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My first post, folks, so sorry if this has been asked before.

Fortunately, I stocked up on primers prior to the current shortages, but am somewhat concerned about the best method of preserving them. I have access to a plastic bag sealer that withdraws the air as it seals.

Is it best to: leave the primers as they are, sealed in the bag or sealed in the bag with a silica pack?

Will the silica remove needed moisture from the compounds?

Thanks for your help.
 

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I have primers that are years old and they are fine. However, if you vacuum seal them that is a good way to protect them.
 

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Vac sealer is good , common sense is even better; keeping them some where high and dry is the most effective remedy.
 

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Just keep them dry.
 

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don't shoot them. they last a long time that way!

but seriously, just throw 'em in a ziplock or in an ammo can and call it good. or on your shelf in the open. they are sealed and will work fine for a loooooooong time! just keep them dry and stored in a safe place where they won't get smacked around.
 

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I don't load a lot of center fire rifle cartridges and have been working with this supply which is several decades old. I have used some of the them this last year and all performed as intended. They have been kept in the original packages and just stored on the shelf in a cabinet in the house. They have been stored in Ohio and made the trip to Louisiana where they stayed for several years and then made the trip back to Ohio and they are in the basement today. I have no doubt they will work fine tomorrow.
 

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I keep my primers in those plastic (rubber seal on lid) boat storage containers. You can get around ten 1000 ct primer cases in one of those boat storage containers. Now I've wondered about long term storage myself. Reason is I put 5-6 of those alum dessicant blocks in each storage container with the primers. I keep them in a cool, dry location, never under 50 degrees, never over 65 degrees, humidity from 37% to 50%. About every 8 months, I notice the dessicant starts turning from blue to pink; I then place the alum dessicant blocks in the oven at 350 for a few hours; they bake back to blue and then I replace them back in the primer boat storage boxes. I've always thought we live in an extremely dry climate, but wonder why the dessicant blocks turn from blue to pink every 8 months? Where is the humidity coming from inside the primer storage containers? I figure those dessicant blocks must be working just the same.

I've also wondered how one would could prepare primers & powder for long term storage too, say in a location that would not be accessed regularly. You know the buggers do have laws on the books concerning hoarding of ammo supplies that they wouldn't hesitate to use if they thought they could get away with it. Crazy and sad where our Nation seems to be heading.
 

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I keep my primers in those plastic (rubber seal on lid) boat storage containers. You can get around ten 1000 ct primer cases in one of those boat storage containers. Now I've wondered about long term storage myself. Reason is I put 5-6 of those alum dessicant blocks in each storage container with the primers. I keep them in a cool, dry location, never under 50 degrees, never over 65 degrees, humidity from 37% to 50%. About every 8 months, I notice the dessicant starts turning from blue to pink; I then place the alum dessicant blocks in the oven at 350 for a few hours; they bake back to blue and then I replace them back in the primer boat storage boxes. I've always thought we live in an extremely dry climate, but wonder why the dessicant blocks turn from blue to pink every 8 months? Where is the humidity coming from inside the primer storage containers? I figure those dessicant blocks must be working just the same.

I've also wondered how one would could prepare primers & powder for long term storage too, say in a location that would not be accessed regularly. You know the buggers do have laws on the books concerning hoarding of ammo supplies that they wouldn't hesitate to use if they thought they could get away with it. Crazy and sad where our Nation seems to be heading.
Could it be that you have condensation inside the plastic container? That would be one possible reason. Even just a 5 degree temp change can cause condensation inside plastic.
 

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I have thousands of small pistol and small rifle primers that are close to 20 years old. I just put the 1000bxs in freezer type zip locks and sealed them. They are like new. Moisture is not a problem if you don't trap it in the bags in the first place. Condensation can't happen if there is no moisture. Temp swings won't matter. Obviously heat might destroy the chemical compounds but anything under 80F should be fine.
 

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Lone wolf, I've never noticed humidity and we have a wood stove in basement that runs 10 months/year. Here in Alaska, we have permafrost that keeps foundation between 50-60 degrees even when it's 90 degrees outside in July. Would military ammo boxes work better than plastic, or maybe a sealed plywood box? I wonder what type container would be optimum?
 

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dont know if this is the best way but i keep mine in original boxes and put them in old military .30 cal ammo metal cont which is stored in metal gun cabinet (prior to safe and politacal correctness) with one of the "DAMP-RID" large desicant containers from the home depot, need to change them about every 6mo as is kinda humid around this area half the year,, seems to work as some are over 20yrs old and work fine.
 

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I buy primers by the case (5000) and vacuum seal them as soon as I get home if I don't need them right away. I am in the process of finding back big enough to vacuum seal my 8# powder tubs. These are the 2 most important things to keep dry so I do everything I can to keep moisture out.

Doc
 

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Guys, be careful with primers. Remember they are explosive and should be stored properly, and that means kept in the original containers, never stored in bulk (a glass jar:eek:) and NEVER in a closed metal container. That just makes a pretty perfect bomb in the event of a fire.

Here's a link to the SAAMI literature on proper storage of powder and primers:

http://www.saami.org/specifications_and_information/publications/download/SAAMI_ITEM_201-Primers.pdf

http://www.saami.org/specifications.../download/SAAMI_ITEM_200-Smokeless_Powder.pdf
 

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I called a company that sells dessicant and the lady told me I could buy a 5 gal bucket of those blue to pink ones for $250, better deal than those blocks from midway or wherever. Needless to say I haven't spent the 250 yet, ha ha. The lady said told me they will take the humidity down to 20% until they turn pink and need rebaked for a few hours at 350.

I might vacumn seal some and some ammo too for storage.
 
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