The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My father in law also has these old guns. He has little information about them, and almost no sentimental attachment to them. I'd love to know more about these and also what they're worth. From what I have figured out so far, they're dollar value is likely quite low, so you won't be hurting my feelings.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
First up, the .22 revolver, which is German born and marked "LA's Deputy." I don't know much about, but my father in law tells he bought this as a teen. I saw some posts about these being Colt replica guns which flooded the market from West Germany in the mid-60's.













---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Next up, is the .32ACP Eibar "Ruby." From what I've read online, this is a Spanish variant on the 1903 Browning design and was made for the French army. It does not appear that this one was actually issued (no stars on magwell area). My father in law says his dad carried it as a reserve sheriff's deputy during WW2. Other than that, I know nothing.







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
If you take off the grips on the revolver, there may be a manufactors name such as Herbert Schmidt. ADDED: correction, if you don't find the name there you should, Your gun was made by Herbert Schmidt { Germany } some time in the 1960's. The same gun was sold under more than two dozen different names under as many different importers. LA Deputy was sold by Precise Imports. It is not a top of the line revolver, but it is not the worst either, On a scale of 1 to 10, I would place it around a 5 { For that time frame in the 1960's} JMO:) Note, I can't quite read the markings on the auto, what does it read/
Just a few comments, I had already found the information I needed in the Standard Catalog and Guns of the World, but just for grins and giggles I googled LA Deputy, what did I find, One person said it was a Erma, an Erma??. come on now, several said it was a Great Western, mmm, they moved LA Ca. to Germany?, Several swore it was a Hawes, trouble with that is Hawes marked all their imports, two people said with out a doubt it was a Rohm, and the kicker, one guy said it sounded just like a S&W he had.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
Thanks for putting up good photos and doing some research in advance, spdski. Your Ruby-type pistol is exactly like those issued to the French army, and has a French-style serial number. However, like you said, most of the French ones are marked with stars. A lot of Rubies went to Italy and Belgium as well; I don't know if they would have stars or not. It is possible France did all the Ruby purchasing for the Allies.

A lot of Rubies were exported direct to the United States in the 1920's and 30's, but those should be marked "Spain" or "Made in Spain", and don't often seem to have been the plain wartime style. They generally had nicer bluing, blued or bright-polished triggers, and grips of hard rubber or horn. They often lacked lanyard rings, too.

Also, your gun is made by Garate & Anitua. During WWI, they made a substantial quantity of .455 revolvers for the British, and I believe they made 8mm revolvers for the French. Before WWI, they made an odd little automatic pistol that looked sort of like a miniature Mauser Broomhandle pistol, chambered for an obscure cartridge called 5mm Clement. Generally, though, the company is much better known for revolvers than for automatics, which adds interest to yours.

I can't tell you what your Ruby is worth. For decades, these guns were regarded as little better than junk. Lately, though, collector interest in them has been rising, particularly as they represent one of the few areas in which bargains and previously-unknown oddities can still be found. I would suggest you search around at firearms auction websites, especially *******.com (we are not allowed to post a link to it here).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Ruby pistols made for French use in WW-1 usually have French abbreviations for "Safe" and "Fire" on the safety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
The Bison still looks like an ugly Rhino.:) I can not find a current listing for your revolver, { not in the Blue Book nor the S C of F } however they are not high dollar items, the ones I have seen, were listed for 150 to 200. Your Eibar .32, even through made by one of the better makers is also not a high dollar item. If you have the magazine and it looks in fair condition, A WAG is 100 to 150. With out finding any on the auction sites and not being listed in any of the reference a WAG is the best I can do. Perhaps others??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
As per your Herbert Schmidt .22 SA revolver. I have alot of experience with them. For years I have made a bit of a hobby buying broken ones (and the very similar Italian Tanarmi models) cheap and repairing them.
These pistol have decades IMO received an unfair bad rep as "pot metal" junk guns. But we must remember that they were imported during the 1960's. During a time when when America was still the principle manufacturing nation in the world. And foreign made was considered a sign of inferior quality.
But the fact is that these guns could now be considered as ahead of their time. As many respected U.S. gun makers are now using, if not the same "pot metals" in their guns. Then something very similar. Such as the receiver on the Ruger 10/22. Not to mention the use of plastics.
These were/are actually IMO pretty sturdy and reasonably well made guns. Basically with very minor differences, faithful scaled down copies of the classic Colt design. They perform the same as the old Colts did. And suffer from the same drawbacks. Number One IMO being lack of adjustable rear sights. There's a reason why adjustable rear sights were developed for handguns. That being that short barrels very often do not shoot exactly to point of aim. And application of "Kentucky Windage" is needed to shoot accurately.
But IMO the principle problem with these guns was the "cheap" label they received as result of both their price tag and foreign MFG. People just didn't seem to think that they deserved to receive the same care and cleaning they would afford a more expensive gun. And as a result these guns often were regarded as "Tackle Box" of Truck/trunk guns". Used and returned to place of storage w/o cleaning. With the inevitable end result of them becoming so rusted and/or junked up internally that they broke or could no longer function.
Neglect has been the principle culprit in 95% of the guns I've repaired. Very often a good internal cleaning was all that was needed to fix them. Occasionally a replacement small part such as a spring.
The classic Colt design is very easy to disassemble/reassemble. Many illiterate old west cowboys learned to do it. And now we have Youtube to teach you how. So search Youtube for Colt SA revolver dis/reassembly. Take it apart and give it a good cleaning and lube. Then enjoy your revolver. It should last as long any other gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,292 Posts
I've got a question.

Both RJay's post and the OP's picture shows the Buffalo as coming from "Germany". There was no such place as Germany in the 60s. There was West Germany and there was East Germany. Two separate and distinct countries.

I have seen pre-war guns marked "Germany". I have seen post-war guns marked "West Germany". But I have never seen a post-war (prior to the reunification) gun marked "Germany". Whassup wid dat?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,720 Posts
I've got a question.

Both RJay's post and the OP's picture shows the Buffalo as coming from "Germany". There was no such place as Germany in the 60s. There was West Germany and there was East Germany. Two separate and distinct countries.

I have seen pre-war guns marked "Germany". I have seen post-war guns marked "West Germany". But I have never seen a post-war (prior to the reunification) gun marked "Germany". Whassup wid dat?
I dunno but I'd like to get my hands on one or an RG 66.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
I've got a question.

Both RJay's post and the OP's picture shows the Buffalo as coming from "Germany". There was no such place as Germany in the 60s. There was West Germany and there was East Germany. Two separate and distinct countries.

I have seen pre-war guns marked "Germany". I have seen post-war guns marked "West Germany". But I have never seen a post-war (prior to the reunification) gun marked "Germany". Whassup wid dat?
I don't know. But I never saw one marked West Germany.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
I dunno but I'd like to get my hands on one or an RG 66.
I'd take the Herbert Schmidt or Tanarmi over an RG-66. But the RG-66 was IMO the best of the RG line.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top