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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My S&W Military & Police, made in 1941 requires some outward pressure (r. to l.) to open the cylinder .. The rod is tight. If I exert a pressure on the cylinder toward the breech end then it opens easily. The cylinder when open can be moved backward and forward a small amount 1/64" - 1/32". My question is are there shims available to keep the cylinder in a "back" position so I don't have to force the cylinder to the rear to open easily.? Any help appreciated.
 

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Yes it can be shimmed but if leaves too much a gap between the cylinder and the forcing cone then your going get a lot flash and maybe damage the forcing cone. Have you checked they crane and see it might bent?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The craneseems to be OK. In holding the cylinder back to the rear it appears to still have a fairly tight gap. I havebn't checked it with a feeler gauge but it appears to be within normal tolerances. Where would I obtain shims?
 

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Brownells has a kit but it may be more than just throwing a couple of washers at it. I would send it back to S&W or to good smith, that way is the yoke need to be squared they can take care of any other problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nmckensie - I removed the thumb release lever and used some break-free and soaked it, then worked the lever back and forth and after repeating this three or four times its definitely getting better. Its not perfect but getting better. Is this as far as I can go towards cleaning this without going into total disassembly?
 

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jondar:

Sounds like you're getting close. Recommend you go to Numrich Arms site and bring up the S&W Model 10 parts schematic. You'll note the thumbpiece is attatched to the internal spring-loaded cylinder rear locking bolt, forward pressure on the rear bolt acts against the extractor rod's center pin, which in turn pushes the forward locking bolt out of engagement with the cylinder's extractor rod - in effect unlocking the cylinder's fore and aft locking points at the same time and allowing the yoke and cylinder assembly to swing free of the frame. The condition I described earlier is one in which rust or debris (or both) accumulates around the spring loaded forward locking bolt in its housing beneath the barrel, and retards forward movement enough to prevent smooth disengagement of the fore and aft locking points.

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
.22 RFM - OK I'll pull that side plate again, last time was some years ago, that time everything seemed to be spotless.

nmckensie - With the thumb lever pushed in hard the cylinder opens pretty easily, not a drop out but not difficult either. Could be the forward locking bolt, with the thumb lever pushed hard forward the pin in the forward lock extends only about 1/8" forward from the bolt. Is this about right?
 

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.22 RFM nmckensie - With the thumb lever pushed in hard the cylinder opens pretty easily, not a drop out but not difficult either. Could be the forward locking bolt, with the thumb lever pushed hard forward the pin in the forward lock extends only about 1/8" forward from the bolt. Is this about right?
Just measured the travel of the forward locking bolt on my Smith, and about 1/8" seems to be right on the money. Another consideration, and one I'd seen happen years ago with some PD S&Ws, had to do with the sideplate screws. Though nominally the same on a three screw sideplate, the forward and middle screws are generally a frog hair's different in length, one being ever-so-slightly longer than the other, with the potential for binding on the yoke's stem as it rotates in the frame. If memory serves me, one had a squared off end, the other a very slightly rounded end intended to ride in the yoke stem's retaining groove. The sideplate's rear screw has a flat rather than slightly domed head, and not easily mistaken for the forward or middle screw. Try switching screw positions, or better yet, take a close look at the end of each screw to see it one seems more suited to riding in the yoke stem's retaining groove than the other.
 

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p.s. to previous: With the cylinder open, use a hard flat object to press in on the spring loaded center pin that'll be protruding from the extractor star. With the pin depressed level with the surface of the star, take a look at the front of the cylinder's extractor rod. The center pin on the front end should be flush with the front of the extractor rod - perhaps even the thickness of a sheet of paper beyond it. If the front of the pin's sitting well below the front of the extractor rod, that could also be a cause of the glitch - in other words it might not be pushing the forward locking bolt far enough to completely clear the extractor rod. Just a thought.

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Using a flat edge (steel ruler) and pushing the center pin flush with the ejector star the pin comes exactly even with the front of the ejector rod. With a fingernail scraping along the end of the ejector rod you can't detect either overlength or underlength, it is perfectly smooth. I went one step further and used a small piece of paper folded twice as a shim in back of the front bolt lock and it made no difference in the ease of releasing the cylinder. However; it is now a lot easier to release it and simply requires a push of the finger instead of a thump with the palm of the hand. I don't have a proper screwdriver at this time to fit the sideplate screws so may wait to try that.

Thanks very much to both of you for your good suggestions.
 
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