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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off hello...new to the forum and kinda new to the firearms in general.

Currently I have a Henry single shot 223 and Hipoint 995 carbine (9mm) but every time I take em out with vim and vigor I can see $$ flying down range and looking rather envious of my buddy shooting his 22lr pistol and rifle with nary a care about how many rounds he shoots.

So I've been looking at a 22lr revolver...read and watched lots of reviews on every option I could find. What's important to me is accuracy...out to 50yds and beyond. I think with that in mind the shorter barrel models are out. Been looking at a minimum 6.5" but more so at the 9" Rough Rider or 12" Wyatt Earp model. The 16" rough rider seems a bit too...well...odd for my tastes. Then comes in the selection of sights...fixed or adjustable. And, what I'm learning, is that not all 22lr rounds behave the same. This added knowledge isnt helping! Suppose I could opt for the rough rider tactical and put something like a red-dot on it.

The Heritage line has been my focus due to initial price buy in and decent reviews...seen lots of really nice high quality revolvers but usually between $500 and $1k kicks me out.

Sorry for being a bit long winded but I would greatly appreciate helpful comments.
Tom
 

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What's important to me is accuracy...out to 50yds and beyond.
The Heritage line has been my focus . . .
These two statements don't seem to coincide, LOL. I love my Heritage Rough Riders (I have 4) but tack-drivers . . . they are not.
Here's a Guns & Ammo article from a while back, where they review the 6.5" barrel as well as the 16" monster.
The 6.5" barrel yields 2.5" groups at 25 yards, all hitting about 2 inches left of center off a sandbag. The long barrel model, OTOH maintained sub-1" groups from a sandbag.
 

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If accuracy and longterm reliability is a concern skip the heritage and go to a Ruger Single Six . Nothing against the heritage . Have one and enjoy it for what it is , a low cost plinker.
He said price was a big issue.
I'm lucky - one of my Single Six's cost me $100, the other was free.
I, too, would be hard pressed to be able to afford a brand new Single Six.

I originally bought a 6.5" Heritage for farm carry, so I wouldn't beat up one of my Rugers.
For $139 with both cylinders it was a good deal. And accurate as either Ruger at barnyard distances.

I liked it so much that over the years I bought two more, a 3.5" Birdshead and a 4.75".
All wear the magnum cylinders, all get carry time around the homestead. Good working guns.
 
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Ruger does make some very nice, reliable, inexpensive and accurate .22 revolvers. I've seen them well under $200 new. If you want a .22 revolver that will last you - go with the Ruger. The Single Sixes are more expensive, but they are even higher quality. If it were me - I'd save up another month and go with a Single Six. If I had to have one yesterday - I'd go with the newer, less expensive Rugers (and still get a quality pistol).
 

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Now is a rough time to try and buy anything even of moderate quality. At the big Tulsa show Single Sixs we’re going for $750+ and even they wouldn’t make a good 50 yard gun. To attain that kind of accuracy I think you’re looking at something along the lines of a S&W 617 or better and they aren’t giving them away. Sounds like you may be looking for a target handgun with a entry level price. Now wait, my brain was stuck on revolvers. As a kid I had (still do) a 4” Ruger Mark I with a scope and was popping 12 gauge shotgun shells at 50 yards so maybe look for a good used Ruger Mark Series??
 

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First off, let me say that handguns and accuracy at 50 yards (and beyond) is a stretch and usually takes years of practice. In order to not disappoint and frustrate yourself start close, say 10 yards or so and as you master the techniques you can increase your range. TV and movies have done a great disservice to the shooting public in making us think that 50, 75, even 100 yard offhand shots are easy with a handgun. They ain't!
Secondly, are you dead set on a revolver? The Ruger Mk series or the Browning Buckmarks (my personal favorite) are great little guns that are plenty accurate. They won't break the bank either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
All great reply...thank you....greatly appreciated...I have looked at the Mark IV, the Victory and Buckmark and have been drooling at each :p, each in their longest barrel...found an example of each for at or under $400. So I need to reconsider...one never regrets buying quality...until the bills come in!
Re the $200 ruger wranglers they look great but I have not yet found a review where accuracy was touted as being a remarkable attribute. Appreciate the link also...thanks...
Funny...I understand the distance challenge especially with progressive lens...I'm finding both of my rifles are useless to me at 100yds without some kind of optic...begging the question why do I think 50yds with a handgun is going to work?!
Thanks for the all the comments....greatly appreciated!
Tom

Ok...so after rechecking youtube wrangler reviews found some pearls...one guy shooting 130yds and hitting about 1/2 tie time...then there is Hickok45 hitting the 80yd gong every time!
 

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one never regrets buying quality...until the bills come in!
Buy once, cry once. Daddy always taught me to get the absolute best of something that I could reasonably afford. I've cheaped out a time or two and always regretted it and wound up eventually buying what I originally wanted. God gave us piggy banks for a reason!
 

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Skip a Heritage and get a Ruger Wrangler or if you can afford more a Ruger single six. Nothing against Wranglers I must have five or six of them in different configurations and they're neat fun cheap little guns but for a gun you can shoot for the rest of your life then give to someone else get a Ruger.
 

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All great reply...thank you....greatly appreciated...I have looked at the Mark IV, the Victory and Buckmark and have been drooling at each :p, each in their longest barrel...found an example of each for at or under $400. So I need to reconsider...one never regrets buying quality...until the bills come in!
Re the $200 ruger wranglers they look great but I have not yet found a review where accuracy was touted as being a remarkable attribute. Appreciate the link also...thanks...
Funny...I understand the distance challenge especially with progressive lens...I'm finding both of my rifles are useless to me at 100yds without some kind of optic...begging the question why do I think 50yds with a handgun is going to work?!
Thanks for the all the comments....greatly appreciated!
Tom
Tom - a basic is that a pistol is a pistol: a short range firearm. NeoBlackdog nailed it. I've used a lot of pistols. If you are going to be shooting for accuracy at a distance over 50 yards - use a rifle. IMHO a pistol is good out to 50 yards, but you won't be 'driving tacks' at that distance. More like pie-plate accuracy. I am no Sergeant York or Daniel Boone, but to me decent accuracy at 25 yards with a pistol is acceptable. There are custom guns set up to deliver that accuracy to 50 and 100 yards, but those are special guns and well beyond (at least) my personal abilities.
 

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I wanted a 22 revolver for several years, I considered the cheaper models but could never bring myself to buy one. Fast forward a couple years and I finally ran across a deal on two. First one is a S&W model 17-3 that I picked up for $500 and then a Stainless Ruger Single Six that I got for $350. There are deals out there you just have to be patient if you want a quality revolver for a decent price.

Prices seem to be softening a bit in the gun market.
Good luck on your search
 

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Tom,
One thing nobody asked yet is "What's YOUR idea of accuracy at 50yds?".
As far as sights go, if it's only going to be a range gun, get adjustable sights.
Barrel length. I'm a sucker for for long barrel revolvers just because they're different. In theory the longer sight radius makes aiming easier but in reality excessive length makes the gun nose heavy and you can end up chasing the sights as the muzzle is wobbling around in front of you. On a .22 stick to something between 6" and 10" max.
 

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Back in 1986 S&W was sponsoring the Masters Pistol Championships on the Metcalf farm, of whom Dick Metcalf the writer was part of that family and which S&W sunk a ton of money into what had become PASA Park in Barry, Illinois, they had 3 shooting disciplines. Long range pistol from 75 to 200 yards, an Action event on plates up close and a .22lr Precision Event at 25 and 50 meters. The tournement attracted the pros as well as many of us Sportsmen who wanted to see how we faired against others around the country and some from around the world who came. The .22 handgun precision event was always the event that determined the winners, since it turned out to be the most difficult. Trying to remember the target sizes, they were something like 2.5" and 4.5" at both 25 and 50 meters. The ones who were able to turn in really good scores usually had a Bullseye background or practiced their heart out learning to make those one handed shots at those distances. It can be done, but it takes lots of good ammo, a decent handgun with a great trigger and a grip that fits you well. Balance is important as is learning to shoot as the target goes by, because holding steady on a small 50 meter target is not something a human can do offhand. But it was loads of fun practicing. The first year I used a 10" Ruger MK2 with the barrel lightened by slab siding. The second year it was a nice older S&W model 41 with the longer barrel - 7" or so. I much preferred the Smith. The newer ones are not up to the standards of the older production models. When looking for that first .22, I had just missed an add in our local shopper for a Ruger MK1 that had been worked over by Clark, about the best in those years. Drats,. There were numerous old High Standards, which I think the winner the first year used. In time, things like Hammerelis and other pure target pistols were showing up. I could be wrong, but in the years I shot or attended, I'd be surprised if a single action revolver was ever entered.
The Masters and its Guns - The Masters International Shooting Championship (lasc.us)
 

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I've got a couple of Heritage revolvers.
They shoot as well as any other revolver with iron sights.
That being said, Heritage now offers a "tactical cowboy" which has a Picatinny rail and a threaded barrel.
It's a 6 round revolver with a MSRP of $212.88.
Not a bad price for a proven revolver.
And Taurus now makes the Heritage line if that is a consideration for you.
 

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I've got a couple of Heritage revolvers.
They shoot as well as any other revolver with iron sights.
That being said, Heritage now offers a "tactical cowboy" which has a Picatinny rail and a threaded barrel.
It's a 6 round revolver with a MSRP of $212.88.
Not a bad price for a proven revolver.
And Taurus now makes the Heritage line if that is a consideration for you.
didnt Heritage have issues with catastrophic failures? thought it was something to do with the mag cylinders
 

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Tom,
One thing nobody asked yet is "What's YOUR idea of accuracy at 50yds?".
Funny thing about that.
If someone takes a gun to the range and can't hit anything, it's always the guns fault.
If that same someone takes a gun and manages bullseye.......he's the expert marksman.
But back to the Heritage.
My first one, a birds head RR consistently shot to the right.
I put it in the vice and put an adjustable wrench on the site and tapped it ever so gently with a small mallet.
Now it's dead on. The elevation isn't as easy. Even with an inexpensive gun like the Heritage I won't be filing the front sight.
But after one shot I know how to aim it.
In my opinion optics and scopes have their place but not for good ole' backyard target practice.
If I can't hit my target that's on me.....if the gun won't fire, that's on the gun.
 
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