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I think the 25X45 will make a good hunting cartridge.
In the past I have done a lot of work with the 6X45 and found it good for deer and just plain old target shooting. I always used a 63gr Siera hollow point with out standing results.
Since the 25X45 is just a tad bigger,:), I expect that you will have the same results.
I do think that the 25X45 is a good cartridge that fills the gap between the 223 and the 300 Black out.
 

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Actually, I thought that for software load data approximations, you needed the internal case capacity after seating a bullet. Total case capacity means nothing, only the actual available powder volume.
 

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I`m fond of the 6.5x39, reach out and whackum.
Sub MOA shooter all day long on standard AR platform and very light recoil.
 

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Actually, I thought that for software load data approximations, you needed the internal case capacity after seating a bullet. Total case capacity means nothing, only the actual available powder volume.
You need the total case capacity. You then remove some of the capacity by deciding your bullet depth in your case which now gives you a different capacity. The "different capacity " is now the new numbers you work with. Change the bullet seating and you change the capacity and now you have to start all over.
 

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Some of the comments have been about burn rates. The Vihtabouri reloading guide has a burn rate comparison chart on page 48.

Did I read that the boxes of ammo have cartridges with different powders in them, or does each box have cartridges of all the same powder and there are several boxes of cartridges, each with cartridges having different powder? Or are there cartridges with different kinds of powder mixed up in the same box?

I have tailored my rounds to my gun using one powder. Other guys have tried various powders,and each time they try a new powder they have to fine tune the round by adjusting the powder. Different powders will give a different point of impact. They have to re-zero their guns for each new powder. If they change bullets they have to re work their loads for that gun.

Is Sharps giving you a selection of cartridges with different powders to build up load data for this new caliber?
 
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Actually, I thought that for software load data approximations, you needed the internal case capacity after seating a bullet. Total case capacity means nothing, only the actual available powder volume.
My Quickload software needs case capacity. It calculates available volume based on that, cartridge overall length and the specifics of bullet base.
 

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Actually, I thought that for software load data approximations, you needed the internal case capacity after seating a bullet. Total case capacity means nothing, only the actual available powder volume.
This is where reloading starts to become like alchemy. Like everything else, there are ALWAYS exceptions. So what I'm about to explain is not a hard rule.
Actual case volume varies from one manufacture of brass to the next. The thicker the brass, the less volume for powder.
When developing a load the ideal (IMHO) is to find a powder that completely fills the case with the seated bullet just touching, but not compressing the powder.
Again, there are exceptions. Some powders preform well compressed, others should never be compressed. But loading the same charge into mixed cases can result in different pressures.

Most never reload to tolerances tight enough to notice the difference.
 

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Total case capacity is the factor you have to have FIRST, before you calculate the available volume with the bullet seated so, to say it's meaningless is a display of ignorance or arrogance or both.
 
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Discussion Starter #29
Some of the comments have been about burn rates. The Vihtabouri reloading guide has a burn rate comparison chart on page 48.

Did I read that the boxes of ammo have cartridges with different powders in them, or does each box have cartridges of all the same powder and there are several boxes of cartridges, each with cartridges having different powder? Or are there cartridges with different kinds of powder mixed up in the same box?

I have tailored my rounds to my gun using one powder. Other guys have tried various powders,and each time they try a new powder they have to fine tune the round by adjusting the powder. Different powders will give a different point of impact. They have to re-zero their guns for each new powder. If they change bullets they have to re work their loads for that gun.

Is Sharps giving you a selection of cartridges with different powders to build up load data for this new caliber?
Ok I will try to answer.
I was told by sharps that they have 2 different loads for the same bullet due to having more then one manufactures that use different powders. They will not be mixed in one box.
The cases I will be getting were made by the same manufacture and if I order more all I have to do is say I want the same as my last order.
They said I will not notice any difference in the bullets but if I am concerned then say what I was told to say.
But that could mean waiting for my order while they are being made.
I can not answer your last question because I do not know what you are asking. (Dummie here remember)
 

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goofy
The difference between the two loads if done correctly , which I am sure has been done,
is the powder and nothing more.
Now in order to have the two cartridges to act the same with two different powders is rather simple. (if you have the money and test equipment:) )
What they have done is to have the powder adjusted to have the same CHAMBER pressure and the same END of barrel pressure. That means that you have two areas with the same pressure. If these two areas are identical then there will be no difference.
Now comes catch 22. All testing should be done at sea level and at 68 to 72 degrees.
You don't live at sea level and I doubt that you will be shooting all the time at 68-72 degrees.
This is where you might see a slight difference in performance because the two powders can act differently because the test conditions have changed. How much of a change? Do you have a micromiter. The changes will be slight at best and will only matter if you are a hard core target shooter.
My suggestion to you is grab a box of each and go shoot some targets. And when you are all finished and done, pick the box you like best.

Gary
 

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I can not answer your last question because I do not know what you are asking. (Dummie here remember)
You are anything but a dummie!! You have skills and experience I could never even dream of getting. If you are getting started reloading, you will master that as well.

As far as reloading, we all have new things to learn.

This is a new cartridge in a new caliber. They have done a fair amount of research and development for cartridges for this gun in, as grcsat says, controlled conditions. By sending you these two sets of cartridges they may be looking to get some feedback on which ones work better from use in not quite so controlled conditions. I was just wondering if they were using you and probably others to get more data from a larger pool of users.

You may find that one box has better precision (tighter groups) than the other box and those would be the ones you want more of. Sharps would make a note of that for future reference.
 
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Discussion Starter #32
The problem is the boxes are not marked and the person you talk to only knows where they came from not the load they use.(I could not get her to tell me that) I asked about it and was told they would send me a e-mail or call me so intill then all I can do is ask that my ammo comes from the same place.
 

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Then you need to pull bullets from one round from each box. Then dump the powder into a scale to see how much each weighs. That scale should be capable of reading "grains", not grams. I have an extra scale if you're interested
 

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It sounds to me like the best way to insure they are all the same is to specify the manufacturer when ordering. But I still doubt the average shooter would ever notice the difference.
The average hunting shot (in my part of the country) is about 40 yards. Even a fairly large difference in pressure won't be noticeable at that distance. As few (or maybe none) of us have equipment to determine pressure we depend on our chronographs and feet per second.
Now for the real fun. Ambient temperature (a hot day) will impact pressure as well. We used to target shoot with the ammo in an igloo cooler during the summer because of that. But then most people don't use dimes and postage stamps for targets.
 
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