Reviving an older pistol

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by stymie222, May 13, 2009.

  1. stymie222

    stymie222 New Member

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    What kind of cleaner/lubricant would you use on a pistol (25 auto) that hasn't been fired for decades and you don't want to take down ?
     
  2. pinecone70

    pinecone70 Active Member

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    I'd take it down, make sure everything operates and there's no rust.
     

  3. Tom Militano

    Tom Militano New Member

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  4. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    make that 3 for taking it down. If you will post the make model number Ill go through my books and see if I have a schematic for it. All guns were made to be taken apart. And that is the ONLY way to properly clean and maintain them.
     
  5. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    There are books that allow you to field strip the gun and books that allow you to totally strip the gun to the last part. If you don't feel confident to do the total strip then do the field strip and either blast the crud out of the remaining parts or soak the gun in a solvent by submerging it with agitation for hours and hours. But make sure all remaining parts will not be hurt by the solvent soak. Then use a lubricant like BreakFree that migrates and really soak the gun in it. Allow it to sit a few days then blow out any pools of it that remain. Wipe the gun down and then use it. If there is rust present nothing short of a total tear down will do.

    You said 25 auto? If it is one of the Saturday Nite Specials, like a Jenning, just throw it away as these pot metal guns are more dangerous to the shooter than the intended receiver of the bullet, some of the time!

    LDBennett
     
  6. user

    user Active Member

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    Scrub it with a stiff brush, and lots of dish detergent and loads of water, like you would the wheels of your car. Use Gunk or Simple Green to degrease it if necessary. Let it dry thoroughly, then spray it all over with a thin coat of clear lacquer. Glue it down to a piece of a nicely finished red oak board with epoxy, put the board in a glass front box, and hang it on your wall.
     
  7. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    there at one time was a product called "dunk it" i believe it came in a 5 gallon plastic pail. it was used for situations just like this. now another option if you have a local car repair shop and are in tight with the owner ... they sometimes have safety Kleen or some other type parts cleaning tank. I've used a safety keen parts cleaning tank before and it worked great. had to blow out the gun with compressed air and relube everything but it sure removed the gunk.speaking of which there is also an automotive parts cleaner in a can called gunk out or something like that. it might work well for these types of applications
     
  8. stymie222

    stymie222 New Member

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    It's a C.G. Haenel Suhl Shmeisser Patent Model 1

    Cal.-6 (25auto) with capture papers (1945/German officer)

    After using "Break free cleaner", without take-down it is

    slightly sluggish on slide return,(snapped manually), firing pin operates- no rust.

    I believe this is a keeper.

    I am just wary of a take down without complete instructions.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2009
  9. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    stymie222:

    It is indeed a keeper and no Saturday Night Special.

    BreakFree will eventually float embedded crud out of the metal surface. I would clean it again with a more fluid cleaner, like Hoppe's #9, then again with BreakFree. Wait a few days and check it again and clean it again if necessary. If after several cleanings and the slide is still reluctant to operate smoothly and freely you may need to find a new recoil spring for it. I have no idea where (???). But repeated cleaning may solve the problem. Breakfree only gets stick like that when there is still crud to remove frorm the metal surfaces.

    LDBennett
     
  10. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    I have also use an auto motive parts washer with diesel to clean firearms. You can also use a small bucket and diesel. Point is, diesel is a wonderful degreaser and will not harm the finish or allow it to rust...

    directions for break down. it´s indeed a litle bit tricky:

    - pull back the slide and fix it in the rear position with the safety lever.
    - Pull out the mainspring rod against the tension of the spring and release with an angle to the former alignment, so it won´t go in again
    - pull out the barrel block to the TOP
    The notch at the bottom of the clip will fit into the groove on the front of the mainspring rod to pull it out (at least, if you got a genuine clip)
    Note, that there is an interlocking between the release of the clip and the safety lever.

    A schematic is available at www.again.net/~steve/page7a.htm There ia also a GERMAN SITE with photos and some english text. at www.vestpockets.bauli.at/ From looking at the diagram my GUESS is pull the slide back to clear the rails on the end of barrel then pull the recoil spring guide away from the frame to free barrel, lift barrel straight up and ease slide forward off frame . I do not have one of these firearms and am only going by the diagram, study it yourself before trying to disassemble. GOOD LUCK

    My books dont list this odd curiosity, only the brownings, which are similar in appearance but not at all the same. The above info was pulled from another forum that I am associated with... Best of luck

    JLA
     
  11. 45nut

    45nut Well-Known Member

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    Click here

    The internet is a wonderful thing, at times.
     
  12. stymie222

    stymie222 New Member

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    Thanks to all of you for your great help !