Question for Sabashimon

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by RunningOnMT, Apr 25, 2009.

  1. RunningOnMT

    RunningOnMT New Member

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    Being a member of the IDF I thought you might be able to enlighten me a bit on something I'm curious about. I haven't made any plans to leave the U.S. as of yet but have just kind of kicked around the idea of immigrating to Israel depending on what events transpire here. How possible is that? Are there any restrictions on immigration of non-Jews? What are the requirements for citizenship? What restrictions are there on private firearms ownership in Israel? Would appreciate any info you can provide that would help me determine if this is a viable option.
     
  2. sabashimon

    sabashimon New Member

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    ROM,
    It is easier, through the Law of Return, to gain Israeli citizenship if one is Jewish.....however it is possible otherwise. You must reside in Israel for at least 3 out of 5 years preceding the application. You can live in Israel as a Temporary Resident, for a number of years, I'm not sure how many. A non-Jewish friend of mine lived in Israel for 20 years as a Temporary Resident.
    For more information, I've posted below the phone number of the Israeli Consulate in Chicago, which is probably the closest to you.
    As for carrying firearms in Israel, unfortunately as an overreaction to the assasination of Prime Minister Rabin in 1995, the State severely tightened up the laws as to who could carry.
    To be honest with you, because you never served in the IDF, and unless you chose to live in Yehuda and Shomron (the West Bank), the chances of you being granted the right to carry in Israel is somewhere between slim and none.
    I hope that helped (?) a wee bit. If you're serious, give the folks in Chicago a call.
    Here's the number:

    (312) 297-4800
     

  3. Just curious, Shimon, does Israel put any language requirement on residency or citizenship? I know the vast majority of Israelis speak English as well as modern Hebrew (and many several other languages as well! ;)), but is a working knowledge of Hebrew actually required by law?
     
  4. sabashimon

    sabashimon New Member

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    No Pistol, there's no language requirement. Most immigrants recognise the utility of learning Hebrew, and take classes, however there are people of various origins that have been there for twenty years and can just manage a barely passable Hebrew.
    I would say that while you can get by without Hebrew in Israel, you'll never be fully integrated in the society or the culture, consequently those that primarily speak only in their mother tongue tend to hang with others like themselves, and in my opinion, are missing out on a lot (though they might not see it that way).
     
  5. Thanks, Shimon, I appreciate the insight about a most interesting culture. May I ask another question along the same line about your homeland? Is Yiddish still spoken commonly in Israel, at least by the very elderly, or is that considered to be in bad taste? I remember reading that when Israel came into being, there was a concerted effort made to avoid the language, mostly because of its association with the old European Jewish (Ashkenazi) culture, and obviously of course, the Holocaust. Is that true? Does one hear Yiddish spoken at all in modern Israel?
     
  6. sabashimon

    sabashimon New Member

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    No problem Pistol, glad to help.
    Circumstances have changed since the early days of the country, when survival was still a question, and Yiddish was seen as a vivid reminder of a time and place that proved to be, shall we say....unhealthy for a Jew.
    Today there's enough self confidence in who we are so that hearing Yiddish is more of a quaint reminder of a culture that once enveloped a third of our People.
    You hear it from time to time amongst older folks (without any negative conotation), and certain familiar idioms have become commonly interspersed in everyday Hebrew, even amongst the younger generations.
    It is such an amazingly rich language that it would be a crime were it to die.
    I actually know a couple of 50ish women who teach it, so there must be some interest in keeping it alive.
    Hope that helps.
     
  7. It most certainly does. Thanks Shimon. :) The culture and history of Israel, and of the Jewish people, are studies I find most fascinating indeed, and language are a life-long interest of mine. I think it is well that Yiddish has lost some of its negative connotation in the Jewish homeland. While that negative connotation is certainly understandable, the richness of European Jewish culture was great, and much of that was reflected in its language. So much of value would be lost if Yiddish were to become dead language. I even find myself using terms from the language from time to time. The terms "schlamiel" and "schlamazel" often come to mind, for example, when I think about the current administration in Washington. :D;)
     
  8. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Just as an aside, I recall reading that Charlie Chaplin, the well known film comedian when asked if he were born Jewish replied 'I am afraid I did not have that honour'.
     
  9. RunningOnMT

    RunningOnMT New Member

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    Thank you much for the information Shimon. As I said I have made no clear decision to leave...it's just that I fear everything the United States has stood for is being systematically dismantled. I would leave rather than live here without our constitution.

    Israel is a nation I believe in and would gladly fight for and support so I could see immigrating there if necessary and I was able. I have saved the embassy number you provided and will use it when I have come to a clear decision on whaT want to do.

    Not being able to carry is troubling but something I could probably accept realizing I would be immigrating to another country and need to conform to their laws. Hopefully at least being able to keep arms in your home is allowed. I'm curious though. It would seem to me that living with the constant terrorist threat as Israelis do, that everyone would be encouraged to carry arms.
     
  10. Trouble 45-70

    Trouble 45-70 New Member

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    I have seen 2 pre WWII moves in Yiddish with English subtitles. They were very good. I would enjoy seeing more if I could find them. It would be a shame if the surviving Yiddish plays and films were lost. Kind of like the old Cajan music.