuredly pre-WWII and could be as early as pre-WWI. Proofs will tell the story. With the cocked chamber indicators, cartridge trap and side panels with tear drops that should be a pretty nice drilling. Drillings and double rifles are my two favorites. I'd hate to be forced to choose between one or the other.

Edit: And Firpo is exactly right.
 

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I always admire the workmanship on German items. Someone, or many someones, spend months building these great works of art for a particular purpose. Stunning work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not sure if this helps but the gunsmith took a cast of the rifle barrel and so far it's a 9.3mm, not sure if it's a 9.3x57 or a 9.3x74R but I was definitely wrong about it being 8mm
 

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Did he give you the chamber casting? I just received some 9.3X72R that I’m going to convert to an 8X72R Brenneke. If that you could order dies and be good to go. Brass is readily available...at the moment. Others here will be much more help than myself but getting that casting is going to be the key to solving this puzzle.
 

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I doubt very seriously it's a 9.3 X 74R. That was very uncommon in pre-war drillings. 9.3 X 57R is possible and would be a little rare. It never really caught on in Germany, not like the 9 X 57R. 9.3 X 72R was very popular and is most likely. Thieme & Schlegelmilch chambered their proprietary 9.3 x 75R Nimrod and that's a possibility but, I think pretty unlikely as the cartridge was fairly short lived and I never knew of anyone else to chamber it. Again, pictures of the proofs on the bottom of the rifle barrel and on the shotgun barrel flats will tell the story. Evidently the 'smith didn't cast the chamber? That, or if he would just look at the proof marks and look them up would tell him what it is.
 
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