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Now that is very interesting! Here I thought I was just being a wimp or something. ;) Or that maybe the rounds of 357 I was using had too many grains. So maybe I'm worrying about the revolver unnecessarily. Hmmmmm. I didn't think it was that uncomfortable, but I found myself hesitating longer to pull the trigger trying to get myself ready for the kick. It probably could've gotten uncomfortable, but I only tried 10 rounds. I'm sure I'll be shooting mostly 38s in it anyway.
Careful with recoil anticipation. It will create near unbreakable shooting habits. Focus on your sight alinment with the target. Gently apply more and more pressure to the trigger while you concentrate on your sight picture. If that rifle goes off and startles you every time youre doing everything right.
 

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And the GP-100 is a pussycat to shoot.....
If you need a larger gun than that, you need a
Blackhawk, and it may not balance for you yet....

The GP-100 [GP-141 Blued finish, KGP-141 stainless steel]
is a very well balanced gun, and plenty heavy enough to
deal with the recoil.

A .357 magnum is NO WUSSIE ROUND....and must be
respected as such. As you have seen firing it.....
a pistol round, in a rifle.
You have experience with a .22lr......now you shoot
a .357......an enormous step up in all ballistic
areas, and the .357 has spoken to you !

Not to worry.....
You just need to acclimate. Get used to it.
DO NOT anticipate the kick. Train yourself to slowly
pull the trigger, and not ever know when it 'breaks' [fires]

Shoot .38special [and not +P]
Forget about great accuracy at this point....get used
to your new gun.
Try 125grain .38special and see how well it feeds in the 92.

Same philosophy for the GP-100.......
Shoot 125grain .38special until you get comfortable.

Grow with your new 'power' gradually......
The .357 is a powerhouse.
The standard .38special is almost half of the .357
Take it slowly, and have fun.....
And stay in touch with us......
As we will definitely guide you......in some direction :):):)
 

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The GP100 is about the heaviest of 'em out there, Ruger makes very beefy revolvers. For certain give it a serious consideration especially for taming recoil, it's a fine piece of machinery.

38's are a great way to work up to the .357 which is no slouch by any means, don't feel bad about getting a little bite from it. It's a powerhouse as far as pistols are concerned.

Some Hogue grips on it (or any other revolver for that matter) will help keep a handle on that sucker while shooting, very good priced and much better than the stock grips.
 

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And the GP-100 already comes with
very 'hand-friendly' Hogue monogrips........
[yep, dirty in the pics....she gets used :)]
 

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And......as I mentioned before....
On the GP-100.....
the most awesome front sight system
that allows YOU to change it to several
aftermarket sights......by simply depressing
a small pin in the front, sliding the sight out,
and replacing with your new one !!!!!
No roll pins to punch out, no drilling, no
nothing....just a spring-loaded pin.
......In-Out-On.....shoot !
Awesome....[there should be a law !]
 

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Rossi 92
Marlin 1894C
Browning 92
all .357/.38
 

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lookin' good. I've been torn what my next lever gun will be; either a .357 or .45 LC, leaning towards the .45

You're GP came with hogues? Pretty good deal.
 

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Oh, Kristie....
To soften the recoil on your 92.....
Rossi sells pretty nice recoil pads,
and not expensive.
http://www.rossiusa.com/accessories-recoil.cfm

If you call them, just tell them what rifle you have,
and refer to the recoil butt pad.....
they will surely hook you up.
Only takes a strong wrist and a screwdriver.
 

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Discussion Starter #111
Thanks, guys. You've been very reassuring and helpful and all around very cool. We'll see what I end up doing about the pistol. I'm trying to wait a little because I just bought the Rossi, I want to make the right decision, and I want to get a little more used to shooting the larger rounds, but I'm awfully anxious to make a purchase and start getting to know the gun. Next thing I'm going to have to look into is speed loaders, looks like. And I'm still trying to track down the bore guide for the muzzle of the Rossi. No one seems to have them. Might end up just having to give up and get it online. Oh, and I did order a bunch of different ammo to try from Sportsmans Guide. This new "hobby" is keeping me busy.
 

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as it should. Youre doing fantastic.. ;)
 

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Thanks, guys. You've been very reassuring and helpful and all around very cool. We'll see what I end up doing about the pistol. I'm trying to wait a little because I just bought the Rossi, I want to make the right decision, and I want to get a little more used to shooting the larger rounds, but I'm awfully anxious to make a purchase and start getting to know the gun. Next thing I'm going to have to look into is speed loaders, looks like. And I'm still trying to track down the bore guide for the muzzle of the Rossi. No one seems to have them. Might end up just having to give up and get it online. Oh, and I did order a bunch of different ammo to try from Sportsmans Guide. This new "hobby" is keeping me busy.
I think you have done quite well so far, have been given sound advice and you listened, weighed everything and made your own choice, and a good one I think,

You're headed in the right direction, and are are a crucial point in putting your disired package together, be patient until you find the revolver that fits you, as far as the recoil of the rifle, you will figure out how to shoot it so it's not uncomfortable, I admit I have not read every post in this lenghty thread, have you tried firing the rifle while standing, and leaning into it(foreward) a little? as I said I have not read the whole thread, and this may have been covered already, but looks like your doing fine, just be patient for the right pistol, you'll be glad you waited until you found THE one for you,
 

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You're doing fine.
Go shoot more often....
pretty soon, calibers, loads,
projectile weights,......
nothing will seem to be any issue. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #115
1 Eyed Jack - Yep, I fire it standing most of the time, and I do tend to lean into it. The recoil seems like it gets into my shoulder more if I fire crouched down on the ground. Haven't tried sitting because that seems like a "fake" way to learn to handle a gun. You're probably never going to be in that kind of a stance if you're using it against someone, so it seems silly to learn that way, even if accuracy would probably be better because the gun would be more steady.

Ozo, yep, need a lot more time firing it, that's for sure. The UPS man brought me five new kinds of ammo to try yesterday, so I'll have some practicing ahead of me. I did try five rounds of each yesterday. No noticeable difference in what the gun likes, but it didn't want to chamber the Fiocchis very well. They seemed tight. Maybe there was just too much powder buildup? Because those were the last ones I tried. Who knows.

Having trouble finding the right muzzle guide. This is the only one that's specifically labeled for .357 and it's got a different shape than most of them and it's only for coated rods, it seems. http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/cleaning-rods-amp-accessories/muzzle-guides/coated-rod-muzzle-guide-prod18695.aspx Maybe this one would be fine, though, because it's for .27 and up? http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/cleaning-rods-accessories/muzzle-guides/dewey-brass-muzzle-guards-prod5650.aspx Or maybe this Hoppes one? http://www.amazon.com/Hoppes-Small-Rifle-Muzzle-Guide/dp/B0000C519A/ref=pd_sim_sbs_sg_6/191-2969095-7004216 Is it actually considered a small bore rifle, though? Can't decide, and don't want to get the wrong one.
 

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I think that Dewey guide is made so that there are no sharp internal areas, that might scrape the coating. Thus it is a "coated rod guide". "Buy our special 'coated rod guide', instead of someone else's guide, and you won't damage your coated rod". I'm pretty sure it would be fine with a regular rod.

The "27 and up" would be nice if you had several different calibers of guns. You wouldn't need to buy a rod-guide for your 270 and another for your 308 and another for your 8mm, etc. But if you just have the one gun, the "made for 35 caliber" one would be fine.

When talking about rifles, "Small Bore" is 22 rimfire.
 

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I use the ones that are tapered.
That way, they will work on calibers from
.22lr to .45colt and then some.

I have never used the 'caliber specific'
guide. It may stay in place better, or it
may be in my way......don't know.

I use the ones like this
http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/cleaning-rods-accessories/muzzle-guides/dewey-brass-muzzle-guards-prod5650.aspx

The only criteria is still simple.....
there are a couple of different sizes 'inside diameter'
for your cleaning rod.
I use them in the .22 size
234-802-022WB
.22 Muzzle Guard

That way they are more universal to me
for my use.
Some cleaning rods start at .27caliber.....
so the .22caliber wouldn't fit over it.
If your cleaning rod that you now have
will go into your Henry or Single-Six...
it's a .22 rod.
 

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When you shoot standing, your whole body takes the recoil. You roll with it, pivoting on your ankles. Since your entire (in my case) 200 pounds is being moved, you feel X-amount of recoil

If you are sitting or kneeling, your body pivots at the waist, only half of your body is taking the recoil, so 100 pounds is being moved. This results in you feeling Y-amount of recoil, which is more than X.

If you are shooting prone, your body does not pivot at all, and all of the recoil of the gun is absorbed by your shoulder. This is Z-amount, which is more than Y and a lot more than X.

So there is your trade-off. Standing kicks the least, but because you are just standing there unsupported on your wavering ankles, it is the least steady and most potentially inaccurate position. Prone is the steadiest and most potentially accurate position, but has the most recoil.
 

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These are some I use.
They are for .22caliber/up cleaning rods.


This will not pertain to you Kristie...
The black rod is coated and a .17caliber rod
and the guide[.22] works on it fine.
[note: my .17caliber muzzles have been
crowned, which may allow a larger hole
for the guide to work for me]
 

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Whether standing or prone one thing that might lessen the discomfort of recoil is to make sure you are pulling the rifle firmly into your shoulder. Sometimes people just raise the piece to their shoulder with no pressure at all, so when discharged the recoil compresses tissue suddenly, causing some discomfort. Taking up the slack or pre-compressing this tissue helps to reduce the feeling that the rifle is slamming into your shoulder.
 
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