Revolver wonderwads

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by Driverdan, Mar 16, 2020.

  1. Driverdan

    Driverdan Well-Known Member

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    I just received my Uberti 1860 Colt, and look forward to test driving it. Since I am no expert on blackpowder revolvers (or much of anything else) I seek information. I purchased (from Dixie Gun Works) a bag of Wonderwads to seal the chambers and prevent chain firing. The Uberti owner manual does not mention wads, but says to use grease to seal chambers. (I did this on 1858 Remington and thought it to be messy). I ask, what are the opinions of those smarter than me on Wonderwads versus grease ?? Thanks...Dan
     
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  2. flintlock

    flintlock Well-Known Member

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    I used Wonderwads in my b.p. pistols, far more effective than filling the cylinder mouths with grease and a lot easier at cleaning time.
     
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  3. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I'd rather use lubed wads than grease on the mouth of the cylinder. Far less messy and I've never had a chain fire with them. The only problem I can see with a pre lubed wad would be if you leave the pistol loaded for any length of time without an over powder card between the powder charge and the greased wad. I suspect the grease could dampen the charge over time. I've never left one loaded for longer than it takes me to get from the bench to the firing line and shoot it till it's empty again so I can't say for sure if leaving it loaded for a few days is going to kill the charge. :)
     
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  4. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    They work just fine and as others have said, a lot less messy. Having said that, I used up the ones I bought 40 or more years ago and never replaced them or made my own....and I can't tell you why but, I went back to lube over the balls. It's as messy as it was before.
     
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  5. vassago

    vassago Well-Known Member

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    I tried the wads once but I went back to using lube cookies, I found the wads did not as great a job in keeping the revolver operating smoothly.
    With lube I could easily fire 50 rounds and the revolver would still be operating as smoothly as clean, albeit pretty greasy. With the wads after a shot or 20 the revolver would start to rotate heavier and heavier.
     
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  6. Driverdan

    Driverdan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies..I always thought the grease trick was real messy, so I am going to give the wads a try...just wasn't willing to try if others weren't impressed with them.
     
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  7. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    I always kept a small bottle of veggie oil and put a drop or two on the arbor or cylinder pin depending on if I was shooting my 1851 Colt or "58 Remington. The Remington liked a drop on the base of the hammer every second or third cylinder full.
     
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  8. vassago

    vassago Well-Known Member

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    That might have just done the trick, just somehow never occurred to me. The lube cookies just worked so I never looked for anything else.

    @Driverdan give it a shot and let us know.
    I always found the 1858 one of the most fun things to shoot and amazingly accurate.
     
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  9. Driverdan

    Driverdan Well-Known Member

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    .....helping out a roof on my son's house. Once that is done I hope to do some shooting !! Will let you know it goes....thanks, guys...Dan
     
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  10. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    The grease keeps the fouling soft but so does a drop or two of non petroleum based oil. On my Colt I would grease up the arbor with bore butter or wonder lube after cleaning the thing after a range trip on re assembling the pistol. The arbor has grease grooves and it holds the grease pretty well throughout a range day, the Remington has a smaller diameter pin and no grease grooves so it is more prone to needing a drop or two of oil every time I reload it to keep it running smooth. It also likes a drop of oil on the base of the hammer or fouling sometimes makes it miss fire by slowing it's inertia if it gets too dry. My 1858's are as accurate as my Ruger Bisley. My old Colt, not so much but then using the hammer nose for a rear sight probably had a lot to do with it. Both of my Remingtons had target style adjustable sights on them.
     
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  11. Driverdan

    Driverdan Well-Known Member

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    Sound like very good tips, thank you Grizzly.
     
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  12. BlackEagle

    BlackEagle TFF Chaplain Supporting Member

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    I have been making my own wads from wool felt. Make sure it's real wool, not synthetic. Synthetic will melt an foul the barrel.
    I use a recipe called Gatofeo 1 for the lube. It works well and clean up is easy.

    I posted it on another thread a few years ago. Don't try replying to that thread; it's three years old.

    https://www.thefirearmsforum.com/threads/wads-and-sods-and-cleaning.150730/page-3#post-1399374

    I believe there are some other lube recipes on that thread.

    Grizzley, I'll have to remember that trick with the vegetable oil for my Remington 1858 because that pin is always a bear to pull at the end of the day.
     
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  13. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    I learned that trick the hard way not very long after I got my first Remington 1858 wannabe, this is what they called the Buffalo Model. It's a brass framed "Buntline" style with a 12 inch barrel that has no real basis in history. I had loaded and fired multiple cylinders full using lubed wads and had a tough time getting the cylinder pin out for disassembly and cleaning. It was bound up, not in the cylinder but in the frame where the pin enters it at the rear. I had to remove the grips and soak it with WD40 by spraying it in the hammers opening to get it on the back of the pin and carefully tapping the front of the pin with a small chunk of hard wood to get the thing to come out. I've been pulling the pin and putting oil on it between loadings ever since. It hasn't gotten stuck in by fouling again on either of my '58s The other one is a steel framed with the standard length barrel but like the brass framed repo, it too has modern target style adjustable sights.

    Not to brag but the 12 barreled inch brass frame had no trouble hitting an empty cigarette pack nearly dead center at 25 or so yards and pop cans a closer ranges didn't stand a chance.

    The day I dead centered the cig pack was a lot of fun, I had a new BP shooter and his daughter and my youngest son up in the woods teaching my friend how to load and shoot his new rifle, I'd loaded up the Remington and let them shoot the first cylinder full I loaded a second and they wanted to see me shoot it. I took it one handed in a sideways old west gunfighters stance and Ray says hit the empty pack I put on that stump. So I took aim, fired my shot, hit dead center of the pack and put the pistol down and said you guys can shoot the rest of that cylinder at it. ( I wasn't about to take a second shot and spoil the illusion. );)
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2020
  14. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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  15. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    Nothing at all about lubewads or even black powder, just an off comment about Grizz's last statement. Last Friday I was at the range shooting some pistols. Shortly after my grandson and I got there, there were a couple of other guys who showed up. After a while of shooting, we were all standing around talking. I guess the one gentleman saw me ogling his Canik 9mm and we started talking about it. I said that I had been admiring them online and kinda wanted one of them. He handed it to me as said try it, so I took aim at an unused 4 inch target (about 7 yards) and fired - I hit dead center bullseye and handed it back to him. Just like Grizzley1, I was not about to take that second shot.