Seasick Sailor

Discussion in 'Vietnam Memories Forum' started by Guest, Mar 6, 2003.

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    Misterstan
    Moderator
    Posts: 165
    (5/24/01 8:58:03 am)
    | Del All Seasick Sailor
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    I remember one of my first days on board our ship in early November 1970. While the crew was unloading ammunition and supplies onto the dock at Nha Be (pronounced “Naw Bay”), some of the guys were singing a song by Otis Redding. They changed the words to “Sitting on the dock at Nha Be”.

    Once the pallets were unloaded, we were again underway to our next destination. I had already been in the Navy for about 2 ½ years but this was the first and only time I ever served on a ship.

    While standing with a group of my new shipmates, I began to feel nauseated from the movement of the ship. I noticed that I was the only one who was having trouble and tried not to show it hoping the weird feeling would just go away.

    Instead, it kept getting worse until one of the other sailors could see I was getting seasick. He suggested that I eat some crackers and stay in my bunk for a while. I did and it worked.

    I have earned the distinction of being one of probably a very small number of sailors who actually got seasick while underway on a river!

    After our tour of duty in Vietnam was over and our ship was heading to Japan, I found myself standing on the fantail (back of the ship) holding on to the side rail as the ship was experiencing 35-foot plus waves in the Sea of Japan. Our ship was only about 180 feet long and every once in a while the entire back of the ship was lifted completely out of the water.

    Not the least bit afraid and feeling very comfortable, I was having yet another experience of a lifetime.

    Stan Lambert
    St. Clair Shores, Michigan


    Remf
    Moderator
    Posts: 182
    (5/24/01 11:25:54 am)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    I was Army but I've felt thta way a few times too, & the cracker trick worked for me too. I spent time on the fron (bow?) as the waves would be breaking over the deck.

    LarryJK
    Senior Chief Moderator III
    Posts: 9
    (5/24/01 1:13:49 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    I had heard before that if you ate something greasy you would be ok.
    Stan...when y'all left US port...didn't the clock start running towards your time in VN?

    Misterstan
    Moderator
    Posts: 168
    (5/24/01 2:07:41 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    Larry,

    I met my ship in Vietnam. I flew over on Continental Airlines.

    I spent some time in Saigon at first, then I went to Cat Lo, which was my ship's home port. Since my ship was still out on a supply run, I worked for a few days with the Shore Patrol. I drove a jeep and carried a 45 and a big stick.

    I arrived in Vietnam in October 1970 and didn't meet my ship until the first week of November. When I first saw it, I was surprised they called it a "ship" because it was only about 180 feet long.

    Stan Lambert
    St. Clair Shores, Michigan

    106RR196LIB
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 108
    (5/24/01 2:35:53 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    My only Naval experience was on a Swift Boat out of Danang to Chu Lai. It was during Tet and it was an emergency run for me, a routine patrol for them. I was required to present myself to the Skipper and request permission to come aboard. Naval courtesy I guess, but he gladly offered to take me to Chu Lai. He failed to mention that there would be a transfer at sea to another Swift Boat.
    After we were out of range from shore based fire I was a lot more relaxed. Then the waves got a LOT bigger. One of the sailors told me that the waves were 12 to 16 feet and the boat was only designed to take 8 feet. I said " Oh then we have to turn back right?" He laughed and said Hell No!
    I didn't feel sick until he told me how big the waves were.
    I went out to the stern and launched a minimal amount (I had been on short rations for days) of food into the South China Sea.
    We met another Swift at sea and they swapped steak,ham and mail. I had no idea the Navy ate so well. I thought he was kidding when the skipper told me to jump across to the other boat. Are you crazy - I'll fall in between the boats or just drown. The Ems told me it was SOP and they did it all the time. So I jumped and made it OK. Since the Swift Boats were small (by Navy standards) they do not use a rope to transfer at sea. You just jump from one boat to the other.
    I did find the Navy to be very courteous even in desperate times. They even fed me. During Tet in Danang, the Marines refused mess hall service to GIs because the City was running out of food. The spectre of going hungry changes a lot of attitudes. Thank You US Navy! Mike H

    Edited by: 106RR196LIB at: 5/24/01 4:32:28 pm

    Genog
    Moderator
    Posts: 93
    (5/24/01 2:39:26 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    Larry,
    I can't answer that one as I also flew over to Shit city in the Philipines.
    Eating something greasy only made it come up easier. Did not prevent it. Most seasickness was caused by people talking theirselves into it. I was sick once and that was because of a hangover. I felt so bad that I convinced myself that I needed to hit the fantail, and I did. Of course being on the outskirts of a typhoon didn't help the situation any. That old flat bottom ship was banging around.

    Geno G

    LarryJK
    Senior Chief Moderator III
    Posts: 11
    (5/24/01 4:48:11 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    Stan...you sure did something that I'm glad I didn't have to do and that is be on a ship...no matter how long it was. I can imagine that it would have been a major up-chuck for me!

    homer4
    Moderator
    Posts: 632
    (5/24/01 7:47:45 pm)
    | Del Re: Seasick Sailor
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    While not Nam related...I along with two of my brother-in-laws and my wifes cousin went down to Ocean City MD for some charter boat fishing some 5 miles out or so.

    I went down into the cabin to fetch some more beer and grab some sandwiches for us. Well there they were guys...Green is a close color...several of them were sittin over buckets and I'm telling you the truth...if I had pulled out a gun and shot em...they'd apreciateded it.

    They were some of the saddest and most wretched looking people I ever seen.They had to ride it out for the rest of the day,cause they weren't about to go back with other paying customers out for the day also.

    Remember someone saying that the most center and lowest point aboard is the place to be when seasick.Man,I hope I never ever get seasick.
    ...and two hard boiled eggs.

    Edited by: homer4 at: 5/24/01 8:50:11 pm