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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a Remington model 514 barrel which I want to use in restoring a Remington model 514 rifle.

The barrel is generally in good shape (has good bore with well definded rifling) but needs to have the exterior re-blued.

Problem is that there is a VERY (about 1/8" long) small gash/nick in the metal about 2 inches behind the muzzle (not deep enough to hurt the integrity of the barrel) which is too deep to sand out without flat spotting the barrel (this is an actual small cut in the metal and not pitting created by rust). Someone has struck the barrel with or on something in the past.

My question is, is there a way to FILL IN this gash with some type of metal (possibly by welding process) that will not create a problem with that spot being re-blued ?

Thanks.
 

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My guess would be no, but I have no experience or first hand knowledge to go from. Welding on the barrel will affect the temper of the barrel. Once welded, it would have to be ground or machined back smooth. One option though, since it is so close to the muzzle is to cut it off and have it recrowned. If that leaves you with enough barrel, that could be done.
 

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If you want it to be re blued then that is tough.
Yes it could be tig welded but only by someone who is VERY good with a tig welder.
Solder will not blue.
So you could solder then duro coat(paint) or nickel it.
But Helix would be the one to ask about that.
Mike
 

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I have done at least a dozen MIG welds on guns and see no problem with doing a small weld on a .22 barrel. After a skilful weld it can be cleaned up with a file, then abrasive papers in finer & finer grits till it is ready to be prepped with the rest of the barrel for bluing.

It is likely that due to adding a different steel in the weld to the barrel steel, it will blue somewhat differently, in shade of blue, etc. In my experience it is definitely visible but not conspicuous.

MIG or TIG welding is highly localized and doesn't heat the entire piece sufficiently to affect temper. In a barrel there is rarely any temper or heat treat to consider.
 

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I replied to this topic on the other forum you posted this on.

At first I couldn't figure out what happened to my reply.
 
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No need to weld anything from what I can see. Peen the raised portion down and draw file it then sand it smooth. Hit it with some Brownells 44/40 or OXPHO-BLUE cream cold blue. Once you get that to the desired darkness oil it real good and let it sit.

You could also use silver solder. http://www.brownells.com/search/index.htm?k=silver+solder&ksubmit=y

If you don't care if you blue it or not You could always fill the gash with an epoxy like jb weld and then sand smooth and coat barrel and action with Gun-Kote or duracoat.
 

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Easy and perminant, silver solder and coat it with cerakote or duracoat
Perminant and matches, tig weld with a heat stop and sink, lash sand and re-blue.
Oxfo blue never matches original blue but its as close, 44/40 matches better but does not have the shine. I would tend to stay away from JB weld bc it lacks elasticity to handle expansion of a hot barrel if it gets to that.
 

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Or if youre like me. Leave it be, appreciate the character of the rifle, dings and all, and shoot targets with it.. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No need to weld anything from what I can see. Peen the raised portion down and draw file it then sand it smooth. Hit it with some Brownells 44/40 or OXPHO-BLUE cream cold blue. Once you get that to the desired darkness oil it real good and let it sit.

You could also use silver solder. http://www.brownells.com/search/index.htm?k=silver+solder&ksubmit=y

If you don't care if you blue it or not You could always fill the gash with an epoxy like jb weld and then sand smooth and coat barrel and action with Gun-Kote or duracoat.
I just don't think there is enough "raise material" to peen.

This gash is almost like a cut in the metal (almost like it was cut with a hacksaw) and the metal is GONE, not just pushed aside like the dirt would be in a crater created by a meteor impact.

Thus I think this is going to have to be FILLED IN with some other metal and then smoothed back down by sanding and buffing.

Thanks.
 

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Pays yer money and takes yer cherce --
Weld it, polish it for an hour or so, cold blue it and still see it
Or
leave it, put a dab of cold blue on the bare metal and still see it -
I vote for dab it and leave it -
my tuppence
 

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Why no reply to another thread you posted here?

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=124195

I took the time to try to find a solution and even offered to do it myself if need be.

I get tired of taking the time to answer and/or look for parts for those that don't even acknowledge the effort. In fact I quit doing it from now on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Why no reply to another thread you posted here?

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=124195

I took the time to try to find a solution and even offered to do it myself if need be.

I get tired of taking the time to answer and/or look for parts for those that don't even acknowledge the effort. In fact I quit doing it from now on.
I have attempted to contact Aperture N More but I have not yet heard back from them.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Brownell's sells this stuff for bluing solder (if you solder it):

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t.../brownells-silver-solder-black-prod17662.aspx

Thanks but if I can get this nick in the barrel fixed, then the complete barrel is going to be hot blued by a professional firearms re-bluer, and I don't think he is going to be trying to do spot touchups on a barrel that he has just hot blued.

What I need to know, is how this nick can be filled in and yet still be able to be PROPERLY hot blued along with the complete rest of the barrel's surface.

Thanks.
 

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Here is the problem with TIG, the filler metal, Since rifle barrels are an alloy it is probably not possible to match the barrel with the the filler in order to get a perfect match for bluing.
Common barrel steels

4140—Ordnance steel or chrome-moly steel, it has 0.4 percent carbon and is really strong while still being cost-effective to machine.

4150—The same as “ordnance” steel but with the carbon content upped to 0.5 percent. 4150 holds up better to serious abuse, and it’s found primarily in mil-spec AR-15 barrels.

41V45—A chrome-moly variant, it has a dash of vanadium in it. This is an alloy selected to produce hammer-forged barrels.
8620—This is a full-up alloy of nickel, chromium, molybdenum, with 0.2 percent carbon.
 

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If you are set on it being hot blued then tiging it is the only way to make it work but keep in mind IT WILL NOT MATCH close but not exactly.
As was said you can't match the steel of the barrel with a rod that is the same.
22WRF hit it on the head with the difference of steel(Good job 22RWF nice info.)
So you have your choices let us know how you are going to go.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you are set on it being hot blued then tiging it is the only way to make it work but keep in mind IT WILL NOT MATCH close but not exactly.
As was said you can't match the steel of the barrel with a rod that is the same.
22WRF hit it on the head with the difference of steel(Good job 22RWF nice info.)
So you have your choices let us know how you are going to go.
Mike
I just talk to a guy who is a life long professional at hot bluing, etc. and he said to TIG weld it with very low carbon steel (whatever that is) and then to file the weld down to match the barrel surface and he could re-blue it.

Thanks.
 

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That's the beautiful thing about TIG. While not ideal to get a pretty bead, you can fill weld materials with scraps of the same material. a tig works my arcing a tungsten electrode, that doesn't melt (as long as you know how to use the dang thing
), it flash melts the steel around it with a white hot arc of electricity. touching the electrode to the filler material and the spot on the barrel will result in a dab of filler material permanently and seamlessly bonded to the barrel.

Sometimes, if the materials just been displaced you can kiss it with the electrode for a split second and the displaced metal will be melted and redeposited in the 'hole', at which point you just draw file it til its smooth and blend the file marks when you prep the surface for reblue.

I keep a scrap parts bin half filled with old worn out gun parts. All I do in a case like this is find one that has a similar shade of bluing, chances are its close enough to the same type of steel, and use it as a filler. You have no idea how many dings ive filled with the same old rear sight leaf that has a boogered dovetail. It works, and its a good way to fill weld with the proper material.
 

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I weld up nicks all the time and if using a good seasoned bluing salts and blending right its really hard to see. nice thing with the laser welder is it can be fill welded using a sample piece of metal from the same barrel. silver solder blackening chemicals work ok but the level of black is totally different.
 

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Interesting in discussions such as this how many feasible fixes are offered and how FEW replies are from us with actual hands-on experience.
 
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