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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm working on a Remington Nylon 66 that won't cock by hand when the cover is on, except sometimes when the safety is on. That's right, intermittent. On rare occasion, it will cock normally with the cover on, but that is so rare, not more than once in 20 tries, I debated leaving it out of the discussion entirely.

Without the cover, it cocks beautifully. If I cock it and then put the cover on and load it, it cycles perfectly with 100% reliability. If I pull the trigger with an empty chamber, it's in trouble again.

Here's the really strange part, when the cover is off, if I press even lightly on the Cartridge Feed Guide (#9 on Remington spare parts list), it won't cock. I take the pressure off, cycle it a few times and it cocks again. I cannot find any connection between the Cartridge Feed Guide and either the sear or the safety.

I cleaned it with brake cleaner, lubed it with graphite and then gun oil and then cleaned it again with brake cleaner. No combination of wet/dry/oily/clean made any difference. I'm getting a blister on my index finger from working the bolt handle.

I've run multiple searches with different key word combinations and I haven't found any other report of a problem like this. btw - Date code is June, 1960. There are some small gouges where somebody used a screwdriver to pry the cover off, but otherwise everything looks about right.

Help!
 

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90% of the time the problem will be carbon/grit on the working surfaces. The other 10% will be weak springs. Check the sear spring and sear, and give special attention to the disconnector, disconnector pivot and disconnector spring. You don't want to "over-do-it", but the moving parts must be lubricated and clean in order to function properly. The won't run smoothly dry. Too much lube attracts carbon and gunk. Not enough and it's like rubbing two pieces of sandpaper together.

I wouldn't use graphite for lubricant. Much better to use a good gun grease (I like Lucas gun grease from the auto parts store).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thank you. This is the oddest I've ever seen.

When I first looked inside, the action was clean and dry so I don't think dirt is the issue. I'd been hoping not to have to take the action apart as far as the springs, but I'll learn something in the process. I'll check Midway and Brownell's for spring sets. If they or Wolf don't have the springs, I'll check McMaster Carr for stock springs I can modify. (I'm not a pro gunsmith, but I've played with a lot of machines over the years.)

Update 5:45 PM - Found the springs at Numrich. Ordering Sear Spring, Disconnector Pivot Spring and Trigger Spring.

When I oiled it, I used a generous amount of Hoppe's Gun Oil. I wasn't worried about dirt, only that everything was lubed. It changed nothing except giving me oily hands. After a quick spray with brake cleaner, a minor amount of the oil remained in the action. No cleaning or lubrication made any difference.

My available greases and lubes are: Lubriplate, synthetic disc brake grease (very sticky), Vaseline and my old favorite, Moly Graph. I also have some spray on dry lubricants, Dry Moly and DuPont Teflon Dry Film. With the sprays, I'd only be treating the metal parts and letting them dry, the solvent can mess up plastics. Which would you recommend?

Any guesses how the receiver cover and the Cartridge Feed Guide tie into the problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Remington nylon rifle users manuals say to NOT lube the working parts!
I noticed that too. There is a vague exception noted but no specifics. In all the Nylon 66 comments I've seen, they all seem to say "Clean every 20 years or so." and almost nothing about lube. When I tried the graphite and oil, it was desperation as I hadn't found anything else and thought it was worth a try. I figured the graphite was a safe dry lube to try. Brake cleaner washed it all out quickly.
 

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Thing is that when the Army brought out the M16 it was also claimed to be "self cleaning" (and so no cleaning kits were issued with them), and a lot of GIs died because of it.....
Jim, my understanding is that blunder fell squarely on the shoulders of Kennedy's brainiac dream team (they had a nickname that escapes me). Didn't they decide to change gun powder for the .556 and it was filthy stuff leading to all the jamming of the M16? Dirty bastards.
 

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Thing is that when the Army brought out the M16 it was also claimed to be "self cleaning" (and so no cleaning kits were issued with them), and a lot of GIs died because of it.....
The reason a cleaning kit and instructions were'nt issued with every M16---One of McNamaras genius idiots read the specs on the "Self cleaning gas tube"...and since he had zero experience with firearms he extropolated that NO cleaning was needed....When designers/staff were true gun people,crap like that did'n happen.....And yes the calcium carbonate in 846 is a nono for gas tube.
 

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Jim, my understanding is that blunder fell squarely on the shoulders of Kennedy's brainiac dream team (they had a nickname that escapes me). Didn't they decide to change gun powder for the .556 and it was filthy stuff leading to all the jamming of the M16? Dirty bastards.
The "Whiz Kids". The Army didn't want to give up the M14 that they worked so hard to get adopted, but the Air Force and Marine Corps liked the M16 (AR15). The propellant originally used by Stoner worked well, but in an attempt to scuttle the M16 program, Army Ordnance made the change to a Ball-Powder as used in the 7.62mm NATO and changed the rifling rate of twist to stabilize the bullets (the Marine Corps liked the original rate of twist because the bullet caused more damage to flesh on impact and made it more lethal). The change in powder, the twist rate and the lack of cleaning gear all came out in the Ichord Hearings.
 

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Watch break parts cleaner around plastics. True break parts cleaner will dissolve plastic.

This cover your speaking of - if it has screws make sure they are correct length and diameter. If incorrect they may be putting pressure on other parts. If the shield is bent or incorrectly fixed that may give problem.

Look for something in the way with it installed that is not there with it off.
 

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I'm working on a Remington Nylon 66 that won't cock by hand when the cover is on, except sometimes when the safety is on. That's right, intermittent. On rare occasion, it will cock normally with the cover on, but that is so rare, not more than once in 20 tries, I debated leaving it out of the discussion entirely.

Without the cover, it cocks beautifully. If I cock it and then put the cover on and load it, it cycles perfectly with 100% reliability. If I pull the trigger with an empty chamber, it's in trouble again.

Here's the really strange part, when the cover is off, if I press even lightly on the Cartridge Feed Guide (#9 on Remington spare parts list), it won't cock. I take the pressure off, cycle it a few times and it cocks again. I cannot find any connection between the Cartridge Feed Guide and either the sear or the safety.

I cleaned it with brake cleaner, lubed it with graphite and then gun oil and then cleaned it again with brake cleaner. No combination of wet/dry/oily/clean made any difference. I'm getting a blister on my index finger from working the bolt handle.

I've run multiple searches with different key word combinations and I haven't found any other report of a problem like this. btw - Date code is June, 1960. There are some small gouges where somebody used a screwdriver to pry the cover off, but otherwise everything looks about right.

Help!
Dry firing a rimfire is a big no no. Brake cleaner is bad news on plastic/synthetic stocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Dry firing a rimfire is a big no no. Brake cleaner is bad news on plastic/synthetic stocks.
I tested a small, out of the way bit first. Whatever is in the local generic brake cleaner, a quick spray and drip dry doesn't affect the nylon. I can't speak for other brands and I'd be scared to try carburetor cleaner.

On the dry fire, normally I'd agree, but the Nylon 66 lets the bolt close on an empty chamber. The first you know it's empty, is the click. I take that as an indication that it was designed to accept dry firing in the course of normal usage. Otherwise, the design would self destruct fairly quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Watch break parts cleaner around plastics. True break parts cleaner will dissolve plastic.

This cover your speaking of - if it has screws make sure they are correct length and diameter. If incorrect they may be putting pressure on other parts. If the shield is bent or incorrectly fixed that may give problem.

Look for something in the way with it installed that is not there with it off.
The screws appear to be originals in good condition. Whether they are in or out, makes not difference. It's the presence of the cover in normal position.

There's some minor damage from an idiot with a screwdriver, but otherwise, everything is flat, straight and a nice fit.

There's an odd relationship between the forward edge of the sear and the disconnector. You have to push the disconnector forward slightly to position the sear under it, in working position. It's something to watch in assembly (I think).

Thing is that when the Army brought out the M16 it was also claimed to be "self cleaning" (and so no cleaning kits were issued with them), and a lot of GIs died because of it.....
True about the M16, but the Nylon 66 is legendary for running decades without cleaning. When I started researching it, it's the first thing I found.
 

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I would avoid any harsh chemicals like carb or brake cleaners. I would take of the top cover, spray it, and the area around the bolt and chamber with knocker loose, or similar aerosol rust loosener. I would soak it real liberally and let it sit for a few days. Also run a wet patch of it through the butt tube, with the mag tube removed.

After 48 hrs. Wipe it all down real well. Use lint free patches to wipe it down. Put everything back together dry, and spray with compressor air, or air in a can.

If this doesn't do the trick, replace your springs/parts as previously recommended. I find that 95% of the time, function problems with semi-auto rimfires are cured by a thorough cleaning. The (most) crap where they eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would avoid any harsh chemicals like carb or brake cleaners. I would take of the top cover, spray it, and the area around the bolt and chamber with knocker loose, or similar aerosol rust loosener. I would soak it real liberally and let it sit for a few days. Also run a wet patch of it through the butt tube, with the mag tube removed.

After 48 hrs. Wipe it all down real well. Use lint free patches to wipe it down. Put everything back together dry, and spray with compressor air, or air in a can.

If this doesn't do the trick, replace your springs/parts as previously recommended. I find that 95% of the time, function problems with semi-auto rimfires are cured by a thorough cleaning. The (most) crap where they eat.
It was clean when I first opened it. It's even more sanitary now.

I placed the Numrich order for the springs on Friday evening, they'll be processing it tomorrow. The question is will it arrive before or after next weekend? The question after that is how long will it take me to install the new springs and get everything back together.

From the comments here, some of you seem to think that I just willy nilly hosed a 60 year old nylon classic with brake cleaner.

I didn't.

I began with a Q-Tip saturated with brake cleaner and tested it in an unobtrusive spot inside the stock. Only after that test showed no reaction did I use the brake cleaner for general cleaning. I'm an old engineer, I test things carefully betore I commit to general usage.

btw - Brake cleaner is pretty close to a chemical mix Birchwood Casey and others sell for gun cleaning. It's major action is to disolve oil and grease. It has relatively little cleaning or solvent action on everything else. Carburetor cleaner on the other hand will disolve your sneakers and usually leaves a trace of oil behind.

Test before use.
 
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