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Discussion Starter #1
I have both the Lee and Redding push through dies and both are not much fun to use in a single stage press. Part of the issue with both dies is that the pusher bar moves around and does not stay in place in my Rock-crusher press. I use a bit of wire to keep it in place but you still need to use your hand occasionally to seat the pusher bar.

Anyway, in one batch of once fired cases I have there is a lot of bulged cases - probably about 10% of the total. I have been dreading the bulge fix process but I am getting to the point now where I need to fix the cases.

I see the Lee push through die instructions say that you can reload the cases first and then use the push through die as the last step. This has an advantage in that you could load the cases, then identify only those rounds that do not chamber and apply the push through die on only those cases (i.e. 10%).

Is this an easier way to deal with bulged cases or should I de-bulge 100% of the cases before I reload them?

Thx...
 

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I never gave much thought to a sequence. I just pushed them through the Redding bulge removing die then tossed them into the brass bucket to be reloaded. I usually debulge a few hundred at a time and I too use a RockChucker single stage. Sometimes it's a bit of a battle to get them de-bulged.

Wouldn't you have trouble pushing them through your decapper/sizing die if you didn't de-bulge tham first?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I use a Dillon 550b for reloading and I have no problem sizing de-capping and loading a bulged case with RCBS dies. Apparently, when you re-size in a standard die the die does not go down far enough to remove the bulge.

Some once fired brass shipments have no bulges but others are packed with them.

For me, de-bulging has to be the least favorite task in this hobby. It is a mind-less and thank-less task.
 

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I'm with you on the fact that debuldging sucks. But it's a necessary step with .40 and it's high pressures. but I would do 100% of them as much as it sucks.

I use my rockchucker and will do a couple hundred or so at a whack until I munch through enough to start loading on a 1000 pack of bullets.

I've not had any issues with mine, not sure why yours isn't cooperating. I have the Redding GRx BTW...

But do not debuldge loaded cases, just not a good idea from reading the insert instructions. My guess is it would squish the heck outta the case where it's holding the bullet in place.

or are you saying that you want to debuldge in the dillon after the resizing die? not sure how that will be any different than the single stage as you'd have to pull the case off the top of the die and re-insert in the next spot in the shell holder plate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Naa....

I would load 100% the cases in the Dillon 550. Then I would do a plunk test and separate the bulged cases (completed ammo) that refuses to chamber. I would then take the loaded bulged ammo that will not chamber and run it through the Redding or Lee bulge die in the SS Rock-chucker press.

The Lee directions for their push through die specifically says the die can be used on completed ammo.

I have tried running a few completed ammo cases through the push through die and it works OK. At first it seemed a tad dangerous, but I am somewhat comfortable that these will not go bang on the bench.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't think the push through dies will change the taper of completed ammo but I could check it before and after with a mic I suppose....
 

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After dealing with the pains of debulging 40 brass I have come up with a few solutions. First sell your guns chambered in 40 or at least rid yourself of those of unsupported chambers that create the bulged brass and purchase an aftermarket barrel. Second, purchased roll sized brass from www.precisiondelta.com
once you have debulged range pickup brass its no longer an issue for some, but if you are constantly shooting-bulging, debulging then resizing the same casing I'd be suspect of work hardened brass where the bulge is occuring near the head. After two loadings I'd be tossing them and avoid the potential risk. All the reason to go back to solution #1 above.
 

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I use a Dillon 550b for reloading and I have no problem sizing de-capping and loading a bulged case with RCBS dies. Apparently, when you re-size in a standard die the die does not go down far enough to remove the bulge.

Some once fired brass shipments have no bulges but others are packed with them.

For me, de-bulging has to be the least favorite task in this hobby. It is a mind-less and thank-less task.
"Apparently, when you re-size in a standard die the die does not go down far enough to remove the bulge."
I believe you are correct, now that I think about it.

"For me, de-bulging has to be the least favorite task in this hobby. It is a mind-less and thank-less task."
I couldn't agree more.

I'll be doing a bit of debulging in a few weeks. I'll need to pull the Hornady LNL down and remount the rockchucker to do it. I have a small workspace so it's one press or the other.
 

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I debulge all my 40 brass using the Lee FCD. It is a boring job but it goes pretty fast. About 95% of the cases go though with little effort, but every now and then one takes a good hard whack to get it though the die.

My brass comes from a busy indoor range and I never know which brass is mine and which came from some one else so I debulge them all. I've put several thousand rounds though my M&P .40 and have not had a single failure to feed.

I view debulging as just another necessary step in the reloading process. With .45 ACP the cases have to be separated by primer size, 9mm has to be sorted by military vs non-military, and .40's have to be debulged. All those steps are boring and time consuming, but they need to be done if you want to avoid problems and produce good reloads.
 

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You can apply some case lube.
I would be concerned about why the "pusher bar" won't stay in place like another shell holder.
I use the little Lee Reloading Press ($25) and have no major problems.
I started debulging because of the raised "bead" (see Lee's picture with the debulger kit) that would form from the bulge, so debulging before sizing eliminates that ridge and allows all rounds to chamber.
 

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Don't sell your Glock if you're worried about continuous buldging each firing; you can buy drop in barrels or go all out and put in Bar-Sto fitted barrel, but there's plenty out there that support the chamber better.

Lone Wolf barrels are good and support considerably more of the chamber/brass and are fairly inexpensive. I've got one in my G23 and it's a bit tight (the chamber), still need to loosen it up or re-cut the chamber but it's quality.

and stay on the light end of powder charges, don't load max loads in the .40 if you're getting buldges.

I tried lubing and without (Redding doesn't recommend lube IIRC) and no difference that I could tell in effort. I've also got the carbide one if that makes any difference or not.

Never thought about using the Lee FCD to remove the buldge, pretty cool idea although I don't see it speeding anything up.

bottom line, it's an extra step that kinda sucks but worth it to me as I've had my G23 go boom and it ain't pleasant.
 

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I run all 40 brass through the Redding carbide die, I get it from my local range so who knows what brand of gun it came from. I do use some One Shot and noticed it makes the operation a bit smoother. The bottle adapter and a 2 litter pop bottle make it pretty much hassle free.

Sure running every piece of brass through the Redding die sucks but I don't have problems with loaded ammo and that brings piece of mind.
 

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I also use the Redding Die and I just ran about 300 .40 casings. I had a little trouble with the pusher moving around and jamming at the top as you describe. What I learned was that I was the one creating the problem. When I'd place a new shell I'd unknowingly pull the shell holder out a smidge. Just anough to cause a poor fit at the top, missing the entry point of the die.

When I slowed down a bit and paid more attention to what I was doing the problem went away.

ocymmv
 

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I have some of the same concerns that 312shooter had. Unfortunately tossing out my Glock 22 is not an option for me. I just like the thing too much. It fits my hand. I bought it in 1993 just before Slick Willies Assault Weapons ban went into effect. And from day 1 it has been my American Express, I never leave home with out it.

Now I can afford to get into reloading and I have started to collect some equipment. Up to now I have not been saving 40 brass so this was not an issue. I will want to reload .40 but I have run into the issue of Glocked Brass. Ok so there is a die that will fix that. Cool problem solved. But not really.

Metal fatigue has to set in at some point. The wall of the casing has to be thinned when it bulges. Pushing it back into shape cant make it like new. So there is a weak point in the case. If that case is re-chambered in the same fire arm in the same orientation as when it was first fired then the unsupported area will be the weak point of the case. Ok that is a one in a million chance but considering that you only get two hands and one face and a cartridge explosion could cost you all three… Or, am I just over thinking this.

It’s a serious question for me. Is it safe to fire a round from a Glock 22 .40 pick up the brass, de bulge it case prep it, reload it to spec no hot loads. Then re-chamber the brass in the same Glock 22 .40 and fire it again, and again, and again.

I have this really bad feeling that if I get 20 answers to the question 10 will be yes and 10 will be no. Any of you guys that have experience with this I could really use some advice.
 

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I don't have a Glock, but I believe you can get a new barrel that is fully supported. That should take care of your concerns and is a lot cheaper than buying a new gun.

I've loaded about 2,000 .40m rounds using nothing but range pick up brass. I also have two 5 gallon buckets completely full of .40 brass that has been deprimed, cleaned, and de-bulged. So far I have not found a single split case. I have found many 357 sig that were split around the neck and a few .45 ACP that had splits in the case body, but have not had to reject a single .40 S&W or 9mm because of case splits.
 

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My rule is: If I can easily see and feel the bulge, the case is ruined. It gets crushed and thrown away. All the rest goes through the Bulge Buster.
 

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I've been reloading for over 35 years, and I had to look this one up because I have never heard of such a thing! All I have to say is that I sure am glad I don't own any of the guns that need to have this done to once fired cases. While searching info on this I found on the Lee sight "A bulge buster", and this information:

Glock Cases: We do not recommend "fixing" cases fired in pistols with unsupported chambers, because there is no way to make them safe once they have bulged. The case wall is thinned where it bulges, and resizing the outside of the case back down to the correct diameter does not restore the case back to its original thickness. If this case is fired in a pistol with an unsupported chamber again, and this thinned section of brass happens to line up with the unsupported part of the chamber, there is a high probability that the case will rupture.
 

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Is this an easier way to deal with bulged cases or should I de-bulge 100% of the cases before I reload them?

Thx...
you should de-bulge if you 1) own a glock and use the factory barrel, and/or 2) use range pickup brass or other already fired brass...

i have both bulge busters (Lee and Redding), it goes much smoother if you lube the cases with either some case lube or sizing wax...
 

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I put the brass (about 100 at a time) in a zip lock bag and give them a couple of squirts of Remington dry lube, close the bag, and tumble them around to get even distribution. That makes a big difference in the ease of de-bulging.
 
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