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My reloading room has a tile floor, so your answers may vary. This is just for fun. I also use a single stage press and a Lee handheld priming tool. So, I am handling components several times during the reloading process.

So you drop a primer or bullet on the floor. How far will the primer/bullet roll and where will it be found?

The primer, if you find it, will be at least halfway across the room and probably under something. A dropped bullet will definitely be under something and difficult to find.

What's your experience? Make it fun.
 

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I don't know why it happens but almost everything I drop hits the toe of my shoe, so it takes off in any direction it wants to. On top of that I'm far sighted so even if it is laying right in fron of me I can't see it until I get it focused with my glasses. I do a lot of listening when I drop things then I got around tapping on things to see what makes that sound. LOL
 

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If you have a good relationship with the Lord and remember to ask him for help before you spend 1/2 hour crawling around on the floor it would help. Often times I'd apologize for failing to ask Him for help and my eyes would almost instantly fall upon the missing part.

My gunsmith friend says he's spent half his life looking for small parts on the floor.

I hate to think how many primers may be on my basement floor around my bench. I may have to get down again if I run out.
 

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My bench has a 2" space from the floor to a solid shelf. Nine time out of ten times whatever I drop goes under the shelf. I got down on all fours last week with a flashlight and found primers, bullets, several brass casings, a couple screws as well as dust bunnies. Same thing happens when I drop my meds, I have had them go into the floor register, under the frig, under the dining table leg, its irritating.
 

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Still have a small rifle primer hiding in my basement. Dropped things have minds of their own.... Evil little minds. Took my Colt .22 M4 ALL THE WAY APART for a thorough cleaning (The manual says not to do this). The "receiver" is a split aluminum shell with lots of little springs and ball bearings Carefully put it back together but the bolt stop wouldn't work right. A little spring popped out and I didn't see it or notice it. After an OMG moment - I saw this little 1/16th inch spring laying on the far side of the bench. Figured it belonged in the receiver s-o-m-e-w-h-e-r-e then had to figure out just how it went where it did - and how to get it back in.

I put this under 'reloading related' because I used my reloading bench - I mostly use it when I have to disassemble firearms for cleaning. PITA. Maybe that is why the dang Germans said not to take it all the way apart?
 

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I do not have a gun room. The kitchen is my gun room and my wife does not care. Terrible place to do gunsmithing work. A couple of years ago we gave a china cabinet to my brother in law and I found several springs and pins. Funny thing I don't remember for which gun they were because I just bought replacement parts. So when ever I get a stupid idea to disassemble a firearm to the level a real gunsmith does, I may do it in the walk-in shower now, with my luck it will go down the drain.
 

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So my reloading/man room has a concrete floor with epoxy coating. Sounds great right? Epoxy covered concrete, easy to clean pretty durable, ect. Well when I did the epoxy it has those little plastic chips you sprinkle on the wet epoxy. Makes it look nice. In hindsight it's an absolute nightmare when you drop a small pin, spring, primer basically anything lol. I can't count how many times I've been on my hands and knees hunting for some small part I dropped. I now either use a magnet if it's steel or I turn the lights off and use a flashlight and lay it flat on the ground. Hard to explain but anything sticking up on the flat floor is easier to spot with the flashlight. So yeah I diffentily know how you feel. I honestly don't really even look for a primer. If I don't spot it pretty quick then I just assume it's lost until the vacuum eats it. Lol
 

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No, No, No, I do not crawl on the floor no more. Went to the fabric store, bought a piece of fabric, put it under the press. Now when I drop some thing, it does not bounce into parts unknown.
I do my meds over a hand towel.

So my reloading/man room has a concrete floor with epoxy coating. Sounds great right? Epoxy covered concrete, easy to clean pretty durable, ect. Well when I did the epoxy it has those little plastic chips you sprinkle on the wet epoxy. Makes it look nice. In hindsight it's an absolute nightmare when you drop a small pin, spring, primer basically anything lol. I can't count how many times I've been on my hands and knees hunting for some small part I dropped. I now either use a magnet if it's steel or I turn the lights off and use a flashlight and lay it flat on the ground. Hard to explain but anything sticking up on the flat floor is easier to spot with the flashlight. So yeah I diffentily know how you feel. I honestly don't really even look for a primer. If I don't spot it pretty quick then I just assume it's lost until the vacuum eats it. Lol
You need a magnet on a string, just wave it around over floor.
 

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She was mad, but I gave her fair warning three times! This is on my wall now, after a whole bunch of spilled magnum rifle primers were found in the carpet by the ex. FYI...a Hoover upright has a full auto cycle rate about 300rpm.

 

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Not reloading related but I dropped a .22 LR on shag carpet in the 70's and didn't realize it. My wife found it with the vacuum. It scared the bejeezus out of her when it went off. She was not a happy camper.
 

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Cured 95% of that difficulty. My shop is in the basement so yeah, concrete floor. HOWSOMEVER!!!!! A couple big rugs cured the vast majority of that bouncing around problem. Nearly everything just lands on the rugs and stays there. In years past I have chased pieces and parts all over a couple basements and garages.
 

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on you hands and knees? not me. my two most used and loved tools are 1, a picker-upper has a squeeze handle on one end and two padded jaws on the other. picks things up my hands have trouble with, and no bending over. 2, a magnet on a pole stick. as to hard floors, most hardware places sell soft rubber mats, easy on your back, things do not go as far when dropped. come on guys work smart not hard. save yourselves for those "honey do" things that you really like to do.

rick
 

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Mine usually go 2 different places. Sometimes under my bench and sometimes into my trash can where i usually dump all my used primers. So either i'm on the floor with a flash light looking though sawdust and spider webs or i'm looking through my trash can for 1 unused primer amongst hundreds of used ones!:mad:Don't get me started on where springs go!
 
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