Question on .223 reloads

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by St0rmCr0w, Jul 17, 2020.

  1. St0rmCr0w

    St0rmCr0w New Member

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    Hello,
    I am just about embarrassed to ask this but I must. I have been reloading for sometime now, mostly .300 Win Mag and 7mm Mag. I have just got a new .223 bold action and am getting around my needed components to reload, and I am a bit puzzled. I found myself not being able to find .223 bullets anywhere. While looking on line when I search for .223 bullets I get directed to 22cal (.224 dia) bullets. Is this correct and why I can not find .223, or is this a misdirection on my search?

    Thank you for pointing me in the correct direction.
     
  2. howlnmad

    howlnmad Old Guy Doing Things Moderator Supporting Member

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    No such thing as a dumb question when it comes to reloading. The .224 is the proper diameter for the 223. I have no idea why they do that.
     
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  3. St0rmCr0w

    St0rmCr0w New Member

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    Thank you, that one was driving me crazy. :)
     
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  4. Gudaki

    Gudaki Well-Known Member

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    That is correct.
     
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  5. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    Just a tidbit of information for you that you might not know. If you are reloading for a bolt action and you are only firing YOUR brass in it, you can use a Neck Only Sizing Die. But if you are buying once fired brass or using range pickup, you will need a Full Length Sizing Die.
     
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  6. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    Because bullets are generally sized .001 over groove diameter, unless you shoot cast then .001-.002 over is common.
     
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  7. Don Fischer

    Don Fischer Well-Known Member

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    Yep, 223 takes 224dia bullet's. Someone correct me on this though. Didn't someone make 23 bullet's for the old 22 Hornet? Seem's they didn't shoot that well from 224dia barrels. If you run into some of them, I'd leave them be.
     
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  8. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    George - you are again absolutely correct - they CAN go with a neck-sizer reloading die, but in this instance I advise against it. Unless this person is a Bench Rest Match shooter, they are much better served with a standard Full Length Sizer. After a few firings with a neck sizer - the cartridges become hard to chamber. This could lead to problems if that rifle was used for game or varmints. I suggest a standard FL reloading die set and a Lee Factory Crimp Die.

    A little back-story: I hadn't fired my .303 for years until my grandson came down last week. My ammo has been reloaded (neck-size only) maybe 3-4 times. About 20% of the cases proved hard to fully chamber (the bolt handle had to be forced down to full-closed). The .303 is notorious for large chambers and is hard on Full Length sized brass cases, and that is why I only neck size them - makes the brass last more reloadings.

    FL sized ammo is much more reliable in the field for general use than is neck sized ammo. And you are absolutely correct that a case be full length sized if range pick-up or fired in another rifle. Most critical for this person is the rate of barrel twist and bullet weight.
     
  9. BlackEagle

    BlackEagle TFF Chaplain Supporting Member

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    I'll second what gdmoody said about neck sizing. I neck size for my bolt action .223, and when the bullets start getting hard to chamber, I full length size the brass.

    Of course, these bullets are only good for this particular gun. I can't let someone else use them in his gun because the cases are fire formed to my chamber.

    The others have answered about .224 bullets in a .223 gun.

    Have fun. What is your barrel twist? That will help determine which bullets you get, and which powder you use.
     
  10. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I'm a big fan of tailoring ammo to a specific rifle. I neck or partial size (leave the shoulder alone) until a fired case gets hard to chamber, then bump the shoulder back until it chambers with just a tiny bit of resistance. Gets better accuracy and extends case life. Always check each finished round to make sure it will chamber. As essentially a hunter, I want all my ammo to go bang on demand. :twocents:
     
  11. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    No rhyme or reason to cartridge nomenclature. The 222 Remington and 222 Remington Magnum have the same groove diameter as the 223 and also take .224 bullets. The OP's 7MM mag.'s bullet diameter is .284; 7mm actually coverts to .2756. Go figure. I remember a very interesting (and amusing) thread on that subject a while back. Makes handloading a fun, interesting hobby. :)
     
  12. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    pdk, correct me if I'm wrong, didn't some of the old Hornets take .228? I think Don is right about the old Hornets taking different size bullets but I thought they were bigger, not smaller.
     
  13. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I think some of the early Hornets took a .223 bullet and the 22 Hi-Power (AKA 22 Savage) takes a .228. Not sure if either are still being made. Sierra used to make the .223 for the Hornet and Hornady made a .228, but a quick search didn't turn up either.

    Edit: My bad. My trusty copy of COTW confirms that some of the early Hornets used .223 bullets. Sierra's online catalog lists two currently available; 40 and 45 grain. Can't find a source for .228s. COTW lists the Hi-Power as obsolete.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2020
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  14. Firedog

    Firedog Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I never full length sized until just a few years ago, but I only had one AR 223/5.56 and one hunting rifle 7.7 Jap. Now that I have 4 AR'S in 223/5.56 and 4 308 rifles I full length all now because I dont keep brass separate.

    knock on wood never had trouble until recently, some brass got through the process.
     
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  15. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    Ahhh....ok. I knew something took a .228 and obviously I forgot about the 22 Hi Power. That cartridge used to be quite popular in German break action firearms of all kinds and I thought they still chambered it because it is still popular for Reh deer.....but I might be nuts too.
     
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