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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone please tell me the easiest way to price reloaded shotgun shells? All the formula's I find seem too complicated. I saw a post on here before but cannot locate it now. Thanks ahead of time.
 

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400 1oz. loads in a sack of shot. 355 1 1/8 oz loads. Take the cost of shot and divide it by one of the above ($50/400). Take a tray of primers and divide by 100. Take a bag of wads and divide by the bag contents (250 or 500). Take your cost of a lb. of powder and divide by 7,000 then multiply by the charge in grains. Add it up. That's your cost.
 

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I have an ap on my Iphone that does it all for you. You put in your recipe, cost of items and it breaks down the cost of each round, how much the cost of each component is and how much of each component you need for larger quantities. It is pretty slick, and it even shows the cost going down for every consecutive loading of the brass or plastic in the case of shotgun shells. I love it.
It is called hand-load by Tom Holsten. I have used it for about 2.5 years. I dont know if it is available for other platforms or not but it wouldn't hurt to check. I did pay for this one I think but it has been worth all .99 pennies. (it may be more now)
 

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As has been posted if instead of the 'price' you mean what is your 'cost' to reload a round, regardless of caliber or gauge?

Simply calculate your cost for each component as purchased and add them up. If primers cost you $35 per thousand then $35 divided by 1000 = $0.035 per primer. Same goes for each other component of the ammo in question, your cost divided by how many that cost bought, including any hazmat and shipping fees if bought on line

If however you are referring to what price to charge for your reloads, note that you need a Federal manufacturers license to sell ammo you have made. And then you would do the same calculation based on your purchase price for components.

I NEVER calculate a 'cost' for the free-time I spend reloading for obvious reasons. I don't calculate ANY of my hobbies based on the cost of the time I spend pursuing them in my off hours.
 

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From MarineOne's past questions about manufacturing/remanufacturing ammo, I think he is indeed thinking about what to price reloaded ammo for as opposed to just calculating cost to reload them. More clarification from him would help.

Otherwise, the above mentioned methods to calculate cost of components as about right.
I don't reload shotshells so I'm not familiar at all with the current costs for components.
 

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Go to Trapshooters.com They have a simple easy to use cost calculator. Even includes cost for hulls if you have to buy them and Factory loads in your area so you can see how much you save per box. Also cost of loader and how many boxes it will take to pay for it qwith the savings over factory loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
From MarineOne's past questions about manufacturing/remanufacturing ammo, I think he is indeed thinking about what to price reloaded ammo for as opposed to just calculating cost to reload them. More clarification from him would help.

Otherwise, the above mentioned methods to calculate cost of components as about right.
I don't reload shotshells so I'm not familiar at all with the current costs for components.
Sorry guys, I should have been more specific on my question. I am indeed reloading, and need to find the best way to calculate cost of what I am putting into each shot. I found an online calculator for handguns and rifles, but nothing for shotshells.
 

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Sorry guys, I should have been more specific on my question. I am indeed reloading, and need to find the best way to calculate cost of what I am putting into each shot. I found an online calculator for handguns and rifles, but nothing for shotshells.
the just figure your # of loaded shells , unit cost, looking at the total of materials put into them.

bags of shot, pounds of powder, wads, hulls and primers.
 

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Yep - total expenditure to make 100 rounds divided by 100 = unit cost.

IF you are in fact an FFL manufacturer and not a hobbyist like most all of us you WOULD factor in labor and overhead costs and should question why the accountant and lawyer who helped you set up the business didn't work out this portion of your business plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yep - total expenditure to make 100 rounds divided by 100 = unit cost.

IF you are in fact an FFL manufacturer and not a hobbyist like most all of us you WOULD factor in labor and overhead costs and should question why the accountant and lawyer who helped you set up the business didn't work out this portion of your business plan.
Randy, I recently received my FFL, and am slowly building up the business. I am figuring in my mark-up, labor and over head. The rifle and handgun part is running good, but I need to get the shotshells going.
 

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I hope I have not come off poorly in my responses -

Over the decades I have seen too many mom-n-pops go down the drain because the owners were true hobbyists selling whatever product line (scuba gear, motorcycles, model trains, whatever) who had very limited business acumen and almost no business plan in place.

If you have a working pricing model for centerfire ammo, it should work regardless of what caliber or gauge is being discussed. Components iz components, parts iz parts. I have read the stories of a number of folks who were successful speaking in terms of the actual 'product' involved being secondary to the success of the enterprise.

All the best on your business venture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I hope I have not come off poorly in my responses -

Over the decades I have seen too many mom-n-pops go down the drain because the owners were true hobbyists selling whatever product line (scuba gear, motorcycles, model trains, whatever) who had very limited business acumen and almost no business plan in place.

If you have a working pricing model for centerfire ammo, it should work regardless of what caliber or gauge is being discussed. Components iz components, parts iz parts. I have read the stories of a number of folks who were successful speaking in terms of the actual 'product' involved being secondary to the success of the enterprise.

All the best on your business venture.
No problem Randy. I researched for close to a year before making the decision to make a business out of it. I also have a business degree under my belt, so that will give me a little leverage on running it. I found this site while doing my research, and it has helped me.
 
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