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Discussion Starter #1
Back in the 70s I know of two 870 Remington’s with the safety on, fired when dropped. Both took a hard jolt to the butt of the shotgun. It wasn’t me, but I was there and no one was hurt.

I also had a friend who had a Mossberg fire when dropped. I don’t remember the model, but he claimed the safety was on. I wasn’t there and I don’t know how it landed. But no one was hurt.

Another person I know dropped a 410 and it landed on its butt and this time the person was hurt. He did recover and is ok.

I was wondering if a pump rifle could do the same thing. The subject came up while looking at my friends rifles. He has an older 22 pump and a 270 pump. He’s not worried about it. But he was there when the 870s did it and I guess it just stuck in our heads all these years.
 

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I only have 3 pump .22s and it's not something that i have tried to see if they would fire with safety on. One of my pumps 1890 doesn't even have a safety just a half cock. So i can;t help you with your question, but i hope they won't fire if they are dropped!
 

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I
've got 3 pump shotguns, 2 Mossberg and 1 Rem and 1 pump rifle, a Rem 22. Never had that issue with any, but never had any interest in dropping them on the buttstock.
 

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I 'd never heard or realized that an 870 could do that. That's food for thought as we look back over the safety classes many of us may have taught to young hunters. The need to unload when crossing fences or maybe now even when we negotiate slippery or dangerous sections of terrain seem even more important in the light of this possibility.

When's the last time we thought of how some older or very worn 1911's could fire when disengaging the safety? That is supposed to be possible when all the looseness' and play come together in a perfect storm, so to say.
 

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Brings to mind the term”cruiser ready”..............maybe the old man knew a thing or two when he taught me how to have a shotgun safely ready:unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I 'd never heard or realized that an 870 could do that. That's food for thought as we look back over the safety classes many of us may have taught to young hunters. The need to unload when crossing fences or maybe now even when we negotiate slippery or dangerous sections of terrain seem even more important in the light of this possibility.

When's the last time we thought of how some older or very worn 1911's could fire when disengaging the safety? That is supposed to be possible when all the looseness' and play come together in a perfect storm, so to say.
I can assure you that user error was the major cause with the 870s and the 410. They also hit pavement when they landed. Imagine standing in a truck bed and holding the gun over the side and having it slip thru your hand. That is kind of what happened.

Here's a video I found this morning that addresses the issue. I'm not saying he's correct, I don't know enough about it to say if he's right or wrong.

🔴 If You Own A Shotgun This Is A Must Watch - YouTube
 
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But unfortunately, it can happen when we least expect it. I can remember a number of times down through the years when I would trip, slip or stumble and then do all I could to keep the long gun in my hands and not pointing towards anyone else.
 

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Grizzley2 reminded me of an unforgettable experience with a Navy 1911 at the USN Pistol range at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi..back in the mid 60's, I was enjoying my only shore duty tour as a junior officer on the staff on the Advanced Training command, (I was the only LT...lots of Commanders and Captains)...my lunch hours were usually spent making noise and smoke at the range, located just across the street from the staff headquarters. I would mosey over, check out a rather well used 1911, and a box of 50...loading mags was the old way....no slick mag loaders now, and after a couple of mags, the third mag got my attention when the old slabside went full auto...not a lot of damage with only 7 rounds, but it made me a believer...and the Gunner's Mate was quickly at my side, grabbed the offending article, and disappeared...I didn't make it back to the range for a few weeks, but there were some really nice 1911's to select then.
 

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I won’t hazard a guess on the .410 but I find it hard to believe the 870 properly on safe would fire unless possibly very excessively worn? Now I know not exactly the same thing but the “emergency clearance drill” for an 870 jammed with a double feed is STILL to kneel down grab the forend with both hands and while being sure your muzzle isn’t pointed at your head😳 to SLAM the butt on the ground and it (usually) didn’t hurt the gun (works better with a plastic stock though 😉) I’ve done that and seen it done several times without an issue...and on some REALLY worn Police 870s at that....
 

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But unfortunately, it can happen when we least expect it. I can remember a number of times down through the years when I would trip, slip or stumble and then do all I could to keep the long gun in my hands and not pointing towards anyone else.
Absolutely right. You show me a person who knows he is above making a mistake, I’ll show you a fella a least one step down the path to an accident.
 

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I had an “AD” once in a worn Savage 220 as a kid when I closed it probably more forcefully than I should have. The extractor/ejector on those when you broke it open was supposed to push the firing pin back in and cock it, and the safety was then automatically engaged. The extractor was worn from as many times it had ridden up against the firing pin that the pin did not reset and was still out, when I slammed the action closed it fired....good thing my brother’s AMX was so short😉

Taught me a valuable lesson...

By the way, when it comes to “Accidental Discharges,” there are only three types of shooters if they actually shoot a LOT...1.) Those that have not had one yet but WILL, 2.) Those that will own up and tell you about their’s, or 3.) Those that will lie and claim “I’ve never had one and never will!”😉

That’s why the FIRST rule is always “Control that muzzle...”
 

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I had an AD once with my ‘97, my son and I are at the truck getting ready to walk in to our stands, right at legal shoot time, like 10 degrees and windy, I’m all set, loading up with my gloves on, lowering the hammer to half cock, slips BOOM deer slug into the ground😳. My 12 year old son on the other side of the truck says “What happened Dad?!?!?”

I was amazed at how smoothly I turned that into a “teaching moment.”

“Can happen to anybody, so always make sure you are not pointing at anything important, son!😉”
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I won’t hazard a guess on the .410 but I find it hard to believe the 870 properly on safe would fire unless possibly very excessively worn? Now I know not exactly the same thing but the “emergency clearance drill” for an 870 jammed with a double feed is STILL to kneel down grab the forend with both hands and while being sure your muzzle isn’t pointed at your head😳 to SLAM the butt on the ground and it (usually) didn’t hurt the gun (works better with a plastic stock though 😉) I’ve done that and seen it done several times without an issue...and on some REALLY worn Police 870s at that....
I know it did happen with the 870s, because I was there. No they were not excessively worn. One was a 16 gauge the other was a 12 gauge. I ended up buying the 16 from him and never had a problem with it. Oh, it didn't happen on the same date, two separate incidents. But I won't be slamming any of shotguns against the ground.

Since the person with the 410 is a relative, I'll find out more details on it.
 
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