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I have a .223 I shoot at the range. We shoot 100 and 200 yds. The scope I have the cross hair covers the bills eye at those ranges. Does any one have any suggestions as to what scope I should look at that will help me . I have a TC Venture, it is a bolt gun. I, am not looking to spend a whole lot of money. Thanks for your help.
 

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When you say the crosshair covers the bullseye, do you mean it is too thick? I once bought a Nikon P223 scope, I found that the crosshairs were so thin that I could barely see them, maybe something like that will work for you.
 

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GUNZILLA
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I have a Sightron scope that has a dot reticle for target shooting very very small dot and cross hairs that works great at the distance you gave.
 

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Weaver T-24, or T-36. Both have a fine cross hair reticule or a fine cross hair with a 1/8 MOA center dot.
The Weaver’s are popular in IBS & USBA competition for those shooters who do not want to spend a $1000 + for a Leupold. Many of competitor have won matches with the Weaver brand.
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Could not find an image of the reticule with the center dot.
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I am only using Amazon for picture examples, but I recommend buying it from someone other then Amazon.
 

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Find a reticle that works for you and then find a scope that has it.
 

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Thanks, but not sure what you mean. I, would like to try that.
Instead of crosshairs on center dot of target, adjust the scopt so it can use the outter ring of the target to box it on two sides. Imagine a ball where the circumference of the ball touches to points of a right angle. For instance, if we have a 4 inch circle, we can arbitrarily pick the center of the crosshairs to be at the lower right of the target by turning the top elevation turret dial so it moves the horizontal part of crosshair down to the bottom of the circle. Then move the right side windage turret over to the right side of the circle. Lets say your scope has 1/4 moa knobs. You have 4 little tick marks between the big numbers. That means you'd move each of the knobs 4 whole numbers. As you have your rifle set so it can't move. You could just look thru the scope and tweek the knobs to the horizontal and verticle positions. NOTE: after you fire a shot. Your bullet will hit a spot. Keep your crosshairs on the original spot where you touched the outter circle. Then, without moving the rifle, move the two crosshairs to cause the next shot to hit the center of the target while your crosshairs are on the outter ring of the target. You can see how you can pick dufferent parts of the target to align the reticles. Sometimes a take a small bubble level with me an level the paper and staple it level. Then I can use top horizontal crosshair to sit perfectly aligned to the paper by laying it on the top of the paper then adjust accordingly to hit where I want on the target. I have trouble seeing little holes in the black so I shoot on white areas.
 

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Older scopes generally had finer cross wire's in them. Newer scope's with heavier cross wires are no problem at all. Simply make the aiming point bigger. I like using diamond's for an aiming point. Four point's around the diamond, one for each cross wire! Some I simply use a larger circle. Instead of 1", I'll make it 1 1/2" or even 2". It's simply an aiming point, nothing more
 
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