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Clean shiny brass is very over rated and unnecessary.

The results from a vibratory cleaner are more than adequate. I don't like using any liquid cleaning method on my brass as it is difficult to be sure it is all out. I also will NOT clean the brass by de-priming it first. That can lead to media getting stuck in the primer hole causing a problem as only the primer goes off and the bullet travels half way up the barrel (been there done that!).

In a vibratory cleaner you have two choices and two different results:

1). Walnut shells media that aggressively removes the powder fouling, leaving a matt like finish. But just the act of sizing the clean brass burnishes the brass surface to a mild shine.

2). Corn cob media that polishes, rather than thoroughly cleans, right over some of the residue powder fouling on the outside of the case.

I suppose a person could use the walnut media followed by the corn cob media (??) but that is more than is necessary.

The brass cases need to be cleaned such that no grit from the fouling scratches the chamber when the loaded cartridge is put into the chamber of the gun. Anything more than that is wasted energy and work. Shinny cartridges don't shoot any better than ones cleaned in walnut shell media.

Any small amount of fouling left on the inside of the cases after vibratory cleaning is actually a necessity for reloading. It lubricates the bullet as you seat it, keeping the bullet from grabbing the case walls through excessive friction. The cases are sized a few thousandths smaller than the bullet diameter and the bullet has to stretch the case open to enter. A dry new case is much more difficult to seat a bullet into than a fired and vibratory cleaned case. In most cases the case mouth lube (NECO graphite like products) are unnecessary if there is still some residue of fouling in the case mouth (vibratory cleaner will NOT remove all the fouling inside the cases).

Shinny cartridges are not necessary. And if you store the polished ones for very long then the surface gets tarnished anyway. So why waste your time and money just to have shinny cases for a while? It makes no sense to me. But I'm a shooter, not one to gloat over friends about how shinny my brass is.

LDBennett
 

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We all get to choose. I made my choices as shown based on my needs, my available time in the reloading area, the volume of my reloading lots, and the amount of effort I wanted to use to get good shootable ammo. Your needs may vary as will your choices.

As an aside I have many calibers of centerfire handguns for which I reload. I NEVER have had to clean any of their primer pockets in many reloading of the cartridges for these guns over my 25+ years of reloading. I also have NEVER trimmed any of those cases, many decades old and reloaded many times.

I have gotten a combination of corn cob media and Dillon liquid polish stuck in a primer pocket when I de-primed before cleaning. When shot, the bullet lodged in the barrel as the powder did not go off but the primer did. My then pre-teen was shooting the gun. He had enough common sense to put the gun down and get me. If he had shot the gun with the stuck bullet who knows what the results might have been but none I can think of would be good for him or the gun. De-priming after cleaning assure any media caught in the primer hole will get pushed out by the de-priming pin of the sizing die. I no longer use any polishing liquid in my media and only use walnut shell media.

A pretty product is not why I reload. I reload to allow me to shoot more as commercial ammo is expensive and would seriously limit my shooting if that is what I had to use. I can count on both hands the number of boxes of centerfire ammo for handguns I have bought over the last 25+ years. I started shooting centerfire handguns with my reloaded ammo and continue to this day.

I do clean rifle primer pockets but only when I trim the brass which is only as needed, perhaps every third or fourth reload. I have a motorized RCBS case trimmer and a motorized RCBS station with de-burrin tools and rotating brushes to clean primer pockets. I clean the primer pockets because it is easily done on my setup when I trim.

I do it my way because it fits me and you can do it however you choose so it will fit you. As long as it makes good, reliable, accurate ammo who cares. Appearance of the resulting ammo is all personal and NOT part of good, reliable, accurate ammo but only nice, in my opinion.

LDBennett
 
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