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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Day All,

I own a Rossi snub +/- 2" VRC 357 that I greatly enjoy. I can shoot full load 357 all day long without breaking my wrists and I think it has to do with the VRC. Further, I can be fairly accurate at 8 and even 10 meters.



However on the Internet there is not a lot of info on The Rossi VRC models and I mostly found info only on the 4" or 6".

I was wondering if somebody has some more detailed info on the VRC system - we know the principle of the gas pushing the barrel down to make it more steady when you fire. Bus as I am an engineer and always dig deeper into things and have a few questions and will appreciate any technical insight.

My problem is that many bullets tumble. I mostly reload and cast 158 Gr, also use CMJ and some factory ammo - they all do the same thing even a small 95 Gr bullets in 38 special.

Even though they tumble they remain quite accurate, which is puzzling to me (see target below).

By having the VRC the barrel is effectively only 1.2" long, as it then widens into the VRC area of the barrel. Can this short barrel (effectively +/- 1.2") cause the tumble?

When the bullet is in the VRC area of the barrel the gasses can pass all around the bullet but those on top can escape though the ports on top of the barrel and a decrease in pressure. In my mind this must cause the bullet to tumble because of uneven pressure around the bullet. Any comments on this?

If the system will cause the bullet to tumble - why do the make it? Why do I not read more about it on the internet?



Then of-course, can anybody suggest a solution to the tumble? I have tried for more than 2 years to change my loads in any direction possible.

I still enjoy this little 6 shooter tremendously and it carries very well, even better than my SIG P230

Good Shooting to you all!!
 

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Your bore may be oversized and mot letting the rifling grip the bullet. Find a fired slug and see how much the rifling engraved the bullet. Slug the bore and measure it. A short barrel is not optimal for stabilizing a bullet but most will do much better then this. My guess is your barrel is oversized.
 

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Welcome to the FORUM. You said that you shoot "full load" .357s in this gun, are these hot loaded with the cast bullets mentioned in the post? If so the inaccuracy and keyholing could be because of severe leading in the barrel and forcing cone. A thorough cleaning and slugging of the barrel will give you a good idea if the issue is gun or ammunition related. As a rule cast bullets, unless cast from a hard alloy can't be driven as fast as a jacketed bullet. A plain base bullet driven at magnum velocities can sometimes melt slightly (depending on the alloy) at ignition and leave deposits of melted lead in the bore and will lead to gas cutting of the bullet shank also leaving more lead deposits in the bore. If leading is the culprit, hard alloys like linotype and Lyman #2 should cure that problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the FORUM. You said that you shoot "full load" .357s in this gun, are these hot loaded with the cast bullets mentioned in the post? If so the inaccuracy and keyholing could be because of severe leading in the barrel and forcing cone. A thorough cleaning and slugging of the barrel will give you a good idea if the issue is gun or ammunition related. As a rule cast bullets, unless cast from a hard alloy can't be driven as fast as a jacketed bullet. A plain base bullet driven at magnum velocities can sometimes melt slightly (depending on the alloy) at ignition and leave deposits of melted lead in the bore and will lead to gas cutting of the bullet shank also leaving more lead deposits in the bore. If leading is the culprit, hard alloys like linotype and Lyman #2 should cure that problem.

Thank You both for taking time to reply.

I did slug my barrel some time ago but could not get the results, just remembered I was happy. However your suggestion let me go back an do it again - I spent some time to carefully look and measure everything.

Firstly, I discovered the barrel is 51mm long and the refiling ends 19mm down from the muzzel. and you have the cone on the other side leaving a 1" (25.4mm) barrel with rifling.

The slug showed me some grooves a bit shallower than others - Then I spent a good time cleaning and cleaning. the end result is the slug measures a nice 9.02mm 0.355", the barrel ha a loose fit for a .357 bullet - no force to get it through the barrel's 6 positions.

I will try shooting it in the next week or two to check if the cleaning makes a difference.

I always check for leading and never really saw leading except when I tried some 0.356 bullets - which I expected would cause leading.

I use South African Powder Somchem MP200, We have been using this since the 1980s always with good results. The Somchem recommendation for .357 is 5.5 to 8.5 grain. I used 6 to 6.8 and 158 grain, not heavy loads, also I shoot a lot of 38 specials - 5 grain load 95 or 158 grain - same result. The 158 grain has better accuracy.

I also used jacketed bullets with same tumbling results.

I am still interested in the VRC - may it influence stability? It is hard for me to understand that it will not as there is this uneven release of gas. Few people have revolvers with VRC thus information is scarce.

Still I just love to shoot this - even more than the Ruger Speed six 4"
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just to follow up

I went shooting the weekend with supper clean barrel and found the same tumbling.

We use well attached targets, thus flapping is not a problem, although I know I know it may be.
 
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