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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody reload for the 270 Weatherby Magnum? looking for a Good match of bullet and powder 150 grain bullet for Elk hunting. And the only primers I have for large rifle are Remington large rifle primers. any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Umm, you"ll Probly want magnum primers first of all. Then a good magnum powder, Ramshot, RL22, something like that. Start looking through the manuals. Should be no problem finding an excellent bullet, Probly a soft point if hunting is in your plans.
 

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Reloading.speer.com

They list 16 powders for their 3 150gr bullet options, you might find a powder available from that list. Federal 215 primers BTW.
 

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Hodgdon’s online load data can help as Hodgdon distributes,
Hodgdon
Winchester
IMR
Accurate
Ramshot

Their load data is at,
hodgdonreloading.com

At Hodgdon’s homepage, scroll to the bottom where there is a list with SHOP as the first item. This will take you too a list of the gunpowders Hodgdon sells online. All the various gunpowder brands and types will show if they are available or not. Keep in mind that if Hodgdon has a certain gunpowder available on their retail website, other major online retailers will most likely have it in stock. With each gunpowder brand and type if clicked on the listing picture will have a description of the gunpowder and it’s cartridge type usage.

One more point. Most magnum rated gunpowders are long relatively large diameter kernel type. These can be a challenge to meter out to get a consistent weight drop. That’s assuming you are using a gunpowder charger like a RCBS Uniflow, or any other brand type. The trick is to drop a light charge 2-3 grains under the target charge weight, then use a gunpowder trickler with the grain scale to bring up too the charge target weight.

A few magnum gunpowders are of a spherical type. The will meter more consistent then kernel type gunpowders. The is a caveat to most spherical gunpowders as they generally have a larger muzzle flash which equates to a slightly louder muzzle report.

Another point is getting kernel type magnum gunpowder into the cartridge case. Several of the reloading equipment companies offer a small funnel with a long tube attached. Place the tube over the cartridge case mouth and pour the gunpowder in the funnel. This long “Drop Tube” helps compact the gunpowder into the cartridge so if you use a gunpowder with a high load volume, when seating the bullet, you’re less likely to crush any the gunpowder at top of the column of gunpowder in the cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hodgdon’s online load data can help as Hodgdon distributes,
Hodgdon
Winchester
IMR
Accurate
Ramshot

Their load data is at,
hodgdonreloading.com

At Hodgdon’s homepage, scroll to the bottom where there is a list with SHOP as the first item. This will take you too a list of the gunpowders Hodgdon sells online. All the various gunpowder brands and types will show if they are available or not. Keep in mind that if Hodgdon has a certain gunpowder available on their retail website, other major online retailers will most likely have it in stock. With each gunpowder brand and type if clicked on the listing picture will have a description of the gunpowder and it’s cartridge type usage.

One more point. Most magnum rated gunpowders are long relatively large diameter kernel type. These can be a challenge to meter out to get a consistent weight drop. That’s assuming you are using a gunpowder charger like a RCBS Uniflow, or any other brand type. The trick is to drop a light charge 2-3 grains under the target charge weight, then use a gunpowder trickler with the grain scale to bring up too the charge target weight.

A few magnum gunpowders are of a spherical type. The will meter more consistent then kernel type gunpowders. The is a caveat to most spherical gunpowders as they generally have a larger muzzle flash which equates to a slightly louder muzzle report.

Another point is getting kernel type magnum gunpowder into the cartridge case. Several of the reloading equipment companies offer a small funnel with a long tube attached. Place the tube over the cartridge case mouth and pour the gunpowder in the funnel. This long “Drop Tube” helps compact the gunpowder into the cartridge so if you use a gunpowder with a high load volume, when seating the bullet, you’re less likely to crush any the gunpowder at top of the column of gunpowder in the cartridge.
I am going to reload them by hand, just using my scales and trickler. I have Hornady 145 Grain ELD-X bullets that I load for my 270 Winchester. But for elk hunting i would like 150 grain bullets.
 

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An elk is not going to know the difference between a 145 grain bullet and a 150 grain bullet if you have placed said bullet where it needs to be. I use 130 grain Remington CoreLokt in my .270 Winchester because those are the bullets with the best accuracy. It's taken an even dozen elk over the years and each was a one shot kill.
 

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You may want an Innerlock type bullet. The hot cores or std psp bullets may come apart at those fps. Takes a good bullet if impacts are above 2800fps. Using the heavier bullets will drop the fps some but the energy will still be there.
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…I use 130 grain Remington CoreLokt in my .270 Winchester because those are the bullets with the best accuracy. It's taken an even dozen elk over the years and each was a one shot kill.
A .270 WCF is not a .270 Weatherby. That CoreLokt was designed for the velocity of the little case, not the larger magnum. There is often a greater difference in the velocities achieved by these two cartridges than many folks realize. For his Pet Loads series, Ken Watters chronographed 130 grain factory ammo in hunting rifles with these results:

.270 WCF - 2937 fps
.270 Weatherby - 3370 fps

That’s a difference of 433 fps, enough to raise doubts about the validity of comparing one bullet‘s performance between the two calibers. True, 5 grains of bullet weight is not enough to matter, but difference in bullet construction is. At Weatherby velocities the OP should choose a stoutly constructed bullet for his elk hunt.




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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A .270 WCF is not a .270 Weatherby. That CoreLokt was designed for the velocity of the little case, not the larger magnum. There is often a greater difference in the velocities achieved by these two cartridges than many folks realize. For his Pet Loads series, Ken Watters chronographed 130 grain factory ammo in hunting rifles with these results:

.270 WCF - 2937 fps
.270 Weatherby - 3370 fps

That’s a difference of 433 fps, enough to raise doubts about the validity of comparing one bullet‘s performance between the two calibers. True, 5 grains of bullet weight is not enough to matter, but difference in bullet construction is. At Weatherby velocities the OP should choose a stoutly constructed bullet for his elk hunt.




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Thats what im trying to find, a powder bullet match for the high velocity of the Weatherby. A bullet thats not going to tumble or come apart in flight to the target.
 

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A .270 WCF is not a .270 Weatherby. That CoreLokt was designed for the velocity of the little case, not the larger magnum. There is often a greater difference in the velocities achieved by these two cartridges than many folks realize. For his Pet Loads series, Ken Watters chronographed 130 grain factory ammo in hunting rifles with these results:

.270 WCF - 2937 fps
.270 Weatherby - 3370 fps

That’s a difference of 433 fps, enough to raise doubts about the validity of comparing one bullet‘s performance between the two calibers. True, 5 grains of bullet weight is not enough to matter, but difference in bullet construction is. At Weatherby velocities the OP should choose a stoutly constructed bullet for his elk hunt.
Not my point. I used the Core Lokt as an example of what my rifle likes. I'm encouraging the OP to not get 'lokt' into a 150 grain bullet but to keep his options open and to find the bullet that his rifle likes best and that will still be suitable for elk. Heck, those 145 grain ELD-X bullets that he already has might be just the ticket.
 

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Thats what im trying to find, a powder bullet match for the high velocity of the Weatherby. A bullet thats not going to tumble or come apart in flight to the target.
It would be hard to beat the Nosler 150 Partition and IMR7828. In spite of being old-skool the bullet is well-proven in various high velocity .270s, and that powder gives among the highest velocities with that bullet weight. Hodgdon lists appropriate data for both on their website, with a maximum velocity over 3200 fps.




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It would be hard to beat the Nosler 150 Partition and IMR7828. In spite of being old-skool the bullet is well-proven in various high velocity .270s, and that powder gives among the highest velocities with that bullet weight. Hodgdon lists appropriate data for both on their website, with a maximum velocity over 3200 fps.




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I saw that, and with the 130 grain SPR SP it's at 3,500! Zoinks! That's gettin' into laser beam territory!

Wagsrx, whatever combo you end up with I'm sure everyone would like to hear about it. Post up some target pics!
Oh, and it's an unwritten rule that everyone that responds to a post like this gets a slice of backstrap if your hunt is succesful. Just FYI...;)
 
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