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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This rifle was handed down to me from my father but he doesn't know much about it. It originally came from either his dad or his grandfather. It appears to be a ww2 era target rifle and it has a serial number, but no manufacturer markings. I would love to figure out what kind of magazine it needs as that is currently missing. Also, the front site seems to be missing. Serial number is 18178.

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It's some type of military training rifle. It still has the original military style rear sight base. Somebody added a Lyman peep to it but that style safety eludes me. It's odd it has no markings. Take the action out of the stock, maybe there's something there that will help identify it.
 

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I believe that is it but German Style doesn't help much. German rifles have a Mauser type safety, yours does not. Maybe if you take it out of the stock and look for markings on the bottom of the action there will be something that will help.
 

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Hawg and I joke about how many different country's training rifles it "looks like", but fact is, most countries copied the German training rifles. The safety is unique, almost every "Euro" training rifle has some sort of Mauser style flag safety. The closest I could find to that receiver was on a Cowan auction for a Polish WZ-22 trainer. I've never heard of a WZ-22. Polish trainers are either a WZ-48 that looks like a Mosin, or the newer WZ-78.
"IF" it indeed was a military trainer, there will be some sort of proof mark indicating that. The problem is, the companies that produced them, also produced the near same rifles for commercial sales without those marks.
Best bet, as already suggested, pull it out of the stock, give it a good rub down with oil, and see if there is any markings under the wood. It can be something as simple as a number or letter in a circle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I'm not exactly sure how to take it apart. I'll see if I can figure that out next. As far as symbols go, do the markings on this picture mean anything? There is a star and something else below it. There is also what looks like a small circle with an "R" in it on the other side. I'll get a picture of that when it stops raining.

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Wow! This is an odd one. Obviously the front and rear sights are not originals to be certain. The original rear sight base screams "military". I've never seen a German .22 training rifle anything like this one. All of those were made to roughly resemble a Mauser. The rear of the bolt looks "Arasaka-ish" - but I'm reasonably sure it isn't Japanese.

I'm going to watch this post. I can't figure this one out.
 

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What I can't figure out is the proof mark with the R in the Circle, which I believe is French.
grcsat, it's that funky looking Russian Y in a Circle they stamp all over Mosins.
Good catch.
Slowing down in my old age Hawg, the TOZ series never entered my mind until I saw the Tula star.
 

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I would love to figure out what kind of magazine it needs as that is currently missing. Also, the front site seems to be missing.
Front sight was easy, they used a 91/30 Mosin front sight. They're out there other places like ebay, and probably cheaper than LT.

The rear sight missing ladder, looks to be the same as The Polish WZ-48 trainer.
The magazine will be the tough one, it "might be" the same as a TOZ 17.
 
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