shooting .22 rimfire in a C&B replica

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by tom coffey, Jul 23, 2020.

  1. tom coffey

    tom coffey Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2020
    Messages:
    16
    Not sure which forum to put this in... But anybody shoot .22 rimfire in a cab-n-ball replica gun? I know it is done, but know nothing about the conversions. I have an Italian made 1860, brass framed Colt .44 cal army that I would like to shoot rimfires in, if the conversion can be reversed and the pistol easily converted back to the original form. Somebody school me, please. Thanks.
     
    BlackEagle and Kweeksdraw like this.
  2. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    8,558
    Location:
    Oregon.
    I haven't ever done it but toyed with the idea.
    My boss has some .22 caliber barrel liners that have a .375 od. You would have to line the barrel of a .36 caliber after reaming the bore to .375. The liner would need to be soldered in to the barrel. You would also have to line the cylinder after boring it through, (and soldering in the liners, modify the hammer to strike the rim after the modified cylinder is chambered for .22 rimfire and most likely need to build up the open rear of the frame with weld where the original hammer struck the percussion cap, leaving a small hole for the new firing pin type hammer you'd need to make or modify. So, no, once you convert it, it's permanent.
     
    jim brady and Kweeksdraw like this.

  3. Kweeksdraw

    Kweeksdraw Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    Texas
    jim brady likes this.
  4. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    37,432
    Location:
    Athens, Georgia
    He was banned for the use of profanity.
     
  5. Kweeksdraw

    Kweeksdraw Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    Texas
    Thanks for the reply. I like it a lot better than some of the reasons I was contemplating for his absence. Now, if only I hadn't missed the fireworks :lurk:
     
    sharps4590 likes this.
  6. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    10,166
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    From Griz's description it doesn't sound easy, economical or reversible. I certainly wouldn't bother with a brass framed revolver if I were doing it.
     
    Kweeksdraw, BlackEagle and jim brady like this.
  7. sourdoughjim

    sourdoughjim Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2020
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    SW WA State
    https://kirstkonverter.com/22-colt-conversion-kit.html

    I have one for a Pietta 1851 Navy .36. It works well for me. I use standard velocity ammo only. No modification to the revolver required. I don't see why a brass framed revolver would not work unless it has been subjected to heavy .44 BP loads which causes the cylinder ratchet teeth to be imprinted into the brass recoil shield ring around the arbor.

    Well made but not inexpensive.

    Jim
     
    sharps4590 likes this.
  8. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    8,558
    Location:
    Oregon.
    On a Colt it could be reversible if you had two barrels, ,two cylinders, two hammers and a lot of skill and knowledge on using things like lathes, mills, tig welders and hand files. On a brass framed Colt, I wouldn't bother with it. On a steel framed Remington Navy repo with a rusted bore, I'd have been tempted to try for a permanent conversion, alas, we never had a rusted up Remington Navy repo come into the shop on a trade for me to give it a shot.
     
    Kweeksdraw, BlackEagle and sharps4590 like this.
  9. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    10,166
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    That's pretty clever sourdough. For almost $400 it should be. That isn't being critical, merely an observation given what percussion revolvers can be bought for new. There's no doubt I've spent more for less....and recently!!!

    Question; Given most percussion revolvers I've had shoot pretty high, how well does that set up shoot to the sights? Also, are those short little stubs the barrel for the 22? From what I see in the ad, they must be. I'm not knocking that either. I have a 22 LR, Sempert-Krieghoff einstecklauf for one of my drillings and it only has a 10 inch barrel. It shoots minute of squirrel head out to 35 yards.
     
    Kweeksdraw and sourdoughjim like this.
  10. sourdoughjim

    sourdoughjim Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2020
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    SW WA State
    Don't feel like the Lone Ranger: I have done the same a time or two! Yeah, it's a spendy unit but the best part is that no modification is needed to the revolver. That's what sold me on it. I bought mine about 3 years ago on sale.

    Yes, it still shoots high. Those "stubs" are the barrels. It will shoot minute-of-soda-can at 50' or so. Just a plinker, but easier to clean than BP. The only minor drawback (for me) is that I had to fashion a tool from a piece of 1/8" brass brazing rod to push the fired cases out of the chambers. I keep it in my shirt pocket when shooting the revolver.

    If one is looking for a conversion unit with a longer barrel insert/liner, Howell makes one; IMHO, it is a bit ungainly and one has to remove the cylinder to reload it. On a Colt, that means pulling the wedge and the barrel every six shots. It costs less than the Kirst but I passed on it.

    https://www.howellarms.com/1851-navy/185161-navy-pietta-36-conversion-kit-to-22lr

    Regards,

    Jim
     
    Kweeksdraw and sharps4590 like this.
  11. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    10,166
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    Hmmm...interesting. It appears there is advantages and disadvantages to both systems. Neither is something I'm likely to indulge in but.....as I said, I've spent more for less and I've learned when it comes to firearms and me I should "never say never".
     
    Kweeksdraw and sourdoughjim like this.
  12. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Messages:
    7,079
    Location:
    Simla, Colorado
    As far as ejecting spent cases from the cylinder, didn't the early conversions use a piece welded to the ball loading ram to push out the spent cases? I don't see why someone couldn't do the same for a .22 conversion. It would be handier than carrying a separate tool to do the job...

    To me, the hard part would be a loading gate - so you could load cartridges without disassembling the cylinder. As far as safety with modern .22 LR cartridges - those should be less pressure than a .36 or .44 round ball with BP.

    Dixie Gun Works (I don't know if they are even still around) used to sell barrel liners in .22 caliber. They also used to sell liners that could be cut and reamed to chamber .22 cartridges. If you had the skill as a machinist, a conversion could be made to make a barrel that would be inserted from the front of the existing barrel and held in place with a thin locking nut from the breech-end. With a tight fit in the existing barrel's rifling (and a flange machined into the conversion barrel at the muzzle end) a permanent alteration to the existing revolver would not be necessary.

    For the cylinder, a separate cylinder could be used. The front end would have to be milled slightly to give clearance for the conversion barrel lock nut, while the rear of the cylinder would have to be milled slightly to allow contact for the hammer face and the .22 rimfire cartridge head. The .22 LR chamber liners could be permanently soldered in place.

    I don't have the skills - just the ideas...
     
    Kweeksdraw likes this.