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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yesterday I was very happy with the results of my session. I had decided to pause the actual loading until my son brings me out the scale he bought for me (Hornady magnetic scale), but I had other things to do anyway.

Long and short I successfully adjusted my decapping die and deprimed a bunch of brass, then I decided, after reading a bit on here, to try to reseat some partially seated primers. I had read that most here advise to just decap them, but I figured I would give a careful reseating a try, and it worked beautifully.

Yes I know I am still a noob but I am learning more and more each time I sit down at my reload bench. Now if only next week would get here so my son can bring that scale lol.

Edit: oh I forgot, depriming all that brass gave me the chance to try out the Lee primer pocket cleaner, and it works great
 

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I know what you mean when you say you tried something you were I little nervous to do. It's a good feeling when you successfully accomplish a task. With each successful accomplishment comes self pride. But keep in mind bad times come too, when it just don't work out and you think I should have listened to them. But that's what makes you a better reloader. When the guys tell you something, they are saying it for a reason. They tried the other way and it didn't work, or whatever the case is they will not tell you something that will hurt you. Wait till you get to the range and your gunna shoot the first reloads you made. Tons of second thoughts will come into your head, things like did I seat the bullet too deep, did I put too much powder in it, believe me it will happen. But if things go good and nothing happens but a bullseye, the feeling of self satisfaction is like no other. You feel more secure reloading and stop asking yourself so many questions, but they still come. I'm still asking questions and everything I get I write it down, that's just me tho. But keep up the good work and remember your never gunna stop learning with reloading. There's so many combinations of components to be matched together. It's never ending.
 

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^^^^^
and it's so much fun trying new combinations.

I remember the first time I rebuilt a transmission. 1976 Ford FMX in a Ranchero 302. I didn't know it until later but I started off with about the most difficult one at the time. no books, just careful disassembly while noting how things work. but when I get to reloading I read, read, read, ask questions, and read some more. you're "playing" with stuff that can kill you. go slow
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To answer a couple questions, I'm currently reloading for 40 S/W, and no they weren't in a loaded round lol. I do have one or two of those, and I am waiting for my bullet puller to arrive before I do those. These were just empty cases with a primer stuck halfway in.

There is one primer that went in upside down. Not sure what to do about that one. Toss it? Or punch it out with the decapper?
..(very carefully, of course)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah I get chills thinking about shooting these rounds, but some meticulous weighing should fix that a little at least. I have the Lee powder dispenser but I don't trust it (or myself) until I learn by verification that I can rely on it. And even then I will still verify. That's why I only did 10 rounds. When my scale comes I will weigh a primed case together with a bullet, then weigh the rounds I made and subtract the difference. That should give me my powder charge in each case.
 

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When my scale comes I will weigh a primed case together with a bullet, then weigh the rounds I made and subtract the difference. That should give me my powder charge in each case.
I think I would rather measure the powder itself even if it means pulling a bullet. case to case can have weight difference and with the small amounts involved in handgun loads 2 grains can make it dangerous. I may be wrong, but I still like to be safe.
 

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I personally like to KNOW, without doubt or hesitation, that my loads will fire safely, first and foremost. Reliably, and accurately. The only way that I know of to do this is to be meticulous with each step of the process. I, and probably most of us here, have had to pull bullets to make sure we hadn't done something incorrectly. Be safe, your hands, face, and family may appreciate the time and effort greatly.
 

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I think I would rather measure the powder itself even if it means pulling a bullet. case to case can have weight difference and with the small amounts involved in handgun loads 2 grains can make it dangerous. I may be wrong, but I still like to be safe.
Ditto. If you want to double-check a powder charge, dump it from the case before seating the bullet and weigh it by itself. If it's to your specs, just funnel it back into the case and then proceed to the bullet seating step
As 68 said, there can be fairly large weight differences in cases (especially if you've got mixed brands) and that variation will get combined with any variation in your powder charge.

I don't remember seeing in your other posts if you're using a single stage press or a progressive/turret.

I'm not a progressive guy, my setup is either a single-station or a manual 3-station press.
My preferred powder charging procedure is to fill a loading block/tray and fill it with resized/primed/expanded cases. Next, I'll throw a powder charge into each case. After that, I eyeball each case in the tray to make sure all the powder charges look about the same height. That way you can see if you missed charging a case or dumped two charges in a case. If all looks good, the you can proceed to the bullet seating step.

I always work from right to left and back to front on my trays...but however you choose to fill your cases, establish a routine and stick with it. This will give you the least chance of missing or double-charging a case.
And if you get interrupted while charging cases, double or triple check where you left off when you resume. That is one of the biggest things that I worry about when I'm loading. I've had to punch a few squib loads out of the barrel...and KNOCK ON WOOD! I've never touched off a double-charged load.
 

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As stated above, weighing a completed round then subtracting case weight, bullet weight and primer weight, Does NOT work. To many variables in the components.
Especially if you're loading once-fired cases from bulk buys at shows or online. I chuckle when I see how much different the weight is between manufacturers cases, and even with the same manufacturer.

I use a reloading tray and take the powder charge from every fifth round and put it on the scale to verify the weight. Same with checking OAL to insure the bullets are seating properly. It's easy to remember the fifth because it's the end of each row on the tray.

Get into a routine and don't allow distractions while reloading. I don't allow anyone in my reloading room while I'm reloading, and my background music is only instrumental CD's. Safety first like your life depended on it...because it does!
 

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I use a single stage, antique, Herters cast iron c-press. I will decap several hundred rounds then clean and polish, mostly .38/.357. I then prime however many rounds I plan to load. I use a Herters, antique, powder measure with a sliding bar. I check the powder load on, you guessed it, a Herters, antique, balance beam powder scale. (All of the Herters equipment I inhereited from my father and grandfather which they purchased new from Herters in the '50s). I throw a powder charge and go directly to the press and seat a bullet and put the finished cartridge in a bin. The powder measure is on my left, cases and bullets in front center and press on my right. This enables me to throw a powder charge, visually check it as I pick up a bullet on the way to the press. If I question the charge I check it on the scale and replace the charge.

Every once in a while my mind wanders, it normally finds its way back, and I miss throwing a charge and seat a bullet. when this happens, I keep a balance scale to check my loads. I take a cartridge that I know is properly loaded and place it on one side of the scale. I then take the questionable cartridges and place them on the other. If I have forgotten the powder the second cartridge will be lighter and the results are immediately visible. Then I take the appropriate corrective action.
 
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