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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's a beautiful single-shot, but is worth the 1200 MSRP?

Anybody that has one, or shot one please share your experiences.


:cool:
 

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Well, I have #3 in 22hornet. Sort of an ugly sister. It sure nuff did not cost $1200 though --not even close when new --
It was a much cheaper model when it was made --
Reliable, shoots good and is a fun machine -- not likely to bring home blue at camp perry though. :)
The #1 is chambered for some nice modern cartridges and I don't think any modern single shots are cheaper.
 

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Yes they are worth it!
I have several, not one did I purchase for the MSRP.
My best deal was a 6mm Rem with a bunch of ammo and a Kepplinger single set trigger for $475 !!!
I just purchased a 45-70 and cannot wait for it to get to my FFL
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Well, I have #3 in 22hornet.
I didn't know they had other models of single shots, has Ruger discontinued the other models?



Yes they are worth it!
I have several, not one did I purchase for the MSRP.
My best deal was a 6mm Rem with a bunch of ammo and a Kepplinger single set trigger for $475 !!!
I just purchased a 45-70 and cannot wait for it to get to my FFL
How did you manage that? :eek:
 

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Well, I'm a #1 fan...and I like the little #3 carbine too in certain calibers (45-70 NOT being one of em! OUCH! :D)

I don't own any at the moment but I am going to add one to the stable again someday. They are just a gorgeous action to look at and carry. Although I would have a hard time deciding on a #1 or an 1885 High-Wall Browning if I had to choose a single-shot.

They can have a few quirks at times as for getting accuracy out of them though. The floated barrel with the forearm mounted off of a hanger arm can give grief. but it's not really any different than tuning up the stock on the average bolt-action.
 

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I didn't know they had other models of single shots, has Ruger discontinued the other models?
Yup, Ruger discontinued the little #3 carbine in the mid-80s.
It was a cute little thing...had the same stock pattern as used on the 10/22 carbine and a simplified trigger-guard/action-lever compared to the #1.
IMO, Probably the best production lightweight "mountain rifle" ever made.
 
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I had one and it was the worst shooting guns I had ever set eyes on. It was a 22-250. No matter what bullet what powder it wouldn't shoot better than 4" groups at 100 yards. We sold it before I found the fix for it. The fix involved a washer and a few small parts.

Over all they are very well made guns and depending on the caliber are worth the price.
 

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BulletArc47:

No. 1's are notorious for not being accurate. It is the way Ruger chose to mount the front part of the stock. I have one in 270 and have never really been able to get it to shoot all that accurately. I floated the barrel, installed the tension screw in the hangar but it did not make it bolt gun accurate. I followed the mods indicated in an NRA article from the years of introduction of the No. 1.

I will say that they are beautifully made and the design is more like the European single shots than the USA single shots of the 1800's.

I also had a No. 3 in 22 Hornet with some of the same accuracy problems. I sold it off and bought a much more accurate CZ 527 bolt gun in 22 Hornet and never looked back.

The Ruger single shot No. 1 & 3 were a disappointment to me as my expectation was for a very accurate gun. The Browning 1885 Winchester clone is much more accurate and uses a much simpler mount for the front stock. My Browning 1885 in 223 in the high wall frame shoots right along with my bolt guns.

LDBennett
 

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The No. 1 is, to my mind anyway, the most beautiful modern rifle I own. I also shoots well, but it is particular about what it shoots the most accurately. Handloading is the key there, but I still haven't got under a 1 inch group at 100 yards, and I've had it since 1975! Back then it cost the huge sum of $360.00! I have a No. 3 in .375 Winchester, and it puts 5 shots in about a 2 inch group every time. Not to shabby for a brush gun! I like the Ruger single shot rifles.
 

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Its all degree (of accuracy) isn't it?

To clarify, most of my bolt guns shoot at 1 inch or better at 100 yds on rests for an average of five 5 shot groups. The Ruger No. 1 is closer to 1.5 inches. Now that is great for a hunting rifle. But the No. 1 has to be supported just so and the accuracy deteriorates if you don't support it very close to the receiver. So for me that is not a gun that is reliably accurate. But hey, it might work for you (????).

LDBennett
 

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I have one stamped on the barrel: "Made in the 200th year of American Liberty". Chambered in 7mm rem mag. Shoots 1/4" groups with the right handload. Headspaces funny, but it's a shooter. I agree that it's one of the prettiest production rifles out there.
 

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myfriendis410:

My No. 1 in 270 has that same marking and of course was made in 1976.

All belted mags have funny head space. Since the belt is the limiter for the head space most have excessive clearance between the case shoulder and the chamber. This leads to stretching of the case with a firing. Reloading them pushes the shoulder back again. It doesn't take many reloads (2 or 3) for the head to separate or at least start separating at the top of the belt. Belted mags are a pain for reloaders.

The secret is to turn the sizing die up until the sizing die does not move the shoulder back at all or no more than a thousandth or two. That way the shoulder becomes the headspace point and not the belt. You can then usually get a normal number of reloads out of the cases but the first firing does stretch the case somewhat and you may not get as many as a regular case. The drawback is your ammo will then only fit your gun and no one else's.

LDBennett
 

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I have a No 1 in .458 Win mag. I shoot my own loads, 350 gr at 2100 fps. I bought it new for around $600.00. I dont shoot paper much but right out of the box, with open sights, I put 3 rounds in the black at 100 yds. Its an extremely well made firearm.
 

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Beautiful rifles, but not worth $1200 IMO. I own four of them and consider $800 to be the top price I'd pay for a No.1 rifle. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I love mine (not the recoil), got it about 6 years ago for $888 out the door after taxes. .458 win mag

Had to special order it, only one in the whole state was even available. It's the 'tropical' No.1

So far I have not gotten good accuracy, decent but not great. I have a long way to go with my reloads before I will blame it on the gun, but will see. A very beautiful gun IMO and well balanced, mine is a bit heavy due to the caliber, about 11.5 lbs before scope.

 

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Both LD and Tango know about the accuracy problem that the #1's forearm hanger setup can cause.
BUT, I will stand by it being no worse to tune than the stock/barrel fitment on any other rifle. Unless you've got a bull-barrel version the barrel does like a bit of "tip bedding"...or upward tension of the hanger on the barrel in this case.
They can and will shoot sub-MOA...but more than likely not out of the box (which IS disappointing considering the pricetag on em nowadays).

There are two methods to follow when fitting the forearm.
Both involve insuring the forearm wood is not touching the receiver at all. That's where most out-of-the-box #1s fall on their face.

Actually, instead of typing a long lengthy post, just follow this link and they outline the job pretty well.
The method I learned is the one they list second....tapping the hanger for a setscrew to preload the hanger/barrel. Tweak the tension and try a couple different loads for grouping/stringing. I always used to use 10in/lb of torque on a 8-40 screw...not sure exactly what the preload is but it gives about a 0.035" extra clearance in the barrel/hanger gap.
BTW...if you do drill/tap the hanger make sure the setscrew is centered on the barrel and face the bottom of the screw perfectly flat. If it gets just the slightest bit off center you'll get diagonal groups. Umm...don't ask me how I know that one. :eek:

I've never tried the Hicks doo-dad since the same thing is done by simply drilling & tapping the hanger except it's a no metalwork required solution. You do need to inlet the forearm though.
 

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i have one in 375H&H mag. nice gun.. shoots great.. kicks a lil hard though..

never shot it past 100yds mind you..

I can kill paper animals at 100yds with it though.. :)
 

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myfriendis410:

My No. 1 in 270 has that same marking and of course was made in 1976.

All belted mags have funny head space. Since the belt is the limiter for the head space most have excessive clearance between the case shoulder and the chamber. This leads to stretching of the case with a firing. Reloading them pushes the shoulder back again. It doesn't take many reloads (2 or 3) for the head to separate or at least start separating at the top of the belt. Belted mags are a pain for reloaders.

The secret is to turn the sizing die up until the sizing die does not move the shoulder back at all or no more than a thousandth or two. That way the shoulder becomes the headspace point and not the belt. You can then usually get a normal number of reloads out of the cases but the first firing does stretch the case somewhat and you may not get as many as a regular case. The drawback is your ammo will then only fit your gun and no one else's.

LDBennett
Been there, done that. I have brass segregated from the rest just to use in the No. 1, and as long as I use it I get excellent case life. And great accuracy.
 
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